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I am trying to create an example, which would check the existence of the operator== (member or, non-member function). To check whether a class has a member operator== is easy, but how to check whether it has a non-member operator==?

This is what I have to far :

#include <iostream>

struct A
{
    int  a;

    #if 0
    bool operator==( const A& rhs ) const
    {
        return ( a==rhs.a);
    }
    #endif
};
#if 1
bool operator==( const A &l,const A &r )
{
    return ( l.a==r.a);
}
#endif


template < typename T >
struct opEqualExists
{
    struct yes{ char a[1]; };
    struct no { char a[2]; };

    template <typename C> static yes test( typeof(&C::operator==) );
    //template <typename C> static yes test( ???? );
    template <typename C> static no test(...);

    enum { value = (sizeof(test<T>(0)) == sizeof(yes)) };
};

int main()
{
    std::cout<<(int)opEqualExists<A>::value<<std::endl;
}

Is it possible to write a test function to test the existence of non-member operator==? If yes, how?

btw I have checked similar questions, but haven't found a proper solution :
Is it possible to use SFINAE/templates to check if an operator exists?

This is what I tried :

template <typename C> static yes test( const C*,bool(*)(const C&,constC&) = &operator== );

but the compilation fails if the non-member operator== is removed

share|improve this question
up vote 27 down vote accepted

C++03

Following trick works. And it can be used for all such operators:

namespace CHECK
{
  class No { bool b[2]; };
  template<typename T, typename Arg> No operator== (const T&, const Arg&);

  bool Check (...);
  No& Check (const No&);

  template <typename T, typename Arg = T>
  struct EqualExists
  {
    enum { value = (sizeof(Check(*(T*)(0) == *(Arg*)(0))) != sizeof(No)) };
  };  
}

Usage:

CHECK::EqualExists<A>::value;

The 2nd template typename Arg is useful for some special cases like A::operator==(short), where it's not similar to class itself. In such cases the usage is:

CHECK::EqualExists<A, short>::value
//                    ^^^^^ argument of `operator==`

Demo.


C++11

We need not use sizeof trick when we have decltype

namespace CHECK
{
  struct No {}; 
  template<typename T, typename Arg> No operator== (const T&, const Arg&);

  template<typename T, typename Arg = T>
  struct EqualExists
  {
    enum { value = !std::is_same<decltype(*(T*)(0) == *(Arg*)(0)), No>::value };
  };  
}

Demo

share|improve this answer
1  
As sizeof(bool) is implementation defined, there could be a platform, where this equals to 7. I would suggest using typedef bool no[2] instead. – Thomas B. Aug 22 '14 at 10:07
    
@ThomasB, There cannot be a platform with sizeof(char) = 7 practically. bool[2] is usually equivalent to char[2]. – iammilind Aug 23 '14 at 14:15
4  
sizeof(char) is always 1, no doubt. But since you want to distinguish your operator== from a normal one that returns a bool by comparing the size of the return type, you need to compare something against the sizeof(bool). But sizeof(bool) is implementation-defined and hence you don't know if seven chars are the same as 1 bool, or anything else. You only know that 2 bools occupy more space than one: sizeof(bool) != sizeof(bool[2]). But yeah, that's only nit-picking ;) – Thomas B. Aug 23 '14 at 15:48
    
What about: typedef char no[sizeof(bool)+1]; – pts Feb 16 at 0:53
1  
What if user-provided == returns X such that sizeof(X) == sizeof(no)? X could be contextually convertible to bool. See this example. – Nawaz Apr 1 at 10:26

Have a look at Boost's Concept Check Library (BCCL) http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_46_1/libs/concept_check/concept_check.htm.

It enables you to write requirements that a class must match in order for the program to compile. You're relatively free with what you can check. For example, verifying the presence of operator== of a class Foo would write as follow:

#include <boost/concept_check.hpp>


template <class T>
struct opEqualExists;

class Foo {
public:
    bool operator==(const Foo& f) {
       return true;
    }

   bool operator!=(const Foo& f) {
      return !(*this == f);
   }

   // friend bool operator==(const Foo&, const Foo&);
   // friend bool operator!=(const Foo&, const Foo&);
};

template <class T>
struct opEqualExists {
   T a;
   T b;

   // concept requirements  
   BOOST_CONCEPT_USAGE(opEqualExists) {
      a == b;
   }
};


/*
bool operator==(const Foo& a, const Foo& b) {
   return true; // or whatever
}
*/


/*
bool operator!=(const Foo& a, const Foo& b) {
   return ! (a == b); // or whatever
}
*/


int main() {
   // no need to declare foo for interface to be checked

   // declare that class Foo models the opEqualExists concept
   //   BOOST_CONCEPT_ASSERT((opEqualExists<Foo>));
   BOOST_CONCEPT_ASSERT((boost::EqualityComparable<Foo>)); // need operator!= too
}

This code compiles fine as long as one of the two implementations of operator== is available.

