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Using SQL Server 2008+.

I have a rowversion column (aka timestamp) which I retrieve from the database and convert into into a numeric(20,0) using the following code:

CONVERT(NUMERIC(20,0), RowVersionColumn + 0) AS [RowVersion]    

Later on, I need to take that numeric value (which is stored in a ADO.NET DataSet as a ulong/UInt64), and convert it back into a rowversion data type.

This creates problems, though. It seems as though while you can convert out to numeric(20,0), the reverse operation fails to yield the correct value. For instance:

DECLARE @MyNumericValue NUMERIC(20,0)
DECLARE @MyRowVersionValue ROWVERSION

SET @MyNumericValue = 12345
SET @MyRowVersionValue = CONVERT(rowversion, @MyNumericValue)

PRINT CONVERT(NUMERIC(20,0), @MyRowVersionValue + 0)

Running this code prints out a value of 959447040, not 12345. Removing the "+ 0" from the CONVERT statement yeilds the correct result, but I'm still unable to reliably take a numeric value that used to be a rowversion and turn it back into a rowversion whose value is what it should be.

Below is an even better demonstration of this issue:

DECLARE @MyNumericValue NUMERIC(20,0)
DECLARE @MyRowVersionValue ROWVERSION
DECLARE @MyRowVersionValue2 ROWVERSION

SET @MyRowVersionValue = @@DBTS
SET @MyNumericValue = CONVERT(NUMERIC(20,0), @MyRowVersionValue + 0)
SET @MyRowVersionValue2 = CONVERT(rowversion, @MyNumericValue)

SELECT @MyRowVersionValue 
SELECT @MyNumericValue
SELECT @MyRowVersionValue2

Your results will vary depending on your inputs, but as an example my output was:

0x0000000003ADBB2F
61717295
0x140000012FBBAD03

The first and last values should match, but they don't. I'm guessing this has something to do with the fact that binary data conversions often result in padding, and this padding changes the value. See:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa223991(v=SQL.80).aspx

Thoughts?

EDIT: To clarify, the fact I'm dealing with rowversion/timestamp is incidental. This same issue happens with BINARY(8) instead of ROWVERSION, as they're equivalent data types.

share|improve this question
    
Not sure who to give credit to. Nobody really provided a solution (nor could they, apparently) as this is a SQL Server bug. See: support.microsoft.com/kb/141664 In the end, I just take the binary value and use the following C# code to convert it to a ulong: BitConverter.ToUInt64(rowVersionByteArray.Reverse().ToArray(), 0);. –  RMD Jun 30 '11 at 20:22
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

While I don't understand why you would be converting a meaningless ROWVERSION value to a number and then back again, did you try with BIGINT - which matches the 8 bytes required by UInt64 and not the variable number of bytes (depending on the actual value) that forcing NUMERIC(20,0) would change it to?

CREATE TABLE dbo.rv(a INT, rv ROWVERSION);

INSERT dbo.rv(a) SELECT 1 UNION SELECT 2;

WITH x AS
(
    SELECT 
        rv, 
        rv_as_bigint = CONVERT(BIGINT, rv) 
    FROM dbo.rv
)
SELECT 
    rv, 
    rv_as_bigint, 
    rv_back_to_rv = CONVERT(ROWVERSION, rv_as_bigint) 
FROM x;

DROP TABLE dbo.rv;

Or taking your original sample and just swapping BIGINT in for NUMERIC(20,0):

DECLARE @MyNumericValue BIGINT
DECLARE @MyRowVersionValue ROWVERSION
DECLARE @MyRowVersionValue2 ROWVERSION

SET @MyRowVersionValue = @@DBTS
SET @MyNumericValue = CONVERT(BIGINT, @MyRowVersionValue) -- removed the +0 hack
SET @MyRowVersionValue2 = CONVERT(rowversion, @MyNumericValue)

SELECT @MyRowVersionValue 
SELECT @MyNumericValue
SELECT @MyRowVersionValue2
share|improve this answer
    
