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I'm looking for a string similarity algorithm that yields better results on variable length strings than the ones that are usually suggested (levenshtein distance, soundex, etc).

For example,

Given string A: "Robert",

Then string B: "Amy Robertson"

would be a better match than

String C: "Richard"

Also, preferably, this algorithm should be language agnostic (also works in languages other than English).

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15 Answers 15

up vote 84 down vote accepted

Simon White of Catalysoft wrote an article about a very clever algorithm that compares adjacent character pairs that works really well for my purposes:

http://www.catalysoft.com/articles/StrikeAMatch.html

Simon has a Java version of the algorithm and below I wrote a PL/Ruby version of it (taken from the plain ruby version done in the related forum entry comment by Mark Wong-VanHaren) so that I can use it in my PostgreSQL queries:

CREATE FUNCTION string_similarity(str1 varchar, str2 varchar)
RETURNS float8 AS '

str1.downcase! 
pairs1 = (0..str1.length-2).collect {|i| str1[i,2]}.reject {
  |pair| pair.include? " "}
str2.downcase! 
pairs2 = (0..str2.length-2).collect {|i| str2[i,2]}.reject {
  |pair| pair.include? " "}
union = pairs1.size + pairs2.size 
intersection = 0 
pairs1.each do |p1| 
  0.upto(pairs2.size-1) do |i| 
    if p1 == pairs2[i] 
      intersection += 1 
      pairs2.slice!(i) 
      break 
    end 
  end 
end 
(2.0 * intersection) / union

' LANGUAGE 'plruby';

Works like a charm!

share|improve this answer
16  
You found the answer and wrote all that in 4 minutes? Impressive! –  Matt J Mar 17 '09 at 6:26
12  
I prepared my answer after some research and implementation. I put it here to the benefit of whoever else comes looking in SO for a practical answer using an alternative algorithm because most of the answers in related questions seem to revolve around levenshtein or soundex. –  marzagao Mar 19 '09 at 1:24
7  
Just what I have been looking for. Will you marry me? –  sharas Aug 19 '10 at 11:18
1  
FWIW, your algorithm is 5 times faster (according to Benchmark.bmbm over 50,000 repetitions) than the one presented on en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Algorithm_Implementation/Strings/Dice's_coefficient –  Seamus Abshere Oct 20 '11 at 3:51
2  
This returns a "score" of 1 (100% match) when comparing strings having a single isolated letter as difference, like this exemple: string_similarity("vitamin B", "vitamin C") #=> 1, is there an easy way to prevent this kind of behavior? –  MrYoshiji Jul 30 '13 at 20:21

marzagao's aswer is great. I converted it to C# so I thought I'd post it here:

Pastebin Link

/// <summary>
/// This class implements string comparison algorithm
/// based on character pair similarity
/// Source: http://www.catalysoft.com/articles/StrikeAMatch.html
/// </summary>
public class SimilarityTool
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Compares the two strings based on letter pair matches
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="str1"></param>
    /// <param name="str2"></param>
    /// <returns>The percentage match from 0.0 to 1.0 where 1.0 is 100%</returns>
    public double CompareStrings(string str1, string str2)
    {
        List<string> pairs1 = WordLetterPairs(str1.ToUpper());
        List<string> pairs2 = WordLetterPairs(str2.ToUpper());

        int intersection = 0;
        int union = pairs1.Count + pairs2.Count;

        for (int i = 0; i < pairs1.Count; i++)
        {
            for (int j = 0; j < pairs2.Count; j++)
            {
                if (pairs1[i] == pairs2[j])
                {
                    intersection++;
                    pairs2.RemoveAt(j);//Must remove the match to prevent "GGGG" from appearing to match "GG" with 100% success

                    break;
                }
            }
        }

        return (2.0 * intersection) / union;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets all letter pairs for each
    /// individual word in the string
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="str"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    private List<string> WordLetterPairs(string str)
    {
        List<string> AllPairs = new List<string>();

        // Tokenize the string and put the tokens/words into an array
        string[] Words = Regex.Split(str, @"\s");