Following @Matthieu M. and @Luc Touraille advice, I updated the code snippet to provide an example of boost::EqualityComparable usage. Once again, please note that EqualityComparable forces you to declare operator!= too.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think one of the guidelines of Boost.Concept is to avoid creating local variables (T is not necessarily default constructible) and instead put them as member variables of the checker. – Matthieu M. Jun 30 '11 at 12:58
3  
I think the Boost Concept Checking Library already defined a set of "standard" concepts such as EqualityComparable (cf. the reference). Moreover, your concept not only requires a comparison operator, but also a default constructor. – Luc Touraille Jun 30 '11 at 13:03
1  
@Luc Touraille: I agree with the use of EqualityComparable but please note that it forces you to have operator!= defined either. – jopasserat Jun 30 '11 at 13:21
    
@Matthieu M.: Right, I edited the snippet in this way – jopasserat Jun 30 '11 at 13:21

It's also possible to use only c++11 type traits to check the existence of the member:

#include <type_traits>
#include <utility>

template<class T, class EqualTo>
struct has_operator_equal_impl
{
    template<class U, class V>
    static auto test(U*) -> decltype(std::declval<U>() == std::declval<V>());
    template<typename, typename>
    static auto test(...) -> std::false_type;

    using type = typename std::is_same<bool, decltype(test<T, EqualTo>(0))>::type;
};

template<class T, class EqualTo = T>
struct has_operator_equal : has_operator_equal_impl<T, EqualTo>::type {};

You can use the trait like so:

bool test = has_operator_equal<MyClass>::value;

The resulting type of has_operator_equal will either be std::true_type or std::false_type (because it inherits from an alias of std::is_same::type), and both define a static value member which is a boolean.


If you want to be able to test whether your class defines operator==(someOtherType), you can set the second template argument:

bool test = has_operator_equal<MyClass, long>::value;

where the template parameter MyClass is still the class that you are testing for the presence of operator==, and long is the type you want to be able to compare to, e.g. to test that MyClass has operator==(long).

if EqualTo (like it was in the first example) is left unspecified, it will default to T, result in the normal definition of operator==(MyClass).

Note of caution: This trait in the case of operator==(long) will be true for long, or any value implicitly convertible to long, e.g. double, int, etc.


You can also define checks for other operators and functions, just by replacing what's inside the decltype. To check for !=, simply replace

static auto test(U*) -> decltype(std::declval<U>() == std::declval<V>());

with

static auto test(U*) -> decltype(std::declval<U>() != std::declval<V>());
share|improve this answer
    
Where is the variable named value in the code? It will be good to have an online demo with minimal code. BTW, I have edited my answer today to be able to allow the other versions of operator==, such as MyClass::operator=(long). You may want to incorporate those changes as well. – iammilind Apr 1 at 17:36
    
@iammilind has_operator_equal inherits from std::is_same::type, meaning it's going to be one of either a std::true_type, or std::false_type, both of which define a value static boolean member. This is idiomatic for c++11 type traits. I'll update to add the right-hand-side type. – Nicolas Holthaus Apr 1 at 17:57

Just for a reference, I am posting how I solved my problem, without a need to check if the operator== exists :

#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>

struct A
{
    int  a;
    char b;

    #if 0
    bool operator==( const A& r ) const
    {
        std::cout<<"calling member function"<<std::endl;

        return ( ( a==r.a ) && ( b==r.b ) );
    }
    #endif
};
#if 1
bool operator==( const A &l,const A &r )
{
    std::cout<<"calling NON-member function"<<std::endl;
    return ( ( l.a==r.a ) &&( l.b==r.b ) );
}
#endif

namespace details
{
struct anyType
{
    template < class S >
    anyType( const S &s ) :
        p(&s),
        sz(sizeof(s))
    {
    }

    const void *p;
    int sz;
};
bool operator==( const anyType &l, const anyType &r )
{
    std::cout<<"anyType::operator=="<<std::endl;
    return ( 0 == std::memcmp( l.p, r.p, l.sz ) );
}
} // namespace details

int main()
{
    A a1;
    a1.a=3;a1.b=0x12;
    A a2;
    a2.a=3;a2.b=0x12;

    using details::operator==;

    std::cout<< std::boolalpha << "numbers are equals : " << ( a1 == a2 ) <<std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Have you checked my answer ? I think it gives exactly what you want. – iammilind Jul 1 '11 at 7:51

