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#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <fstream>

using namespace std;

int main() {
    string x;
    getline(cin,x);
    ofstream o("f:/demo.txt");
    o.write( (char*)&x , sizeof(x) );
}

I get the unexpected output.I don't get what i write in a string function. Why is this ? Please explain .

Like when i write steve pro i get the output as 8/ steve pro ÌÌÌÌÌÌ ÌÌÌÌ in the file

I expect that the output be steve pro

share|improve this question
3  
What unexpected output? Why didn't you tell us what output you got? – Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 30 '11 at 9:59
3  
Who on earth voted to close as "not a real question"? – Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 30 '11 at 10:10
1  
There is no badge for closing questions. I don't understand what creates trigger-happy close voters. – R. Martinho Fernandes Jun 30 '11 at 10:11
    
@Tomalak - the question was edited to give more information, that close vote was likely before that edit. – Dominic Rodger Jun 30 '11 at 10:19
2  
@Dominic: When I answered this question, three minutes after it was posted, it had more than enough information to answer and no close vote. – Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 30 '11 at 10:23
up vote 9 down vote accepted

You are treating an std::string like something that it is not. It's a complex object that, somewhere in its internals, stores characters for you.

There is no reason to assume that a character array is at the start of the object (&x), and the sizeof the object has no relation to how many characters it may indirectly hold/represent.

You're probably looking for:

o.write(x.c_str(), x.length());

Or just use the built-in formatted I/O mechanism:

o << x;
share|improve this answer
    
yes ! i was looking for o.write(x.c_str(), x.length()); . but what is c_str and why i can't use sizeof(x) ? – program-o-steve Jun 30 '11 at 10:13
1  
@steve: .c_str() is the member function of std::string that gives you a char const* to use with C-style APIs (and with things like iostream .write). You can't just randomly cast complex objects to char* -- you have to obtain an actual pointer to a valid buffer; the std::string documentation explains this. And sizeof is not the length of the string, but the size of the physical std::string object. | I'm still sure that you're actually looking for o << x; don't ignore it just because you haven't seen it before. Proper usage of streams should be covered in your C++ book. – Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 30 '11 at 10:16
    
@ Tomalak Geret'kal Which is better to use o.write(x.c_str(), x.length()); or o << x; ? – program-o-steve Jun 30 '11 at 10:41
    
@steve, o << x is better because it's less error prone, readable and more C++ style ! – iammilind Jun 30 '11 at 10:53
1  
@steve: Neither is "better". The former is "unformatted I/O", and thus suitable for writing binary data. The latter is "formatted I/O", designed for easy, concise output of text data. You have text data, so that's what I'd recommend for use. – Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 30 '11 at 11:02

You seem to have an incorrect model of sizeof, so let me try to get it right.

For any given object x of type T, the expression sizeof(x) is a compile-time constant. C++ will never actually inspect the object x at runtime. The compiler knows that x is of type T, so you can imagine it silently transforming sizeof(x) to sizeof(T), if you will.

#include <string>

int main()
{
    std::string a = "hello";
    std::string b = "Stack Overflow is for professional and enthusiast programmers, people who write code because they love it.";
    std::cout << sizeof(a) << std::endl;   // this prints 4 on my system
    std::cout << sizeof(b) << std::endl;   // this also prints 4 on my system
}

All C++ objects of the same type take up the exact amount of memory. Of course, since strings have vastly different lengths, they will internally store a pointer to a heap-allocated block of memory. But this does not concern sizeof. It couldn't, because as I said, sizeof operates at compile-time.

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't understand your answer. what do you mean by The compiler knows that x is of type T, so you can imagine it silently transforming sizeof(x) to sizeof(T) – program-o-steve Jun 30 '11 at 11:50
1  
@steve: It means the value that sizeof returns for an object is the same as the value the sizeof would return for a type of that object. – Cat Plus Plus Jun 30 '11 at 12:08

You get exactly what you write: the binary raw value of a pointer to char...

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    string x;
    getline(cin,x);
    ofstream o("tester.txt");
    o << x;
    o.close();
}

If you insist on writing a buffer directly, you can use

o.write(x.c_str(), x.size());

PS A little attention to code formatting unclouds the mind

share|improve this answer
2  
Is there any good reason for explicitly calling o.close(); at the end? – Björn Pollex Jun 30 '11 at 10:01
    
No, he wouldn't have gotten the value of a pointer (o.write is not formatted output). He would have gotten garbage though, due to printing the first sizeof(std::string) bytes of a complex object. – Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 30 '11 at 10:02
    
@Tomalak: Didn't I say binary? – sehe Jun 30 '11 at 10:05
    
@sehe: Irrelevant. He's not getting any "raw value of a pointer" in his output. – Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 30 '11 at 10:06
    
@sehe: no, write takes a pointer to the data to be written. (char*)&x is a pointer to the first byte of the storage representation of x. char is a legal type to alias and inspect any object. There's no UB here, it's just that the bytes of a string object aren't terribly interesting when printed (beyond proving that in this case a small-string optimization is in effect). – Steve Jessop Jun 30 '11 at 10:08

You're passing the object's address to write into the file, whereas the original content lies somewhere else, pointed to by one of its internal pointers.

Try this:

string x;
getline(cin,x);
ofstream o("D:/tester.txt");
o << x;
// or
// o.write( x.c_str() , x.length());
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