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Another one of my HTML/CSS/JS hurdles.

I have 12 photos which I need to fit in a page like this:

  • They should take up as many columns as possible (perhaps no more than 4)
  • They should stretch to fill all the available space (so if there is one column, an image's width is 100%, if there's two - 50%, if there's three - 33% and so on)
  • The layout should change to less columns if the images fall under a certain size.

This code nails some of it, but doesn't quite cut it: the images fill up all the available space only if they're in 3 columns, any less and they stick to the minimum size of 160px; and zooming the page doesn't work right, at least in Opera:

img.photoGallery {
   min-width: 160px;
   max-width: 32%;     
   float: left;
}

Tables can't do this. CSS doesn't seem to, either. I'll probably resort to JavaScript, although I'm reluctant to depend on it. So is there a trick which I don't know, and which can help me out?

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Do you really want to let the browser re-size your images? If you let the images just be their natural size (which is generally a good idea), and float them, then things should just work. You can add separation between images with a margin setting. –  Pointy Jun 30 '11 at 11:37
    
Yes, I'm OK with the browser resizing images, and, yeah, the effect I described above is what I'm looking for. –  egasimus Jun 30 '11 at 11:40

1 Answer 1

Instead of "max-width: 32%", what if you put "width: 100%"? If you want an image to fit it's container's width, you should put it's width as 100%. However, I can't visualize your layout properly, so this may not be what you are looking for.

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Well, I don't want a single image to fill up all the available space (except in case the container is narrower than 320px - above 320px, I'd want two images to fit in the available width, above 480px - three, and so on). –  egasimus Jun 30 '11 at 11:51

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