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How to check if an Element exists, when using Page Objects with webdriver.

So far I am doing it this way.

DefaultPage defaultPage = PageFactory.initElements(this.driver,
      DefaultPage.class);
assertTrue(defaultPage.isUserCreateMenuLinkPresent());

Page Object:

public class DefaultPage {     
    @FindBy(id = "link_i_user_create")
    private WebElement userCreateMenuLink;


    public boolean isUserCreateMenuLinkPresent() {
        try {
            this.userCreateMenuLink.getTagName();
            return true;
        } catch (NoSuchElementException e) {
            return false;
        }
    }
 }

But I can not believe that this try/catch is the way one should do it. So what would be a better way to check if the elements exits (with using Page Objects)?

share|improve this question
    
If your problem is to check for the element visibility, this could help : stackoverflow.com/questions/2646195/… – phtrivier Jun 30 '11 at 11:34
    
@phtrivier: No this does not work, because the question is not about Visible, it is really about existence. – Ralph Jun 30 '11 at 11:40
    
Would getting another element injected by the annotation (one that exists like the root) and using rootELement.findElements(ByWhatever).isEmpty() be acceptable ? – phtrivier Jun 30 '11 at 11:48
    
@phtrivier: I am searching for a easy solution (for an easy problem). I want simple reduce the amount of code, and do not want to write someting like an id twice. – Ralph Jun 30 '11 at 12:20
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Webdriver is designed to throw an exception if an element is not found, So there aren't any methods to verify presence of an element in Webdriver.

Check this - http://groups.google.com/group/webdriver/browse_thread/thread/909a9b6cb568e341

share|improve this answer
2  
So what you mean is: that there is no way to check the existence of an Web Element in an PAGE OBEJECT, except try to invoke a method on an Proxy that may fail, because there is no instance behind this Proxy? – Ralph Jul 1 '11 at 11:06

The problem is the pattern itself. It uses @FindBy annotation (used by PageFactory to init the fields that must be wrapped by Proxy) that replaces the standard elements with their proxy instances which contain InvocationHandler.

Each time you try to access a field, annotated with @FindBy, the invocation handler tries to find the element using the default ElementLocator.The problem is that the ElementLocator.findElement() method throws an TimeoutException / NoSuchElementException if there are no elements presented in the DOM.

public WebElement findElement(SearchContext context) {
   List<WebElement> allElements = findElements(context);
   if (allElements == null || allElements.isEmpty())
      throw new NoSuchElementException("Cannot locate an element using "
      + toString());
   return allElements.get(0);
}

Therefore, each time you need to check whether an element is displayed or not you have to search for a List of elements and check its size.

@FindBy(css = "div.custom")
private List<WebElement> elements
...

public isElementPresented(){
   return elements != null && elements.size > 0
}

Another way to solve this problem is to create your own implementation of LocatingElementHandler and ElementLocator

So, if you need your own isDisplayed() method to return false instead of Exception, you have to replace the findElement() method in ElementLocator with something like that:

...
List<WebElement> elements = searchContext.findElements(by)
if(elements != null && elements.size() > 0){
   List<WebElement> visibleElements = []
   elements.each {
      if(it.displayed){
         visibleElements.add(it)
      }
   }
   if(visibleElements.size() > 0){
      return visibleElements.get(0)
   }
}
return null
...

And add new conditions to LocatingElementHandler.invoke()

Something like:

element = locator.findElement()
if(element == null){
   if(method.name == "isDisplayed"){
      return false
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
When you check the size of the elements list, won't it have the proxy instances and counted as non-empty? – Eugene S Nov 2 '15 at 8:01
1  
@EugeneS No, it will be WebElements, it's the meaning of proxies to redirect all element invocations to ElementLocator. And then ElementLocator interacting with concrete Context and WebElements – Андрей Шкроб Jan 19 at 20:35
    
In you isElementPresented() example I don't think the element will be null even if no actual element was found. It will still be a proxy object that won't be equal to null. – Eugene S Apr 1 at 3:22

I'm using this pattern, works fine for me:

public void login() 
{
    if (!loginButton.isDisplayed())
    {
        throw new IllegalStateException("Login button is not displayed!");
    } else
    {
        loginButton.click();    
    }        
}

or:

public boolean loginButtinIsDisplayed() {
    try {
        this.loginButton.getTagName();
        return true;
    } catch (NoSuchElementException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        return false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I recently came across this old post and believe I've found one solution.