        // For each word
        for (int w = 0; w < Words.Length; w++)
        {
            if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(Words[w]))
            {
                // Find the pairs of characters
                String[] PairsInWord = LetterPairs(Words[w]);

                for (int p = 0; p < PairsInWord.Length; p++)
                {
                    AllPairs.Add(PairsInWord[p]);
                }
            }
        }

        return AllPairs;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Generates an array containing every 
    /// two consecutive letters in the input string
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="str"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    private string[] LetterPairs(string str)
    {
        int numPairs = str.Length - 1;

        string[] pairs = new string[numPairs];

        for (int i = 0; i < numPairs; i++)
        {
            pairs[i] = str.Substring(i, 2);
        }

        return pairs;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
+100 if I could, you just saved me a hard days work mate! Cheers. –  Varun Vohra Oct 26 '11 at 11:19
1  
Very nice! The only suggestion I have, would to make this into an extension. –  Levitikon Feb 7 '12 at 17:12
    
+1! Great that it works, with slight modifications for Java too. And it does seem to return better responses than Levenshtein. –  Nox Sep 20 '12 at 16:20
    
This is awesome code, works exceptionally great! –  user1662812 Nov 15 '12 at 13:17
1  
I added a version converting this to an extension method below. Thanks for the original version and the awesome translation. –  Frank Rundatz Aug 11 '13 at 22:47

Here is another version of marzagao's answer, this one written in Python:

def get_bigrams(string):
    '''
    Takes a string and returns a list of bigrams
    '''
    s = string.lower()
    return [s[i:i+2] for i in xrange(len(s) - 1)]

def string_similarity(str1, str2):
    '''
    Perform bigram comparison between two strings
    and return a percentage match in decimal form
    '''
    pairs1 = get_bigrams(str1)
    pairs2 = get_bigrams(str2)
    union  = len(pairs1) + len(pairs2)
    hit_count = 0
    for x in pairs1:
        for y in pairs2:
            if x == y:
                hit_count += 1
                break
    return (2.0 * hit_count) / union

if __name__ == "__main__":
    '''
    Run a test using the example taken from:
    http://www.catalysoft.com/articles/StrikeAMatch.html
    '''
    w1 = 'Healed'
    words = ['Heard', 'Healthy', 'Help', 'Herded', 'Sealed', 'Sold']

    for w2 in words:
        print('Healed --- ' + w2)
        print(string_similarity(w1, w2))
        print
share|improve this answer
1  
The shortest of all here. –  xiaomao Dec 1 '12 at 3:09
1  
this. beautiful –  Nirvana Tikku Mar 26 '13 at 2:51
    
There's a small bug in string_similarity when there are duplicate ngrams in a word, resulting in a score >1 for identical strings. Adding a 'break' after "hit_count += 1" fixes it. –  jbaiter May 25 '13 at 19:30
    
@jbaiter: Good catch. I changed it to reflect your changes. –  John Rutledge May 29 '13 at 2:04
1  
In Simon White's article, he says "Note that whenever a match is found, that character pair is removed from the second array list to prevent us from matching against the same character pair multiple times. (Otherwise, 'GGGGG' would score a perfect match against 'GG'.)" I would alter this statement to say that it would give a higher than perfect match. Without taking this into account, it also seems to have the result that the algorithm is not transitive (similarity(x,y) =/= similarity(y,x)). Adding pairs2.remove(y) after the line hit_count += 1 fixes the problem. –  NinjaMeTimbers Jul 9 '13 at 23:32

Here's my PHP implementation of suggested StrikeAMatch algorithm, by Simon White. the advantages (like it says in the link) are:

  • A true reflection of lexical similarity - strings with small differences should be recognised as being similar. In particular, a significant substring overlap should point to a high level of similarity between the strings.

  • A robustness to changes of word order - two strings which contain the same words, but in a different order, should be recognised as being similar. On the other hand, if one string is just a random anagram of the characters contained in the other, then it should (usually) be recognised as dissimilar.

  • Language Independence - the algorithm should work not only in English, but in many different languages.

