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I am attempting to draw radials from the center of an ellipse in quartz.

CGContextSetRGBStrokeColor(ctx, 0.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0); //cyan stroke
CGContextSetLineWidth(ctx, 2.0);
CGContextFillEllipseInRect(ctx, oRect);

CGContextSaveGState(ctx);        

CGPoint center = CGPointMake(CGRectGetMidX(oRect), CGRectGetMidY(oRect));
CGFloat maxX = CGRectGetMaxX(oRect);

for(int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
    CGContextBeginPath(ctx);        
    CGContextMoveToPoint(ctx, maxX, center.y);
    CGContextAddLineToPoint(ctx, center.x, center.y);
    CGContextClosePath(ctx);
    CGContextStrokePath(ctx);
    CGContextRotateCTM(ctx, degreesToRadians(5.0));
}


CGContextRestoreGState(ctx);

Result: quartz result

Instead of the line drawing emanating from the center of the ellipse, it shifts with each transformation of the matrix. Why is the center reset instead of rotated?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Quite simply, it's because the CGContextRotateCTM(ctx, degreesToRadians(5.0)); call applies a rotation matrix around the origin of the coordinate system. In this case, it appears that the origin is at the top-left of your view. The whole thing is swiveling around that top-left corner, rather than around the mid-point of your view.

If you'd like to rotate around the center of your view, you'll need to first shift the coordinate system. The simplest way to do this is probably just to apply a translation to move it to the center, apply the rotation, and then apply another translation to move it back to the corner. It will end up looking like this:

///...
CGPoint center = CGPointMake(CGRectGetMidX(oRect), CGRectGetMidY(oRect));
CGFloat maxX = CGRectGetMaxX(oRect);

for(int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
    CGContextBeginPath(ctx);        
    CGContextMoveToPoint(ctx, maxX, center.y);
    CGContextAddLineToPoint(ctx, center.x, center.y);
    CGContextClosePath(ctx);
    CGContextStrokePath(ctx);
    CGContextTranslateCTM(ctx, center.x, center.y); // Note
    CGContextRotateCTM(ctx, degreesToRadians(5.0));
    CGContextTranslateCTM(ctx, -center.x, -center.y); // Note
}

You could, of course, lump that whole translate-rotate-translate operation into a single CGAffineTransform, like so:

// Outside the loop
CGAffineTransform transform = CGAffineTransformMakeTranslation(center.x, center.y);
transform = CGAffineTransformRotate(transform, degreesToRadians(5.0));
transform = CGAffineTransformTranslate(transform, -center.x, -center.y);

for(int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
    // ...
    CGContextConcatCTM(ctx, transform);
}

This would save you the performance hit of doing three separate matrix operations each pass through the loop. But choose whichever one is clearer to you; unless you see a measurable impact on your performance, always prefer maintainability.

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Good point. I realize the rotation was happening around the top-left origin. However, your first sample didn't work until I reversed the translation calls. The first one could be to a positive center.x & center.y instead of the negative. It worked fine once I reversed the negative / positive operands. –  samfu_1 Jul 1 '11 at 1:11
    
Ah, good to know. I couldn't remember if it was translating the origin or the drawing calls, though I guess it's ultimately the same thing. Anyway, I'll fix it. –  BJ Homer Jul 1 '11 at 4:17

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