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public class MyPix ()
 {
     pixColor = Color.BLUE;
 }

public void draw(Graphics g)
    {
        g.setColor(pixColor);
        g.fillOval(5,5,10,10);
    }

Given I have above simplified class. How would I make my shape cycle in color without interaction. I did not get the thread/sleep thing to work yet.

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that's about javax.swing.Timer stackoverflow.com/questions/6171414/… –  mKorbel Jun 30 '11 at 7:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Without interaction your going to need to user something like SwingWorker, which is easier to work with in Swing than Thread/Sleep system. See the tutorial on SwingWorker for more information

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2  
Probably, more precisely, a javax.swing.Timer. –  Lawrence Dol Jun 29 '11 at 23:13
1  
@Software Monkey Put that in an answer, I forgot about it. Its much better for this problem –  TheLQ Jun 29 '11 at 23:18
2  
@Stephan Because it doesn't execute in the AWT thread. –  TheLQ Jun 29 '11 at 23:23
1  
@Stephan No, you have to implement it. To do it quick just pass an anonymous ActionListener as the second parameter in the Swing Timer constructor. –  TheLQ Jun 30 '11 at 0:56
1  
@Stephan Its not really any kind of pattern, its just passing an instance. And I guess technically an anonymous inner class is a singleton, but only in an extremely general way. –  TheLQ Jun 30 '11 at 5:23

Do you want discrete or continuous color changes? If the latter --

static Color getBGColor1() {
    float h = System.currentTimeMillis()*1e-3f,
          s = .1f, b = .9f;
    return Color.getHSBColor(h, s, b);
}

Edit: perhaps you want something like this?

static Random rnd = new Random();
static Color getBGColor2() {
    rnd.setSeed(System.nanoTime()/1000000000*1337);
    float h = rnd.nextFloat(), s = .1f, b = .9f;
    return Color.getHSBColor(h, s, b);
}
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That looks elegant, but I don't understand it fully. Why chose 5f and 9f and 1e3f ? –  Sir Ben Benji Jun 29 '11 at 23:36
1  
I basically made them up. Dividing a time in milliseconds by 1e3 (1000) should convert it to seconds, so System.currentTimeMillis()/1e3f is just the current time in seconds. getHSBColor normally takes a hue between 0 and 1, but we can also give it a float above 1 and it will use the fractional part. So this code cycles through hues with a period of one second. If that seems too fast or too slow, you can add any multiplier you like. I picked s and b (saturation and brightness) arbitrarily; feel free to change those too; –  Daniel Jun 30 '11 at 0:55
    
It cycles with this: h = (float) Math.random(), s=3, b=2; but is ugly as heck. –  Sir Ben Benji Jun 30 '11 at 1:26
1  
I added some different code, is that closer to what you're after? (The 1000000000 causes it to switch to a random color once per second, but you can use a larger int for slower changes or a small int for more rapid changes.) –  Daniel Jun 30 '11 at 2:44
    
Thank you Daniel, I especially like the way you integrated 1337 ;D –  Sir Ben Benji Jun 30 '11 at 7:47

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