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I am new to Mathematica and am trying to understand patterns and rules. So I tried the following:

A = {1, 2, 3, 4}
A //. {x_?EvenQ -> x/2, x_?OddQ -> 3 x + 1}

This is based on: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collatz_conjecture

This is supposed to converge, but what I got is:

ReplaceRepeated::rrlim: Exiting after {1,2,3,4} scanned 65536 times. >>

Please help me understand my error in the pattern/rule.

Regards

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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The way you wrote this, it does not terminate, so it eg ends up alternating between 1 and 4, 2 etc. (all recursive descriptions must eventually bottom out somewhere, and your does not include a case to do that at n=1).

This works:

ClearAll[collatz];
collatz[1] = 1;
collatz[n_ /; EvenQ[n]] := collatz[n/2]
collatz[n_ /; OddQ[n]] := collatz[3 n + 1]

although it does not give a list of the intermediate results. A convenient way to get them is

ClearAll[collatz];
collatz[1] = 1;
collatz[n_ /; EvenQ[n]] := (Sow[n]; collatz[n/2])
collatz[n_ /; OddQ[n]] := (Sow[n]; collatz[3 n + 1])
runcoll[n_] := Last@Last@Reap[collatz[n]]

runcoll[115]
(*
-> {115, 346, 173, 520, 260, 130, 65, 196, 98, 49, 148, 74, 37, 112, 56,
28, 14, 7, 22, 11, 34, 17, 52, 26, 13, 40, 20, 10, 5, 16, 8, 4, 2, 1}
*)

or

colSeq[x_] := NestWhileList[
Which[
EvenQ[#], #/2,
True, 3*# + 1] &,
 x,
 # \[NotEqual] 1 &]

so that eg

colSeq[115]
(*
-> {115, 346, 173, 520, 260, 130, 65, 196, 98, 49, 148, 74, 37, 112, 56,
28, 14, 7, 22, 11, 34, 17, 52, 26, 13, 40, 20, 10, 5, 16, 8, 4, 2, 1}
*)

By the way the fastest approach I could come up with (I think I needed it for some project Euler problem) was something like

Clear@collatz;
collatz[1] := {1}
collatz[n_] := collatz[n] = If[
  EvenQ[n] && n > 0,
  {n}~Join~collatz[n/2],
  {n}~Join~collatz[3*n + 1]]

compare:

colSeq /@ Range[20000]; // Timing
(*
-> {6.87047, Null}
*)

while

Block[{$RecursionLimit = \[Infinity]},
  collatz /@ Range[20000];] // Timing
(*
-> {0.54443, Null}
*)

(we need to increase the recursion limit to get this to run correctly).

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It will take me a while to digest all this - thanks! –  M-V Jun 30 '11 at 14:47
    
@M-V well I think the answer @Thies provides is more in the spirit of your original attempt (and his fix is exactly along the lines of the one above, ie, provide a base case for the recursion to bottom out). But of course I think the methods I propose above are easier to understand and more flexible (I rather like the combination of Sow/Reap myself so use it often) –  acl Jun 30 '11 at 14:58
    
+1. I also discussed this here: mathprogramming-intro.org/book/node515.html, with my final solution very similar to yours. –  Leonid Shifrin Jun 30 '11 at 15:24
    
@Leonid yes NestWhileList is tailor-made for this. But I sort of like the pattern-matching thing. It's more like magic than programming (especially in more sophisticated usage). –  acl Jun 30 '11 at 15:43
    
Fully agree. Also, I think that since the pattern-matching is at the very core of mma, you can both be more direct and do more powerful things with it, than using other styles. –  Leonid Shifrin Jun 30 '11 at 15:46
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You got the recursive cases right, but you have no base case to terminate the recursion which leads to infinite recursion (or until Mathematica hits the pattern replacement limit). If you stop when you reach 1, it works as expected:

In[1]:= A = {1,2,3,4}
Out[1]= {1,2,3,4}

In[2]:= A //. {x_?EvenQ /; x>1 -> x/2, x_?OddQ /; x>1 -> 3 x+1}
Out[2]= {1,1,1,1}
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In the documentation center, the section about writing packages is illustrated with a Collatz function example.

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1  
+1. As I discussed here:mathprogramming-intro.org/book/node515.html, the solution you link to (which is probably taken from the book of Roman Maeder) is conceptually clear but not optimal in terms of performance. –  Leonid Shifrin Jun 30 '11 at 15:41
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