Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Typically when I need to mock out a class for testing, I'll use a library such as Rhino Mocks. Here I have a class called MyService that expects a IEmailSender.

public class MyService
{
    private readonly IEmailSender sender;

    public MyService(IEmailSender sender)
    {
        this.sender = sender;
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        this.sender.SendEmail();
    }
}

If I needed to test the interaction between these two objects, my test would look something like this:

[TestMethod]
public void Start_Test_Using_Rhino_Mocks()
{
    IEmailSender emailSender = MockRepository.GenerateMock<IEmailSender>();

    MyService service = new MyService(emailSender);
    service.Start();

    emailSender.AssertWasCalled
        (
            x => x.SendEmail(),
            c => c.Repeat.Once()
        );
}

In the test above, I'm using Rhino Mocks to generate the mock and assert that the SendEmail() method was called once.

But what if I could not use Rhino Mocks and had to create manual mocks?

public class MockEmailSender : IEmailSender
{
    public void SendEmail()
    {
    }
}

[TestMethod]
public void Start_Test_Using_Manual_Mocks()
{
    MockEmailSender emailSender = new MockEmailSender();

    MyService service = new MyService(emailSender);
    service.Start();

    // How do I test the interaction?
}

With the mock that I created manually, how would I verify that the SendEmail() method was called? I could put my assertions in the SendEmail() method of the mock, but that would make the test hard to understand since I don't immediately see what's going on when I look at the test.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A very simple solution would have your manual mock just be a stateholder, with counters for the calls to each method. But it's fragile ...

public class MockEmailSender : IEmailSender
{
    public int SendCount = 0;

    public void SendMail(...)
    {
        SendCount++;
    }

    // ... other IEmailSender methods ...
}

Then just query SendCount after making your method call, and making sure that it's == 1.

Remember, Rhino Mocks is creating this dynamically for you -- if you do it manually you have to react to interface changes before compile time, by hand.

share|improve this answer

I think that you have no other option than setting a flag in "SendEmail()", and checking that flag from the test throgh a new method of MockEmailSender like "sendMailWasInvoked()" or something like this (which is in fact a kind of "verify"). You can extend this to count the number of invokations, parameters...

share|improve this answer

well i would advise against creating any manual Mocks (because if you add new method to interface, it gets broken).

if you really have to do it, when expose some counter/bool in your MockEmailSender and you can Assert it later on.

Assert.IsTrue(emailSender.IsCalled)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.