    <?php
    /**
     * LetterPairSimilarity algorithm implementation in PHP
     * @author Igal Alkon
     * @link http://www.catalysoft.com/articles/StrikeAMatch.html
     */
    class LetterPairSimilarity
    {
        /**
         * @param $str
         * @return mixed
         */
        private function wordLetterPairs($str)
        {
            $allPairs = array();
    
            // Tokenize the string and put the tokens/words into an array
    
            $words = explode(' ', $str);
    
            // For each word
            for ($w = 0; $w < count($words); $w++)
            {
                // Find the pairs of characters
                $pairsInWord = $this->letterPairs($words[$w]);
    
                for ($p = 0; $p < count($pairsInWord); $p++)
                {
                    $allPairs[] = $pairsInWord[$p];
                }
            }
    
            return $allPairs;
        }
    
        /**
         * @param $str
         * @return array
         */
        private function letterPairs($str)
        {
            $numPairs = mb_strlen($str)-1;
            $pairs = array();
    
            for ($i = 0; $i < $numPairs; $i++)
            {
                $pairs[$i] = mb_substr($str,$i,2);
            }
    
            return $pairs;
        }
    
        /**
         * @param $str1
         * @param $str2
         * @return float
         */
        public function compareStrings($str1, $str2)
        {
            $pairs1 = $this->wordLetterPairs(strtoupper($str1));
            $pairs2 = $this->wordLetterPairs(strtoupper($str2));
    
            $intersection = 0;
    
            $union = count($pairs1) + count($pairs2);
    
            for ($i=0; $i < count($pairs1); $i++)
            {
                $pair1 = $pairs1[$i];
    
                $pairs2 = array_values($pairs2);
                for($j = 0; $j < count($pairs2); $j++)
                {
                    $pair2 = $pairs2[$j];
                    if ($pair1 === $pair2)
                    {
                        $intersection++;
                        unset($pairs2[$j]);
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }
    
            return (2.0*$intersection)/$union;
        }
    }
    
share|improve this answer

String Similarity Metrics contains an overview of many different metrics used in string comparison (Wikipedia has an overview as well). Much of these metrics is implemented in a library simmetrics.

Yet another example of metric, not included in the given overview is for example compression distance (attempting to approximate the Kolmogorov's complexity), which can be used for a bit longer texts than the one you presented.

You might also consider looking at a much broader subject of Natural Language Processing. These R packages can get you started quickly (or at least give some ideas).

And one last edit - search the other questions on this subject at SO, there are quite a few related ones.

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A shorter version of @John Rutledge's answer:

def get_bigrams(string):
    '''
    Takes a string and returns a list of bigrams
    '''
    s = string.lower()
    return {s[i:i+2] for i in xrange(len(s) - 1)}

def string_similarity(str1, str2):
    '''
    Perform bigram comparison between two strings
    and return a percentage match in decimal form
    '''
    pairs1 = get_bigrams(str1)
    pairs2 = get_bigrams(str2)
    intersection = pairs1 & pairs2
    return (2.0 * len(intersection)) / (len(pairs1) + len(pairs2))
share|improve this answer

I translated Simon White's algorithm to PL/pgSQL. This is my contribution.

<!-- language: lang-sql -->

create or replace function spt1.letterpairs(in p_str varchar) 
returns varchar  as 
$$
declare

    v_numpairs integer := length(p_str)-1;
    v_pairs varchar[];

begin

    for i in 1 .. v_numpairs loop
        v_pairs[i] := substr(p_str, i, 2);
    end loop;

    return v_pairs;

end;
$$ language 'plpgsql';

--===================================================================

create or replace function spt1.wordletterpairs(in p_str varchar) 
returns varchar as
$$
declare
    v_allpairs varchar[];
    v_words varchar[];
    v_pairsinword varchar[];
begin
    v_words := regexp_split_to_array(p_str, '[[:space:]]');

    for i in 1 .. array_length(v_words, 1) loop
        v_pairsinword := spt1.letterpairs(v_words[i]);

        if v_pairsinword is not null then
            for j in 1 .. array_length(v_pairsinword, 1) loop
                v_allpairs := v_allpairs || v_pairsinword[j];
            end loop;
        end if;

    end loop;


    return v_allpairs;
end;
$$ language 'plpgsql';

--===================================================================

create or replace function spt1.arrayintersect(ANYARRAY, ANYARRAY)
returns anyarray as 
$$
    select array(select unnest($1) intersect select unnest($2))
$$ language 'sql';

--===================================================================

create or replace function spt1.comparestrings(in p_str1 varchar, in p_str2 varchar)
returns float as
$$
declare
    v_pairs1 varchar[];
    v_pairs2 varchar[];
    v_intersection integer;
    v_union integer;
begin
    v_pairs1 := wordletterpairs(upper(p_str1));
    v_pairs2 := wordletterpairs(upper(p_str2));
    v_union := array_length(v_pairs1, 1) + array_length(v_pairs2, 1); 

    v_intersection := array_length(arrayintersect(v_pairs1, v_pairs2), 1);

    return (2.0 * v_intersection / v_union);
end;
$$ language 'plpgsql'; 
share|improve this answer
    
