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I've been programming PHP for a long time, but not so much PHP 5... I've known about exception handling in PHP 5 for some time, but never really looked into it. After a quick Google it seems fairly pointless to use exception handling - I can't see the advantages of using it over just using some if() {} statements, and perhaps my own error handling class or whatever.

There's got to be a bunch of good reasons for using it (I guess?!) otherwise it wouldn't have been put into the language (probably). Can anyone tell me of some good benefits it has over just using a bunch of if statements or a switch statement or something?

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by exception handling do you mean try catch? –  Ibu Jun 30 '11 at 5:16
    
yes he do. I'm sure he do –  genesis Jun 30 '11 at 5:20
2  

8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Exceptions allow you to distinguish between different types of errors, and is also great for routing. For example...

class Application
{
    public function run()
    {
        try {
            // Start her up!!
        } catch (Exception $e) {
            // If Ajax request, send back status and message
            if ($this->getRequest()->isAjax()) {
                return Application_Json::encode(array(
                    'status' => 'error',
                    'msg'    => $e->getMessage());
            }

            // ...otherwise, just throw error
            throw $e;
        }
    }
}

The thrown exception can then be handled by a custom error handler.

Since PHP is a loosely typed language, you might need to ensure that only strings are passed as arguments to a class method. For example...

class StringsOnly
{
    public function onlyPassStringToThisMethod($string)
    {
        if (!is_string($string)) {
            throw new InvalidArgumentException('$string is definitely not a string');
        }

        // Cool string manipulation...

        return $this;
    }
}

...or if you need to handle different types of exceptions in different ways.

class DifferentExceptionsForDifferentFolks
{
    public function catchMeIfYouCan()
    {
        try {
            $this->flyForFree();
        } catch (CantFlyForFreeException $e) {
            $this->alertAuthorities();
            return 'Sorry, you can\'t fly for free dude. It just don\'t work that way!';
        } catch (DbException $e) {
            // Get DB debug info
            $this->logDbDebugInfo();
            return 'Could not access database. What did you mess up this time?';
        } catch (Exception $e) {
            $this->logMiscException($e);
            return 'I catch all exceptions for which you did not account!';
        }
    }
}

If using transactions in something like Zend Framework:

class CreditCardController extends Zend_Controller_Action
{
    public function buyforgirlfriendAction()
    {
        try {
            $this->getDb()->beginTransaction();

            $this->insertGift($giftName, $giftPrice, $giftWowFactor);

            $this->getDb()->commit();
        } catch (Exception $e) {
            // Error encountered, rollback changes
            $this->getDb()->rollBack();

            // Re-throw exception, allow ErrorController forward
            throw $e;
        }
    }
}
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If you are following the object-oriented methodology then exceptions comes handy for the error handling. It is convenient to communicate the errors through exception across the objects. Exceptions are really helpful if you go with layered design approach.

If you are not coding in object-oriented way, then exceptions are not required.

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In general there are two good reasons to use exception handling:

  1. You might now always know where an exception will occur - something unexpected could arise. If you use a global exception handler you can make sure that no matter what goes wrong, your program has a chance to recover. Similarly a particularly sensitive piece of code (like something that does I/O) could have all sorts of different errors that can only be detected at runtime and you want to catch any possible contingency. Some things might not occur during testing; like what if a server outside of your control fails? This may never be tested before it really happens (although good testing would include this). This is the more important reason really.

  2. Performance. Typically exceptions are implemented so that everything is fast so long as nothing goes wrong. Exceptions are caught after they occur. This means that no 'if' statement has to be evaluated in advance if something goes wrong, and the overhead is very low in that case. If you don't use exceptions you will be forced to add a lot of 'if' statements to your code. While usually this isn't much of a problem, this can kill a performance-critical application. This is especially true because a branch mis-prediction in the CPU can cause a pipeline flush.

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Exception handling: If condition versus Exception isn't specific to PHP, but gives a good perspective. Personally, Exception(s) & try/catch are implemented in languages to enforce good behaviour amongst developers that normally wouldn't be as attentive to error checking / handling.

If you are confident that your if/else if/else is catching all scenarios, than cool.

Here is an overview of the Advantages of Exceptions - Java -- At one point, there is a snippet of code that has many if/else statements and the following excerpt:

There's so much error detection, reporting, and returning here that the original seven lines of code are lost in the clutter. Worse yet, the logical flow of the code has also been lost, thus making it difficult to tell whether the code is doing the right thing: Is the file really being closed if the function fails to allocate enough memory? It's even more difficult to ensure that the code continues to do the right thing when you modify the method three months after writing it. Many programmers solve this problem by simply ignoring it — errors are reported when their programs crash.

So really, it comes down to personal preference in the end. If you want code that is readable and can be consumed by other people, it's generally a better approach and enforces best-behaviour

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We use exception handling if we are not sure about the code results. We put that snippet of code in try block and catch that error in catch block. Please check this link for more information.

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I that reason is that Exception is called after trigger_error(); function and you can send also some additional information to that exception = better debugging?

I'm not sure but I think that's it

example:

class db { function connect() { mysql_Connect("lolcalhost", "root", "pass:)") or trigger_error("Test"); } } try { } catch (db

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One of the primary reasons for having an exceptions framework is so that if the code ever gets to the point where it cannot proceed, it has the ability to tell the surrounding context that something has gone wrong. It means that if I have a class Foo which needs to have $fooInstance->setBarHandler($barHandler) called before $fooInstance->doFoo(); can succeed, the class can provide a message to the greater context instead of failing silently and returning FALSE. Further, it allows the context to say, "Huh. That broke. Well, I can now tell the user/logs/something else that something bad happened, and I can decide whether I need to keep on chugging."

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  1. Exceptions can provide much more data than simple -1 or false.
  2. Exceptions can do advanced error handling. Keep in mind that try .. catch blocks can be nested and there could be more than one catch block in try .. catch block.
  3. Exceptions force you to handle errors. When you're not using them you do something like:

    function doSomething($a, $b, $c) {
        ...
    
        if ($a < $b && $b > $c) {
            return -1; // error
        }
    
        ...
    }
    
    $d = doSomething($x, $y, $z);
    
    if ($d === -1) {
        die('Fatal error!');
    }
    

    And everything is fine as long as you remember to check whether function returned error. But what happen if you forgot to check that? It's actually a quite common problem.

  4. Exceptions make the flow of a program much more natural.

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