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why in C++, for objects A,B

//interface, case #1
class A {

B bb;
}

A::A()
{ //constructor
bb = B();
}


//interface, case #2
class A {

B *bb;
}

A::A()
{ //constructor
bb = new B();
}

Why case #2 work but not #1??

Edit: I got it now. But for case #1, if an instance of A is freed, will its bb also be automatically freed? Case #2 you have to explicitly call bb = NULL right?

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In which way does it not work? –  sth Mar 17 '09 at 8:52
    
Post real code, not pseudocode. –  anon Mar 17 '09 at 8:59
    
bb = NULL is not enough. C++ is not garbage collected. You need to call delete bb - otherwise you are correct: when you have bb as a member, it will be automatically free together with A and its destructor will be called automatically as well. –  Suma Mar 17 '09 at 9:25
    
A is not an object. It's a class. And about your question, I suggest reading a basic C++ book. You really need to learn from a reliable source that in C++ setting a pointer to NULL does nothing to the memory it was pointing to. –  Daniel Daranas Mar 17 '09 at 9:43
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8 Answers

up vote -1 down vote accepted

The question as for me was how to make

A::A()
{ //constructor
bb = new B();
}

but without new. And I suppose the code in the question is not a real code. Just why 'new' works but simple assignment doesn't.

And my answer is following. If I understood the question in a wrong way or the answer itself is wrong - please let me know.

Change

A::A()
{ //constructor
bb = B();
}

to

A::A():
    bb()
{
   // some logic
}

and to have a consistence in the case with 'new' it is better to implement like

A::A():
    bb( new B() )
{
    // some logic
}

In these both cases when 'some logic' will start its execution you can be sure that object bb either initialized or exception will be thrown.

To make your case compilable B should has implemented assign operator.

To your edit: Your guess about case 1 is correct. in case 2 you have to call delete bb in the class destructor.

Please leave a message of the '-1' reason. I am really confused.

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what does the bb() add to case#1? it seems pointless to me, it doesn't anything that wasn't previously there. –  hasenj Mar 17 '09 at 9:38
    
@hasen j: What is the question? :bb() is the constructor of BB call in the A initialization list. –  Mykola Golubyev Mar 17 '09 at 9:44
    
so? it doesn't add anything to case 1. bb was already defined as a value and so its default constructor will be called anyway even if you don't explicitly put it in the initialization list. –  hasenj Mar 17 '09 at 9:47
    
@hasen j: In this simple case it is. But in case of integer types or pointers or in case of not default constructor - it is the most correct way. –  Mykola Golubyev Mar 17 '09 at 10:25
    
@hasen j: It is a good practice to put objects in the initialization list event they are have default constructor. The question was about correct correspondence to the "new B()" and the answer shows it. –  Mykola Golubyev Mar 17 '09 at 10:35
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Both have syntax errors so 'does not work' isn't specific to one or the other. You also haven't declared the A::A constructor, so you will get a semantic error when you attempt to define it.

If the full declaration of B is available before the declaration of class A, then it will compile:

class B {};

//interface
class A {
    A();

    B bb;
};

A::A()
{ //constructor
    bb = B();
}

In the bb=B() line, bb has already been constructed, as it is a member of A. You are then constructing another B, then copying that B's values to bb. That's a bit of a waste. If you want to pass arguments to bb's constructor, use an initialiser.

If, on the other hand, you don't want to put the definition of B before the definition of A, and only have a forward reference to it, the compiler can't work out how big the B object it is. It needs to know how big a B is to determine how much space to allow for bb in A. So it won't be able to compile A without B.

In your second case, you instead use a pointer to a B. Pointers are the same size whatever they point at. That way the complier can work out how big A is, and only needs the full declaration of B before it actually uses one, for example by calling B's constructor in the new B() expression.

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In C++, if you declare an object, you don't need to initialize it. The constructor is called upon declaration.

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Because at compile-time, the amount of memory needed for creating a B object is not known. Therefore, it is necessary to use a pointer to the object so that the memory can be allocated dynamically (when you call new).

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The code shown is way too incomplete. Unless you show the definition of B, I am afraid nobody can answer. My wild guess would be class B is non-copyiable (e.g. private operator =). With a copyable B class the example you have given should work.

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It looks like your "B" class hides operator=. Otherwise, what you wrote should compile.

However, it isn't necessary. This should work:

A::A() : bb()
{ //constructor
}

However, since you're calling the default constructor, there's no need to explicitly state it. This could just as easily be:

A::A() // bb is automatically constructed, since it's a member variable and not a pointer.
{ 
}

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If the definition (not the declaration) of class B appears before the declaration of class A, then your case#1 should compile fine.

As Oxley pointed out, the reason for that is that C++ needs to know how much memory is needed for the B object, and it cannot do that without the definition of B.

However, if you use a pointer, (as in case#2), the amount of memory needed is known, because all pointers occupy the same amount of memory (32bit, or 64bit, depending on the system).

So, for case#2, all you need is the declaration of B before the definition of A. (note: declaration, not definition! of course, having the definition also won't hurt, but it's not necessarily needed).

Just to make sure I don't confuse anyone, (hey, maybe I don't have the C++ terminology down)

declaration: declares the existance of a class or a function, but doesn't say a thing about what it is.

e.g.

class A; //forward declaration

class C
{
   A * a;
   // .....
};

definition: actually defines the class or function. Although for a class, it doesn't necessarily define it fully, but it defines all of its members.

class A
{
   int a;
   int b;
   void some_method(); //not defined here, only declared, but it's ok
};
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I think that the case A must work, because the compiler provides a copy constructor if no one was defined.

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