Works on my PostgreSQL that has no plruby support! Thank you! –  hostnik Feb 6 '13 at 8:03
    
Thank you! How would you do this in Oracle SQL? –  olovholm Apr 8 '13 at 14:40

This discussion has been really helpful, thanks. I converted the algorithm to VBA for use with Excel and wrote a few versions of a worksheet function, one for simple comparison of a pair of strings, the other for comparing one string to a range/array of strings. The strSimLookup version returns either the last best match as a string, array index, or similarity metric.

This implementation produces the same results listed in the Amazon example on Simon White's website with a few minor exceptions on low-scoring matches; not sure where the difference creeps in, could be VBA's Split function, but I haven't investigated as it's working fine for my purposes.

'Implements functions to rate how similar two strings are on
'a scale of 0.0 (completely dissimilar) to 1.0 (exactly similar)
'Source:   http://www.catalysoft.com/articles/StrikeAMatch.html
'Author: Bob Chatham, bob.chatham at gmail.com
'9/12/2010

Option Explicit

Public Function stringSimilarity(str1 As String, str2 As String) As Variant
'Simple version of the algorithm that computes the similiarity metric
'between two strings.
'NOTE: This verision is not efficient to use if you're comparing one string
'with a range of other values as it will needlessly calculate the pairs for the
'first string over an over again; use the array-optimized version for this case.

    Dim sPairs1 As Collection
    Dim sPairs2 As Collection

    Set sPairs1 = New Collection
    Set sPairs2 = New Collection

    WordLetterPairs str1, sPairs1
    WordLetterPairs str2, sPairs2

    stringSimilarity = SimilarityMetric(sPairs1, sPairs2)

    Set sPairs1 = Nothing
    Set sPairs2 = Nothing

End Function

Public Function strSimA(str1 As Variant, rRng As Range) As Variant
'Return an array of string similarity indexes for str1 vs every string in input range rRng
    Dim sPairs1 As Collection
    Dim sPairs2 As Collection
    Dim arrOut As Variant
    Dim l As Long, j As Long

    Set sPairs1 = New Collection

    WordLetterPairs CStr(str1), sPairs1

    l = rRng.Count
    ReDim arrOut(1 To l)
    For j = 1 To l
        Set sPairs2 = New Collection
        WordLetterPairs CStr(rRng(j)), sPairs2
        arrOut(j) = SimilarityMetric(sPairs1, sPairs2)
        Set sPairs2 = Nothing
    Next j

    strSimA = Application.Transpose(arrOut)

End Function

Public Function strSimLookup(str1 As Variant, rRng As Range, Optional returnType) As Variant
'Return either the best match or the index of the best match
'depending on returnTYype parameter) between str1 and strings in rRng)
' returnType = 0 or omitted: returns the best matching string
' returnType = 1           : returns the index of the best matching string
' returnType = 2           : returns the similarity metric

    Dim sPairs1 As Collection
    Dim sPairs2 As Collection
    Dim metric, bestMetric As Double
    Dim i, iBest As Long
    Const RETURN_STRING As Integer = 0
    Const RETURN_INDEX As Integer = 1
    Const RETURN_METRIC As Integer = 2

    If IsMissing(returnType) Then returnType = RETURN_STRING

    Set sPairs1 = New Collection

    WordLetterPairs CStr(str1), sPairs1

    bestMetric = -1
    iBest = -1

    For i = 1 To rRng.Count
        Set sPairs2 = New Collection
        WordLetterPairs CStr(rRng(i)), sPairs2
        metric = SimilarityMetric(sPairs1, sPairs2)
        If metric > bestMetric Then
            bestMetric = metric
            iBest = i
        End If
        Set sPairs2 = Nothing
    Next i

    If iBest = -1 Then
        strSimLookup = CVErr(xlErrValue)
        Exit Function
    End If

    Select Case returnType
    Case RETURN_STRING
        strSimLookup = CStr(rRng(iBest))
    Case RETURN_INDEX
        strSimLookup = iBest
    Case Else
        strSimLookup = bestMetric
    End Select

