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I have a string something like this

var test = 'Hello you have multiple L2:Me here;L3:Me not here; and some other text...';

I want to get string array

L2:Me here    
L3:Me not here  

The format is L(some number):text;

What will be regex?

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5  
What have you tried? If you don't know regular expressions, here is a good source to learn it: regular-expressions.info –  Felix Kling Jun 30 '11 at 12:25
    
Please go through the basics of RegEx. –  bhagyas Jun 30 '11 at 12:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If those semicolons are always going to be there, you can use something like this:

var re = /L[0-9]+:[^;]+/g;
var test = 'Hello you have multiple L2:Me here;L3:Me not here; and some other text...';
var match = test.match(re);
console.log(match);
// match = ["L2:Me here", "L3:Me not here"]

Explanation:

  • L[0-9]+: matches L followed by any sequence of numbers, followed by a colon (i.e. "L105:")
  • [^;]+ matches any character that's not a semicolon (the [^;] part) at least once (the + part), and only stops once it reaches a semicolon
  • The g flag makes the matches global, that is, to not just find the first match and stop
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I have not tested this but it should work

/(L\d:[a-zA-Z0-9\s]+;)/
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That works. You could also use \w in place of a-zA-Z0-9. –  Corv1nus Jun 30 '11 at 12:36

The regex is:

/L\d+:[^;]*/g

Meaning, begin with an L, followed by a sequence of one or more digits (\d+), a :, and a sequence of zero or more characters not including a ; ([^;]*). The g on the end is for "global", and makes the regex apply to more than one occurence.

Use with match:

var parts = test.match(/L\d+:[^;]*/g);
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