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I want to check what is the selected radio input.

here is my code.

<input name="u_type" type="radio" value="staff" id="u_type" checked="checked" /> Staff
<input name="u_type" type="radio" value="admin" id="u_type" /> Admin
<input id="add_user" name="add_user" type="button" onclick="addUser();"  value="Add" class="submitButton admin_add" />

function addUser()
{
//how to check what is the selected radio input
}

thanks.

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Any chance you're using jQuery or can use in your code? –  Shadow Wizard Jun 30 '11 at 10:09
    
If you have only two buttons, this will help you: stackoverflow.com/questions/1423777/… –  Felix Kling Jun 30 '11 at 10:25

6 Answers 6

up vote 13 down vote accepted
function addUser() {
    //how to check what is the selected radio input
    alert(getCheckedRadioId('u_type'));
}

function getCheckedRadioId(name) {
    var elements = document.getElementsByName(name);

    for (var i=0, len=elements.length; i<len; ++i)
        if (elements[i].checked) return elements[i].value;
}

And element's IDs must be different.

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1  
It should better be named getCheckedRadioValue since it does not return the radios HTML id as it may suggest! –  Andreas Dietrich Dec 16 '14 at 8:34

To get the value of the checked radio button, without jQuery:

var radios = document.getElementsByName("u_type");
for(var i = 0; i < radios.length; i++) {
    if(radios[i].checked) selectedValue = radios[i].value;   
}

(assuming that selectedValue is a variable declared elsewhere)

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$('input[name=u_type]:checked').val()

will get you the value of the selected option which you can, of course, assign to a variable. Due to admonishment, I should also point out that this is jquery, a handy javascript library for making DOM manipulation easier and with excellent cross-browser compatibility. It can be found here.

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OP didn't say anything about jQuery. –  Felix Kling Jun 30 '11 at 10:18
2  
True, but jquery is javascript. –  kinakuta Jun 30 '11 at 10:20
2  
@kinakuta: So? If a question is only tagged with javascript you should assume that no other library should be used. And if you use one, you should clearly state this in your answer and link to it. –  Felix Kling Jun 30 '11 at 10:21
    
I've edited my post to point this out. Jquery shouldn't be omitted as an answer in my view just because it hasn't been tagged asking for it, but point taken about clarifying the use of the library. –  kinakuta Jun 30 '11 at 10:25
2  
Or use the standard interface: document.querySelector('input[name=u_type]:checked").checked –  Glenn Maynard Mar 10 '14 at 22:12

Alternatively to kmb385's suggestion you could wrap your inputs in a form, and make sure all of the input names are different (you have two u_type) names.

Then you can access the inputs as document.formname.inputname.checked, which will return true or false.

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The following is the jQuery implementation to get the value of a radio button

$("#u_type").click(function() {
var value = $(this).val();
});

If you want to use javascript, then:

function get_radio_value()
{
for (var i=0; i < document.form.u_type.length; i++)
{
   if (document.form.u_type[i].checked)
   {
   var val = document.form.u_type[i].value;
   }
  }
}
share|improve this answer

You shouldn't have two radio elements with the same id. You need to change one of the ids then check both radio buttons like:

if(document.getElementById("u_type").checked == true)
{
   //do something
}

I would recommend using jquery to do this instead of native js.

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1  
There is no reason to load ALL of jQuery when a couple lines of code will suffice. –  JasonSage Jun 30 '11 at 10:12
    
Agreed. I get a little stovepiped because when I think js I think jquery. It depends on the circumstances. –  Kevin Bowersox Jun 30 '11 at 10:30
    
Why are you comparing a boolean against true? if(document.getElementById("u_type").checked) –  Glenn Maynard Mar 10 '14 at 22:13

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