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Let's say I have a Java class A, which requires a helper class B. That helper class is only used in A, and has no other purpose. Also, B doesn't need to use A in any way (don't call methods or access fields).

So, the question is: where to put B?

There are the following options:

  1. Static nested class. In my opinion, it just makes code less clear (much more indentation and such).

    public class A {
        ...
        private static class B { ... }
    }
    
  2. Non-public class in the same source. I like this option.

    public class A {
        ...            
    }
    
    class B { 
        ... 
    }
    
  3. Non-public class in the separate source. Looks like this option has a little overhead, though.

    // A.java
    public class A {
        ...            
    }
    
    // B.java
    class B { 
        ... 
    }
    

For now, I prefer the 2nd option. What are your thoughts on it? What is the best practice? Are there any authoritative sources on it?

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1  
Also, let's consider B to be rather small - it's quite clear that a really large class should get it's own source file, no matter how it's used. –  Andy Jun 30 '11 at 9:53
    
@Everyone... is class B at option B really private? I think they have just default scope (can be used by other classes of the package). –  SJuan76 Jun 30 '11 at 9:55
    
@SJuan76 ya, just default scope. –  aps Jun 30 '11 at 9:57
    
@SJuan76, @aps: yep, you're right:=) So, the second option really has a flaw. –  Andy Jun 30 '11 at 10:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I strongly vote for option (1). The idea is, that class B is only needed by class A and option (1) is the only alternative that clearly expresses that intention: class B is part of class A.

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Yep, and it seems to be the only option to enforce no access other than from class A. –  Andy Jun 30 '11 at 10:07

You can use a static nested class within A.Better encapsulation since a nested class a way of logically grouping classes that are only used in just one place. does your helper class just contain fields?

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I don't understand what you meant by "You can use a static nested class within B". Do you mean "within A"? –  Andy Jun 30 '11 at 10:01
    
oh ya, sorry.i meant A. –  aps Jun 30 '11 at 10:02
    
About helper class. Actually, B just extends abstract class and implements one of its methods (the implementation is rather trivial, though). Then A calls B. –  Andy Jun 30 '11 at 10:03
    
And A cannot extend that absract class directly, encapsulation is needed there. –  Andy Jun 30 '11 at 10:04
    
It's always better to keep nested classes simple. If the class is simple and is used in just one place, go ahead and make it a nested class. –  aps Jun 30 '11 at 10:11

was it helpful?

There are no serious disadvantages, but one can certainly figure out at least few including:

  • Difficult to understand - especially for non-experiences programmers, who may find it difficult to code, enhance, and maintain.
  • More number of classes - it certainly increases the total number of classes being used by the application. For every class loaded into the memory, JVM creates an object of type Class for it. There may be some other routine tasks, which JVM might be required to do for all the extra classes. This may result in a slightly slower performance if the application is using several nested/inner classes (may be due to a poor design).
  • Limited support by the Tools/IDE - Nested classes don't enjoy the same support as the top-level classes get in most of the tools and IDEs. This may irritate the developer at times.
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Unfortunately, no. This article only describes what a static nested class is, but doesn't give any insight on what should be used in the described case. –  Andy Jun 30 '11 at 9:57

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