End Function

Public Function strSim(str1 As String, str2 As String) As Variant
    Dim ilen, iLen1, ilen2 As Integer

    iLen1 = Len(str1)
    ilen2 = Len(str2)

    If iLen1 >= ilen2 Then ilen = ilen2 Else ilen = iLen1

    strSim = stringSimilarity(Left(str1, ilen), Left(str2, ilen))

End Function

Sub WordLetterPairs(str As String, pairColl As Collection)
'Tokenize str into words, then add all letter pairs to pairColl

    Dim Words() As String
    Dim word, nPairs, pair As Integer

    Words = Split(str)

    If UBound(Words) < 0 Then
        Set pairColl = Nothing
        Exit Sub
    End If

    For word = 0 To UBound(Words)
        nPairs = Len(Words(word)) - 1
        If nPairs > 0 Then
            For pair = 1 To nPairs
                pairColl.Add Mid(Words(word), pair, 2)
            Next pair
        End If
    Next word

End Sub

Private Function SimilarityMetric(sPairs1 As Collection, sPairs2 As Collection) As Variant
'Helper function to calculate similarity metric given two collections of letter pairs.
'This function is designed to allow the pair collections to be set up separately as needed.
'NOTE: sPairs2 collection will be altered as pairs are removed; copy the collection
'if this is not the desired behavior.
'Also assumes that collections will be deallocated somewhere else

    Dim Intersect As Double
    Dim Union As Double
    Dim i, j As Long

    If sPairs1.Count = 0 Or sPairs2.Count = 0 Then
        SimilarityMetric = CVErr(xlErrNA)
        Exit Function
    End If

    Union = sPairs1.Count + sPairs2.Count
    Intersect = 0

    For i = 1 To sPairs1.Count
        For j = 1 To sPairs2.Count
            If StrComp(sPairs1(i), sPairs2(j)) = 0 Then
                Intersect = Intersect + 1
                sPairs2.Remove j
                Exit For
            End If
        Next j
    Next i

    SimilarityMetric = (2 * Intersect) / Union

End Function
share|improve this answer

A faster PHP version of the algorithm:

/**
 *
 * @param $str
 * @return mixed
 */
private static function wordLetterPairs ($str)
{
    $allPairs = array();

    // Tokenize the string and put the tokens/words into an array

    $words = explode(' ', $str);

    // For each word
    for ($w = 0; $w < count($words); $w ++) {
        // Find the pairs of characters
        $pairsInWord = self::letterPairs($words[$w]);

        for ($p = 0; $p < count($pairsInWord); $p ++) {
            $allPairs[$pairsInWord[$p]] = $pairsInWord[$p];
        }
    }

    return array_values($allPairs);
}

/**
 *
 * @param $str
 * @return array
 */
private static function letterPairs ($str)
{
    $numPairs = mb_strlen($str) - 1;
    $pairs = array();

    for ($i = 0; $i < $numPairs; $i ++) {
        $pairs[$i] = mb_substr($str, $i, 2);
    }

    return $pairs;
}

/**
 *
 * @param $str1
 * @param $str2
 * @return float
 */
public static function compareStrings ($str1, $str2)
{
    $pairs1 = self::wordLetterPairs(mb_strtolower($str1));
    $pairs2 = self::wordLetterPairs(mb_strtolower($str2));


    $union = count($pairs1) + count($pairs2);

    $intersection = count(array_intersect($pairs1, $pairs2));

    return (2.0 * $intersection) / $union;
}

For the data I had (approx 2300 comparisons) I had a running time of 0.58sec with Igal Alkon solution versus 0.35sec with mine.

share|improve this answer

Building on Michael La Voie's awesome C# version, as per the request to make it an extension method, here is what I came up with. The primary benefit of doing it this way is that you can sort a Generic List by the percent match. For example, consider you have a string field named "City" in your object. A user searches for "Chester" and you want to return results in descending order of match. For example, you want literal matches of Chester to show up before Rochester. To do this, add two new properties to your object:

    public string SearchText { get; set; }
    public double PercentMatch
    {
        get
        {
            return City.ToUpper().PercentMatchTo(this.SearchText.ToUpper());
        }
    }

Then on each object, set the SearchText to what the user searched for. Then you can sort it easily with something like:

    zipcodes = zipcodes.OrderByDescending(x => x.PercentMatch);

Here's the slight modification to make it an extension method:

