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How to calculate IP Addresses of Mac OSX and Linux using python. I would like to get IPv4 and IPv6 addresses both.

Thanks.

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1  
If your going to down vote. Comment why! –  Jakob Bowyer Jun 30 '11 at 8:59
    
If you mean you want your local IP address, see this question. If you want a remote IP, you should tell us how you're connecting to it (e.g., are you using raw sockets, or one of the higher level libraries such as httplib?). –  Blair Jun 30 '11 at 9:07
    
to be precise, I want computer interface's IP addresses. –  daranee somjaipheng Jun 30 '11 at 9:23
    
I found the answer to this question here raspberrypi.stackexchange.com/a/6715/112 –  David Sykes Jun 20 at 6:49
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use this script

#!/usr/bin/env python
import platform
import subprocess

commands = {
    'Darwin': {'ipv4': "ifconfig  | grep -E 'inet.[0-9]' | grep -v '127.0.0.1' | awk '{ print $2}'", 'ipv6': "ifconfig  | grep -E 'inet6.[0-9]' | grep -v 'fe80:' | awk '{ print $2}'"},
    'Linux': {'ipv4': "/sbin/ifconfig  | grep 'inet addr:'| grep -v '127.0.0.1' | cut -d: -f2 | awk '{ print $1}'", 'ipv6': "/sbin/ifconfig  | grep 'inet6 addr:'| grep 'Global' | grep -v 'fe80' | awk '{print $3}'"}
}

def ip_addresses(version):
    proc = subprocess.Popen(commands[platform.system()][version], shell=True,stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
    return proc.communicate()[0].replace('\n', '')

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print ip_addresses('ipv4')
    print ip_addresses('ipv6')
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1  
Kinda dislike this method because you have to give it a string argument. You could write them as separate functions ipv4 and ipv6 –  Jakob Bowyer Jun 30 '11 at 9:00
    
Thanks Jakob. I have done this way for simple understanding. Yes you can pass as argument and grep out fe80. Do you have any better way. –  Pujan Srivastava Jun 30 '11 at 9:02
    
I'm sorry, but this looks horrible. Code duplication all over the place, a list that is never actually used. Also, on Linux, passing 'ipv6' will return None. –  Robin Jun 30 '11 at 9:02
    
Thanks Robin. I remove those lines. –  Pujan Srivastava Jun 30 '11 at 9:04
1  
Well. OP did not ask for Windows –  Pujan Srivastava Jun 30 '11 at 9:06
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Not sure if this is any good, but here's a simplified version of Punjan's script:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import os
import platform
import subprocess

commands = {
    'Darwin': {'ipv4': "ifconfig  | grep -E 'inet.[0-9]' | grep -v '127.0.0.1' | awk '{ print $2}'", 'ipv6': "ifconfig  | grep -E 'inet6.[0-9]' | grep -v 'fe80:' | awk '{ print $2}'"},
    'Linux': {'ipv4': "/sbin/ifconfig  | grep 'inet addr:'| grep -v '127.0.0.1' | cut -d: -f2 | awk '{ print $1}'", 'ipv6': "/sbin/ifconfig  | grep 'inet6 addr:'| grep 'Global' | grep -v 'fe80' | awk '{print $3}'"}
}

def ip_addresses(version):
    proc = subprocess.Popen(commands[platform.system()][version], shell=True,stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
    return proc.communicate()[0].replace('\n', '')

def ipv4_addresses():
    return ip_adddresses('ipv4')

def ipv6_addresses():
    return ip_adddresses('ipv6')

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print ipv4_addresses()
    print ipv6_addresses()
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You made the same mistake he did! Separate the ipv4 and ipv6 into different functions –  Jakob Bowyer Jun 30 '11 at 9:12
    
I'm not sure how that is a mistake here, but there you go. Extra code duplication! –  Robin Jun 30 '11 at 9:34
    
+1 for simpler version –  daranee somjaipheng Jun 30 '11 at 9:39
    
It means I can import your script, I can just use a specific function without having to give any arguments. –  Jakob Bowyer Jun 30 '11 at 9:59
    
How about the latest edit? Very little duplication, and convenience functions provided. –  Robin Jun 30 '11 at 11:49
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Batteries included!

import socket

print socket.gethostbyaddr(socket.getfqdn())

edit: Based on comments, the original answer wasn't reliable. Updated.

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1  
Returns '127.0.0.1' on my os. Not a reliable answer. –  Jakob Bowyer Jun 30 '11 at 9:07
    
    
@Blair: I just searched the stdlib docs. Maybe flag to close this question then? –  redacted Jun 30 '11 at 9:17
    
-1 : because your code is not returning IPv6 address. –  Pujan Srivastava Jun 30 '11 at 9:19
    
@Pujan, please don't abuse the voting system, read the guidelines... –  Dog eat cat world Jun 30 '11 at 10:53
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