Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am writing a function to compare the contents of two lists. The order of the elements don't matter, so I sort them before I compare. The lists can be of normal types list<int>, but also be lists of lists list<list<int> >.

Here is a complete stripped down example:

#include <list>

template <typename T>
bool lessThanInAnyOrder(T lhs, T rhs)
{
  return lhs < rhs;
}

template <typename T>
bool lessThanInAnyOrder(std::list<T> lhs, std::list<T> rhs)
{
  lhs.sort(lessThanInAnyOrder<T>);
  rhs.sort(lessThanInAnyOrder<T>);

  //Do comparisons here, but for now just:
  return false;
}

int main()
{
  std::list<int> list1;
  std::list<int> list2;
  lessThanInAnyOrder(list1, list2);
}

This compiles in GCC 4.3.3, but in Visual Studio 2008, it gives the following compilation error where I'm calling lhs.sort():

error C2660: 'std::list<_Ty>::sort' : function does not take 1 arguments

Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
Perfectly compiles for me using g++ (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.5.2-8ubuntu4) 4.5.2 –  Draco Ater Jun 30 '11 at 8:47
    
@Draco Ater, doesn't compile on ideone.com/Hx5St –  iammilind Jun 30 '11 at 8:50
    
I am using Visual Studio 2008. Updated the question with that information now. –  knatten Jun 30 '11 at 8:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Wrap the function in std::ptr_fun with explicit type arguments:

lhs.sort(std::ptr_fun<T, T>(lessThanInAnyOrder<T>));
share|improve this answer

First off: I suppose if you want to compare collections regardless of their ordering, you might be looking for std::set with the set_difference, set_intersection, set_union and set_symmetric_difference algorithms

To your question

You're trying to implement sort-by-policy; if you cannot simply specialize std::less<> (which exists for that exact purpose), you could knock off a custom policy yourself: (code running on codepad.org)

#include <list>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm>

namespace applogic
{
    template <typename T>
    struct sort_policy
    {
        typedef std::less<T> predicate_t;
    };

    template <> struct sort_policy<std::string>
    {
        struct _Cmp { bool operator()(const std::string& a, const std::string& b) { return a.length()>b.length(); } };
        typedef _Cmp predicate_t;
    };

    template <typename C>
        void sort(C& cont)
    {
        typedef typename sort_policy<typename C::value_type>::predicate_t P;
        std::sort(cont.begin(), cont.end(), P());
    }

    template <typename T>
        void sort(std::list<T>& cont)
    {
        typedef typename sort_policy<T>::predicate_t P;
        cont.sort(P());
    }
}

template <class C>
    static void dump(const C& cont, const std::string& msg="")
{
    std::cout << msg;
    std::copy(cont.begin(), cont.end(), std::ostream_iterator<typename C::value_type>(std::cout, ", "));
    std::cout << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
    using applogic::sort;

    std::vector<int> ints;
    ints.push_back(13);
    ints.push_back(-3);
    ints.push_back(7);

    dump(ints, "before: ");
    sort(ints);
    dump(ints, "after: ");

    std::list<std::string> strings;
    strings.push_back("very very long");
    strings.push_back("tiny");
    strings.push_back("medium size");

    dump(strings, "before: ");
    sort(strings);
    dump(strings, "after: ");

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Compilation fails because compiler can't select overloaded 'lessThanInAnyOrder' function to pass to list::sort. You'll have to specify it's type explicitly like here.

template <typename T>
bool lessThanInAnyOrder(std::list<T> lhs, std::list<T> rhs)
{
  bool (*comparer)(T, T) = &lessThanInAnyOrder<T>;
  lhs.sort(comparer);
  rhs.sort(comparer);
 
  //Do comparisons here, but for now just:
  return false;
}
share|improve this answer

My guess, for int type you can simply write like this:

lhs.sort();
rhs.sort();

Demo.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but lhs and rhs could be of type list<list<int> >. In that case, I need to use lessThanInAnyOrder<list<int> > as the predicate. –  knatten Jun 30 '11 at 8:46
    
@knatten, I suspect list<int>.sort(compare) may not be defined (as it's not needed). So You can overload lessThanInAnyOrder<int>. Thus for int it will call sort() and for others it will call sort(compare). –  iammilind Jun 30 '11 at 8:48
    
list<int>.sort(compare) does indeed work. Proof-of-concept: bool intCompare(int lhs, int rhs) { return lhs < rhs; } list1.sort(intCompare); –  knatten Jun 30 '11 at 8:59
    
It is needed even for list<int> if you want to sort the ints in some other order, like largest value first. –  Bo Persson Jun 30 '11 at 9:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.