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public class Foo
{
    public string FooId{get;set;}
    public Boo Boo{get;set;}
}


public class Boo
{
    public string BooId{get;set;}
    public Foo Foo{get;set;}
}

I was trying to do this in Entity Framework when I got the error:

Unable to determine the principal end of an association between the types 'ConsoleApplication5.Boo' and 'ConsoleApplication5.Foo'. The principal end of this association must be explicitly configured using either the relationship fluent API or data annotations.

I have seen questions on StackOverflow with a solution for this error, but I want to understand what the term "principal end" means.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 117 down vote accepted

In one-to-one relation one end must be principal and second end must be dependent. Principal end is the one which will be inserted first and which can exist without the dependent one. Dependent end is the one which must be inserted after the principal because it has foreign key to the principal.

In case of entity framework FK in dependent must also be its PK so in your case you should use:

public class Boo
{
    [Key, ForeignKey("Foo")]
    public string BooId{get;set;}
    public Foo Foo{get;set;}
}

Or fluent mapping

modelBuilder.Entity<Foo>()
            .HasOptional(f => f.Boo)
            .WithRequired(s => s.Foo);
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thanks, now i also understood the "foreign key vs independent association" article on your blog :) –  taher chhabrawala Jun 30 '11 at 9:54
    
@Ladislav, I need to make two independant tables that both have an optional reference to each other (one to one), I want them both to have their own PKs each, how is this possible? I posted a separate question. –  Shimmy Nov 28 '12 at 16:15
3  
You have no idea how many hours it took to find an answer to this - ms documentation is POOOOOOP ty. –  gangelo May 15 '13 at 17:25
    
Note you may need to add using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations.Schema; to get ForeignKey in VS2012 –  Stuart Dobson Jun 28 '13 at 23:37
1  
@bflemi3 you are correct Boo is the dependent, requires a Foo, and gets the foreign key. Foo is the principal and can exist without a Boo. –  Colin Nov 18 '13 at 10:07
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You can also use the [Required] data annotation attribute to solve this:

public class Foo
{
    public string FooId { get; set; }

    public Boo Boo { get; set; }
}

public class Boo
{
    public string BooId { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public Foo Foo {get; set; }
}

Foo is required for Boo.

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3  
+1 Did it for me –  ta.speot.is Jan 25 '13 at 1:59
1  
found couple of answer on SO - this is the best and simplest! –  bong Jun 26 '13 at 6:42
1  
Well that did it :) Thanks! –  Gorgi Rankovski Aug 1 '13 at 14:24
    
This was correct for my following code where I wanted a map between the two as a separate entity public class Organisation { public int Id { get; set; }} public class user { public int Id { get; set; }} public class UserGroup { [Key] public int Id { get; set; } [Required] public virtual Organisation Organisation { get; set; } [Required] public virtual User User { get; set; } } –  AndyM Jul 10 at 12:54
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In edmx designer set correcspondent properties not public (internal or private). Maybe this approach will also work with POCO model.

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It looks like you can't have a 0..1 to 0..1 relationship. It appears that you have to have at least one side be required. Seems less than ideal.

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