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Here is the PHP im working with:

Below values from a database:

$quote = 49;
$add_amp = 0;
$con_array = "3,2,1";


function calcAddAmp($mul)
{
    $add_amp = $add_amp + $mul*($quote);

}


$con_array = explode(",", $con);

for($i = 0; $i < count($con_array); $i++) { 
    switch ($fun) {
        case 1:
            calcAddAmp(.01);
            break;
        case 2:
            calcAddAmp(.05);
            break;
        case 3:
            calcAddAmp(.02);
            break;
        case 4:
            calcAddAmp(.09);
            break;
    }
}



$quote = $quote + $add_amp;

The issue is seen here:

echo $add_amp;

$add_amp returns 0, which makes $quote the same value as before, 49.

echo $quote;

I'm sure I am just writing this function incorrectly, but I can't find where I went wrong.

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4  
$add_amp does not "return" anything. It is not a function. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 29 '11 at 22:31
    
@Tomalak Geret'kal: Every function in PHP returns something, if only it’s an implicit null value. –  Gumbo Jun 29 '11 at 22:34
1  
@Gumbo: $add_amp is a variable, not a function. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 29 '11 at 22:37
    
Even if the variable $add_amp inside the function would not be bound to the function scope, you’re not reassigning $quote anywhere. –  Gumbo Jun 29 '11 at 22:41
    
@Gumbo: I don't understand what you're trying to say, sorry. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 29 '11 at 22:45

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Variables have function scope. Setting $add_amp inside a function does not automatically modify the variable by the same name outside the function. If you don't return the value from the function it's pointless. I'd simplify this whole unnecessary switch/function to this though:

$multipliers = array(1 => .01, 2 => .05, 3 => .02, 4 => .09);

foreach ($con_array as $con) {
    $add_amp += $multipliers[$con] * $quote;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing out that the switch function is not necessary. This is very useful –  TaylorMac Jun 29 '11 at 22:48
    
Most of the other answers were sufficient, thanks everyone! –  TaylorMac Jun 29 '11 at 22:48

$add_amp is declared outside of your function.

If you want to modify the global one, you need to change your function like this:

function calcAddAmp($mul)
{     
    global $quote;
    global $add_amp;
    $add_amp = $add_amp + $mul * $quote;
}

It would be even better to just return the value from your function:

function calcAddAmp($mul,$a,$q)
{
    return $a + $mul * $q;
}

$add_amp = calcAddAmp(0.5,$add_amp,$quote);
share|improve this answer
    
@joakim: Why's that? The entire point of the second example is that it does not use globals. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 29 '11 at 22:39
    
@joakimdahlstrom: No, the second method avoids using global variables, which makes it a better way to do this. Instead the required variables are passed as an argument. Makes it a lot easier to maintain the code, because it has no side effects. –  Wouter van Nifterick Jun 29 '11 at 22:40
    
@Tomalak Geret'kal Oh haha, he just changed the function, it was incomplete before. –  joakimdahlstrom Jun 29 '11 at 22:41
    
Yeah, it's different now from when I commented on it. –  joakimdahlstrom Jun 29 '11 at 22:42

Use the global keyword in the function. And your switch is wrong $fun is not defined.

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The $add_amp is a local variable in the function. It will be reassigned every time you call the function, and the $add_amp variable that you created at the top will always be 0.

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Here is another approach, by using reference:

function calcAddAmp(&$add_amp, $mul)
{
    global $quote;

    $add_amp += $mul*($quote);
}

example of usage:

calcAddAmp($add_amp, 0.5);
share|improve this answer

Quote and add_amp need to be global.

global $quote;
global $add_amp;

$quote = 49;
$add_amp = 0;
$con_array = "3,2,1";


function calcAddAmp($mul)
{
    global $quote;
    global $add_amp;

    $add_amp = $add_amp + $mul*($quote);

}
share|improve this answer
for($i = 0; $i < count($con_array); $i++) { 
    switch ($fun) {

I think you meant:

for($i = 0; $i < count($con_array); $i++) { 
    switch ($con_array[$i]) {

Otherwise your cases never match (as $fun doesn't exist), calcAddAmp is never called and $add_amp's value never changes.


You will also need to be sure to use the global $add_amp and $quote in calcAddAmp, as at the moment you're operating on some new local ones with the same name:

function calcAddAmp($mul) {
   global $add_amp, $quote;
   $add_amp += $mul * $quote;
}

or

function calcAddAmp($mul) {
   $GLOBALS['add_amp'] += $mul * $GLOBALS['quote'];
}

It would be better to avoid globals entirely, and pass these variables where they are required as function parameters.

share|improve this answer
    
$quote also needs to be global, in this case. –  lonesomeday Jun 29 '11 at 22:37
    
@lonesomeday: Good spot! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 29 '11 at 22:37

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