    /// <summary>
    /// This class implements string comparison algorithm
    /// based on character pair similarity
    /// Source: http://www.catalysoft.com/articles/StrikeAMatch.html
    /// </summary>
    public static double PercentMatchTo(this string str1, string str2)
    {
        List<string> pairs1 = WordLetterPairs(str1.ToUpper());
        List<string> pairs2 = WordLetterPairs(str2.ToUpper());

        int intersection = 0;
        int union = pairs1.Count + pairs2.Count;

        for (int i = 0; i < pairs1.Count; i++)
        {
            for (int j = 0; j < pairs2.Count; j++)
            {
                if (pairs1[i] == pairs2[j])
                {
                    intersection++;
                    pairs2.RemoveAt(j);//Must remove the match to prevent "GGGG" from appearing to match "GG" with 100% success

                    break;
                }
            }
        }

        return (2.0 * intersection) / union;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets all letter pairs for each
    /// individual word in the string
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="str"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    private static List<string> WordLetterPairs(string str)
    {
        List<string> AllPairs = new List<string>();

        // Tokenize the string and put the tokens/words into an array
        string[] Words = Regex.Split(str, @"\s");

        // For each word
        for (int w = 0; w < Words.Length; w++)
        {
            if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(Words[w]))
            {
                // Find the pairs of characters
                String[] PairsInWord = LetterPairs(Words[w]);

                for (int p = 0; p < PairsInWord.Length; p++)
                {
                    AllPairs.Add(PairsInWord[p]);
                }
            }
        }

        return AllPairs;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Generates an array containing every 
    /// two consecutive letters in the input string
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="str"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    private static  string[] LetterPairs(string str)
    {
        int numPairs = str.Length - 1;

        string[] pairs = new string[numPairs];

        for (int i = 0; i < numPairs; i++)
        {
            pairs[i] = str.Substring(i, 2);
        }

        return pairs;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @frankrun, looks good :) –  Michael La Voie Aug 12 '13 at 21:26
    
I think you would be better off using a bool isCaseSensitive with a default value of false - even if it's true the implementation is much cleaner –  Martin Apr 30 at 20:27

What about Levenshtein distance, divided by the length of the first string (or alternatively divided my min/max/avg length of both strings)? That has worked for me so far.

share|improve this answer
    
However, to quote another post on this topic, what it returns is often "erratic". It ranks 'echo' as quite similar to 'dog'. –  Nox Sep 20 '12 at 16:28
    
@Nox: The "divided by the length of the first string" portion of this reply is significant. Also, this performs better than the much-lauded Dice's algorithm for typos and transposition errors, and even common conjugations (consider comparing "swim" and "swam", for example). –  Logan Pickup Jul 19 '13 at 0:17

Hey guys i gave this a try in javascript, but I'm new to it, anyone know faster ways to do it?

function get_bigrams(string) {
    // Takes a string and returns a list of bigrams
    var s = string.toLowerCase();
    var v = new Array(s.length-1);
    for (i = 0; i< v.length; i++){
        v[i] =s.slice(i,i+2);
    }
    return v;
}

function string_similarity(str1, str2){
    /*
    Perform bigram comparison between two strings
    and return a percentage match in decimal form
    */
    var pairs1 = get_bigrams(str1);
    var pairs2 = get_bigrams(str2);
    var union = pairs1.length + pairs2.length;
    var hit_count = 0;
    for (x in pairs1){
        for (y in pairs2){
            if (pairs1[x] == pairs2[y]){
                hit_count++;
            }
        }
    }
    return ((2.0 * hit_count) / union);
}


var w1 = 'Healed';
var word =['Heard','Healthy','Help','Herded','Sealed','Sold']
for (w2 in word){
    console.log('Healed --- ' + word[w2])
    console.log(string_similarity(w1,word[w2]));
}
share|improve this answer
    
This implementation is incorrect. The bigram function breaks for input of length 0. The string_similarity method does not properly break inside the second loop, which may lead to counting pairs multiple times, leading to a return value which exceeds 100%. And you've also forgotten to declare x and y, and you should not loop through loops using a for..in.. loop (use for(..;..;..) instead). –  Rob W Feb 23 '13 at 21:17

The Dice coefficient algorithm (Simon White / marzagao's answer) is implemented in Ruby in the pair_distance_similar method in the amatch gem

https://github.com/flori/amatch

This gem also contains implementations of a number of approximate matching and string comparison algorithms: Levenshtein edit distance, Sellers edit distance, the Hamming distance, the longest common subsequence length, the longest common substring length, the pair distance metric, the Jaro-Winkler metric.