I was testing a page that had an Add User button. When the button was clicked, various editable text fields appeared (for First Name, Last Name, Email, etc..) and a single dropdown.

When a Cancel button was clicked, the fields disappeared and no longer existed. Using WebDriverWait with ExpectedConditions.visibilityOf() would not work since the elements no longer existed in the DOM.

I found that @FindAll was a solution for me, though I must admit my test ran noticeably slow at the my List assertion.

For your code, something like this:

public class DefaultPage {     
@FindAll({@FindBy(id = "link_i_user_create")}) List<WebElement> userCreateMenuLink;


public boolean isUserCreateMenuLinkPresent() {
    if (this.userCreateMenuLink.isEmpty()) fail("Link does not exist");}

I am able to use something similar in my own tests though, and it seems like a dependable way to skirt the 'No such element' exception. It's basically a page object adaptation of asserting: driver.findElements(By.locator).size() < 1.

share|improve this answer

Using C# bindings:

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

public class DefaultPage 
{
    [FindsBy(How = How.Id, Using = "link_i_user_create")]
    private IList<IWebElement> userCreateMenuLink;

    public bool isUserCreateMenuLinkPresent()
    {
        return userCreateMenuLink.Any();
    }
}

You're telling Selenium to grab all elements that match that Id and put them into a List of IWebElement. You then call .Any() on the list which evaluates to true if at least one IWebElement was found.

share|improve this answer

Arquillian has implemented that feature in Graphene extension.

Check ElementLocatorConditionFactory.isPresent() function.

They more or less do what you wrote in your question (from ExpectedConditions.findElement in selenium-support.jar) :

try {
    return driver.findElement(by);
} catch (NoSuchElementException e) {
    throw e;
} catch (WebDriverException e) {
    // [...] some log
    throw e;
}
share|improve this answer

@Ralph: I do it the same way: try/catch. I've never found another way. You could swap out the try/catch block in a super class and design it generic. In other words: You could write a method which expects an object of type WebElement. This method contains the try/catch block and return true/false...

So I wrote the following public method in the test framework's super class and am now able to use it in every page object:

public boolean isElementExisting(WebElement we) {
    try {
        we.isDisplayed();
        return true;
    } catch(NoSuchElementException e) {
        LOGGER.severe("Element does not exist.");
        return false;
    }
}

I don't know why this is not implemented in WebDriver...

Otherwise you could use WebDriverWait.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for using common code, but sadly it doesn't answer the OP's hope for a way to do it without using try-catch. – vincebowdren Apr 14 '15 at 16:19
    
Thanks. Well, I hope the Selenium guys will implement a function for that. But in my opinion that's a reasonable solution for now. – Flo Bayer Apr 16 '15 at 8:56

try this is defiantly work in pom

public boolean isPrebuiltTestButtonVisible() {
    try {

        if (preBuiltTestButton.isEnabled()) {

            return true;

        } else {

            return false;
        }

    } catch (Exception e) {

        e.printStackTrace();
        return false;
    }
}

this will definitely work in page object model surround with try catch

share|improve this answer
    
This is about checking the "enabled" flag, but it will fail when the element does not exist - and the question is about existence - sorry. – Ralph Oct 19 '14 at 9:59
    
This uses a try-catch; the OP is asking if there is a solution which does not use try-catch. – vincebowdren Apr 14 '15 at 16:18

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