BIGINT won't work. BIGINT is a signed value, where as my NUMERIC(20,0) can contain all the possible values of a ROWVERSION column as unsigned data. Using big int would result in negative values after the conversion for large rowversion values. –  RMD Jun 29 '11 at 23:50
    
Also, to answer your question, I do some sorting operations on the values in a C# program. The ROWVERSION column isn't meaningless - it's a forever incrementing value. That's important for my application log, which is why I'm using it. You could replace all ROWVERSION references in my examples with BINARY(8), and you would have the same issue. –  RMD Jun 29 '11 at 23:52
    
I tried with values at -9000000000000000000 and 9000000000000000000 and it still worked fine. Can you tell me that you are going to generate ROWVERSION values that will exceed this? Can you provide a repro? –  Aaron Bertrand Jun 29 '11 at 23:59
    
Also, I find it hard to believe that your C# program would not be able to sort the binary values without converting them to a numeric value first. C# can no longer deal with a byte array? And then why do you need to convert them back again? Can't you convert to numeric and leave the original value intact? Why do you need two-way conversion? –  Aaron Bertrand Jun 30 '11 at 0:09
    
While unlikely, I'm trying to make sure the data types I use will fit all possible values in the database. As far as sorting the byte array, I hadn't actually tried that. I had kind of assumed that, for instance, doing a LINQ statement which does an OrderBy on a byte[] field wouldn't work. Perhaps I'm wrong. I'll give it a shot. –  RMD Jun 30 '11 at 0:13
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When you convert data to binary (rowversion is essentially binary(8)), you get its internal representation rather than the logical value. You can verify the behavior with the following snippet:

DECLARE @MyNumericValue NUMERIC(20,0) = 0
SELECT @MyNumericValue, CONVERT(binary(8), @MyNumericValue)

Or you can try

DECLARE @MyBinary binary(8) = 0x00
SELECT @MyBinary, CONVERT(numeric(20,0), @MyBinary)

It won't convert at all. So, what is really going on with your script is:

SET @MyNumericValue = 12345
-- @MyRowVersionValue gets the internal representation of the numeric value 12345
SET @MyRowVersionValue = CONVERT(rowversion, @MyNumericValue)
-- +0 converts the binary value to int, then performs int-to-numeric conversion 
PRINT CONVERT(NUMERIC(20,0), @MyRowVersionValue + 0)
-- Real binary-to-numeric conversion.
PRINT CONVERT(NUMERIC(20,0), @MyRowVersionValue)

The real binary-to-numeric conversion is safe, but in your case, you may want to convert the rowversion to a bigint (or forget about the numeric value and just store it as a binary string) rather than numeric, since CONVERT(NUMERIC(20,0), @MyRowVersionValue) doesn't really get you the numeric value.

share|improve this answer
    
I suspected that the +0 was causing an INT conversion. The problem is, the CONVERT statement without it fails. It seems to be a bug in SQL Server. –  RMD Jun 29 '11 at 23:54
    
@RMD - it's not a bug, it's because some binary values are not valid internal representations of numeric values. For example, no numeric value is represented as 0x0000000000000000. Yes you can convert binary->int->numeric, but when you need to reverse it you need numeric->int->binary too. –  Yuxiu Li Jun 30 '11 at 0:00
    
@forcey - I'm not sure that makes sense to me. A 0x0000000000000000 byte array value = a numeric value of 0. If the issue were that certain byte array values don't make sense when converted to a numeric, wouldn't they also not make sense when convert to an INT? –  RMD Jun 30 '11 at 0:27
    
@RMD - The SQL numeric type does not represent numbers that way, because it needs to handle decimal numbers. And the representation may be different in different versions. Float is another example - the float value of 1.0 is not necessarily represented as 0x0000000000000001. However, integer types always represent numbers 'as is'. –  Yuxiu Li Jun 30 '11 at 0:34
    
@forcey - Ah, that makes sense. Still, SQL Server BOL clear states that a conversion between binary and numeric is possible, but it throws an error when I try to run the convert statement - and that's what forced the int/bigint hack to begin with. It seems like this is def a bug. –  RMD Jun 30 '11 at 1:01
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