share|improve this answer

A version in beautiful Scala:

  def pairDistance(s1: String, s2: String): Double = {

    def strToPairs(s: String, acc: List[String]): List[String] = {
      if (s.size < 2) acc
      else strToPairs(s.drop(1),
        if (s.take(2).contains(" ")) acc else acc ::: List(s.take(2)))
    }

    val lst1 = strToPairs(s1.toUpperCase, List())
    val lst2 = strToPairs(s2.toUpperCase, List())

    (2.0 * lst2.intersect(lst1).size) / (lst1.size + lst2.size)

  }
share|improve this answer

My JavaScript implementation takes a string or array of strings, and an optional floor (the default floor is 0.5). If you pass it a string, it will return true or false depending on whether or not the string's similarity score is greater than or equal to the floor. If you pass it an array of strings, it will return an array of those strings whose similarity score is greater than or equal to the floor, sorted by score.

Examples:

'Healed'.fuzzy('Sealed');      // returns true
'Healed'.fuzzy('Help');        // returns false
'Healed'.fuzzy('Help', 0.25);  // returns true

'Healed'.fuzzy(['Sold', 'Herded', 'Heard', 'Help', 'Sealed', 'Healthy']);
// returns ["Sealed", "Healthy"]

'Healed'.fuzzy(['Sold', 'Herded', 'Heard', 'Help', 'Sealed', 'Healthy'], 0);
// returns ["Sealed", "Healthy", "Heard", "Herded", "Help", "Sold"]

Here it is:

(function(){
  var default_floor = 0.5;

  function pairs(str){
    var pairs = []
      , length = str.length - 1
      , pair;
    str = str.toLowerCase();
    for(var i = 0; i < length; i++){
      pair = str.substr(i, 2);
      if(!/\s/.test(pair)){
        pairs.push(pair);
      }
    }
    return pairs;
  }

  function similarity(pairs1, pairs2){
    var union = pairs1.length + pairs2.length
      , hits = 0;

    for(var i = 0; i < pairs1.length; i++){
      for(var j = 0; j < pairs1.length; j++){
        if(pairs1[i] == pairs2[j]){
          pairs2.splice(j--, 1);
          hits++;
          break;
        }
      }
    }
    return 2*hits/union || 0;
  }

  String.prototype.fuzzy = function(strings, floor){
    var str1 = this
      , pairs1 = pairs(this);

    floor = typeof floor == 'number' ? floor : default_floor;

    if(typeof(strings) == 'string'){
      return str1.length > 1 && strings.length > 1 && similarity(pairs1, pairs(strings)) >= floor || str1.toLowerCase() == strings.toLowerCase();
    }else if(strings instanceof Array){
      var scores = {};

      strings.map(function(str2){
        scores[str2] = str1.length > 1 ? similarity(pairs1, pairs(str2)) : 1*(str1.toLowerCase() == str2.toLowerCase());
      });

      return strings.filter(function(str){
        return scores[str] >= floor;
      }).sort(function(a, b){
        return scores[b] - scores[a];
      });
    }
  };
})();

And here's a minified version for your convenience:

(function(){function g(a){var b=[],e=a.length-1,d;a=a.toLowerCase();for(var c=0;c<e;c++)d=a.substr(c,2),/\s/.test(d)||b.push(d);return b}function h(a,b){for(var e=a.length+b.length,d=0,c=0;c<a.length;c++)for(var f=0;f<a.length;f++)if(a[c]==b[f]){b.splice(f--,1);d++;break}return 2*d/e||0}String.prototype.fuzzy=function(a,b){var e=this,d=g(this);b="number"==typeof b?b:0.5;if("string"==typeof a)return 1<e.length&&1<a.length&&h(d,g(a))>=b||e.toLowerCase()==a.toLowerCase();if(a instanceof Array){var c={};a.map(function(a){c[a]=1<e.length?h(d,g(a)):1*(e.toLowerCase()==a.toLowerCase())});return a.filter(function(a){return c[a]>=b}).sort(function(a,b){return c[b]-c[a]})}}})();
share|improve this answer
    
just what i needed, thanks for sharing –  TMichel Jun 26 at 8:12

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