I know this question has long since been answered but I thought it might be worth noting for anyone who finds this question in the future that Boost just added a bunch of "has operator" traits to their type_traits library, and among them is has_equal_to, which does what OP was asking for.

share|improve this answer

IMO, this must be part of the class itself as it's deals with the private attributes of the class. The templates are interpreted at compile time. By default it generates operator==,constructor, destructor and copy constructor which do bit-wise copy (shallow copy) or bit-wise comparisons for the object of same type. The special cases (different types) must be overloaded. If you use global operator function you will have to declare the function as friend to access the private part or else you've to expose the interfaces required. Sometimes this is really ugly which may cause an unnecessary expose of a function.

share|improve this answer
    
This is true, but usually in big projects, you can not control what your colleagues are doing. – BЈовић Jul 1 '11 at 7:32
    
It's a design issue right? :) – sarat Jul 1 '11 at 11:09
    
Not really. We started comparing objects of POD types, which were created long time ago, and most do not have operator==, and for those we use memcmp, but there are problems with padding. – BЈовић Jul 1 '11 at 11:16

Lets consider a meta-function of the following form, which checks for the existence of equality operator (i.e ==) for the given type:

template<typename T>
struct equality { .... };

However, that might not be good enough for some corner cases. For example, say your class X does define operator== but it doesn't return bool, instead it returns Y. So in this case, what should equality<X>::value return? true or false? Well, that depends on the specific use case which we dont know now, and it doesn't seem to be a good idea to assume anything and force it on the users. However, in general we can assume that the return type should be bool, so lets express this in the interface itself:

template<typename T, typename R = bool>
struct equality { .... };

The default value for R is bool which indicates it is the general case. In cases, where the return type of operator== is different, say Y, then you can say this:

equality<X, Y>  //return type = Y

which checks for the given return-type as well. By default,

equality<X>   //return type = bool

Here is one implementation of this meta-function:

namespace details
{
    template <typename T, typename R, typename = R>
    struct equality : std::false_type {};

    template <typename T, typename R>
    struct equality<T,R,decltype(std::declval<T>()==std::declval<T>())> 
       : std::true_type {};
}

template<typename T, typename R = bool>
struct equality : details::equality<T, R> {};

Test:

struct A  {};
struct B  {  bool operator == (B const &); };
struct C  {  short operator == (C const &); };

int main()
{
    std::cout<< "equality<A>::value = " << equality<A>::value << std::endl;
    std::cout<< "equality<B>::value = " << equality<B>::value << std::endl;
    std::cout<< "equality<C>::value = " << equality<C>::value << std::endl;
    std::cout<< "equality<B,short>::value = " << equality<B,short>::value << std::endl;
    std::cout<< "equality<C,short>::value = " << equality<C,short>::value << std::endl;
}

Output:

equality<A>::value = 0
equality<B>::value = 1
equality<C>::value = 0
equality<B,short>::value = 0
equality<C,short>::value = 1

Online Demo

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
This is what Nicolas said, two months ago. – Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 1 at 16:22
    
Not exactly. There is a difference. My solution checks for the given return type as well.. and thus it is flexible. – Nawaz Apr 1 at 16:29
2  
Ok, now I got what you were saying. You were probably referring to the various return types. Well, in that case I agree that my solution which was based on C++03 (nearly 5 years back), will not work if the type is not bool or something more conventional. Hence, I have reedited my answer. However, mostly return type of operator== is bool or at the max an integral type. Never an odd size like bool[1313]. But sometimes I have seen usage of function argument as non class type, e.g. bool operator== (long), in such case none of the solutions will work: ideone.com/Yy3ByZ – iammilind Apr 1 at 16:34
1  
An operator== that returns anything other than bool is, frankly, not a true or useful operator==. I'd be quite happy for the trait to return false in that scenario. – Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 1 at 16:39
    
bool operator=(long) is a good one. That can also be incorporated to my solution with little modification: coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/2f9723892f9e1114 – Nawaz Apr 1 at 16:45

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