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I'm used to using this pattern all over my code, and I like it:

var UserWidget = (function(){
    var url = "/users",
        tmpl = "#users li", $tmpl;

    function load() {
        $tmpl = $(tmpl);
        $.getJSON(url, function(json){
            $.each(json, function(i, v) {
                appendUser(v);            
            });
        });
    }

    ...
    return {
        load: load
    };
})();

However, I have many "widget" objects. "ProfileWidget", "PlayerWidget" etc etc. and there's certain actions that each widget share. So ideally, if we're thinking object-orientally, I want each widget object to inherit some methods from a main "Widget" class.

How can I do this without changing this lovely pattern I've been using?

To be more clear I'd like to be able to do something like this:

var Widget = (function() {
    function init() {
        console.log("wow yeah");
    }
})();

// have UserWidget inherit somehow the Widget stuff
var UserWidget = (function() { ...

UserWidget.init(); // -> "wow yeah"
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2  
What's the problem with using new? TBH, that pattern is far from the best way to use JS's inheritance. –  Matt Ball Jun 30 '11 at 13:36
    
@Matt Ball: I don't want to be using new because I don't need to instantiate my objects more than once... this is just something I never found out why, but I just don't need to do new ProfileWidget() multiple times. –  Luca Matteis Jun 30 '11 at 13:39
3  
Have a look a this fantastic answer by bobince stackoverflow.com/questions/1595611/… –  wosis Jun 30 '11 at 13:41
2  
The correct way to do this is with set the prototype property and create a new instance. You don't have to "create multiple instance", just one. I can post an example, but not sure if you interested in the approach. –  GlennFerrieLive Jun 30 '11 at 13:55
    
@GlennFerrieLive: definitely I'm interested. Just want some simple syntax to let me do it without re-factoring my existing code base. –  Luca Matteis Jun 30 '11 at 13:57
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5 Answers 5

Keep in mind these solutions are not what I'd typically reccomend and they are just to satisfy the question.

What about closing over everything so that its accessible from your "sub classes" (demo)

var Widget = (function () {

    var init = function () {
        console.log("wow yeah");
    };

    var User = (function () {

        var load = function () {
            init();
        };

        return {
            'load': load
        };
    } ());

    return { 'User': User };
} ());

// Usage: This loads a user and calls init on the "base"
Widget.User.load();

Another way (demo) that you might like is to just use proper inheritance, but within the closure and then return one and only one instance of that new function. This way lets you keep User and whatever else an object

// Closing around widget is completely unneccesarry, but 
//    done here in case you want closures and in case you 
//    dont want another instance of widget
var Widget = (function () {

    // definition that we'll end up assigning to Widget
    function widget() {
           console.log("base ctor");
    }

    // sample method
    widget.prototype.init = function () {
        console.log("wow yeah");
    };

    // put widget in Widget
    return widget;
} ());

var User = (function () {

    function user() { }
    user.prototype = new Widget();

    // TODO: put your User methods into user.prototype

    return new user();
} ());

var Player = (function () {

    function player() { }
    player.prototype = new Widget();

    // TODO: put your Player methods into player.prototype

    return new player();

} ());

User.init();
Player.init();
share|improve this answer
    
That won't actually allow for UserWidget.init(). Your code does nothing to associate UserWidget with Widget or Widget.init. –  Matt Ball Jun 30 '11 at 13:58
    
Oh, I see what you want now, I've got an answer for that, sec –  Allen Rice Jun 30 '11 at 14:00
    
Ok, Updated, all your "base methods" are private and accessible from your "inherited" objects –  Allen Rice Jun 30 '11 at 14:09
    
I removed the downvote since it at least works now, but that still really ugly, and more complicated than it needs to be. –  Matt Ball Jun 30 '11 at 14:12
    
Of course its way more complicated than it needs to be, I completely agree with you that he should use one of the built in patterns for inheritance. I use that all the time, but if he insists on following this pattern then this is a solution –  Allen Rice Jun 30 '11 at 14:14
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

I decided to use Crockford's object:

// function from Douglas Crockford, comments from me
function object(o) {
    // define a new function
    function F() {}
    // set the prototype to be the object we want to inherit 
    F.prototype = o;
    // return a new instance of that function, copying the prototype and allowing us to change it without worrying about modifying the initial object
    return new F();
}

// Usage:
var Widget = (function() {
    function init() {
        console.log("wow yeah");
    }
    return {
        init: init 
    };
})();

var UserWidget = (function() {
    var self = object(Widget); // inherit Widget
    function priv() {}
    self.pub = "boom";
    ...

    return self;
})();

UserWidget.init() // -> "wow yeah"

This works great for me and I like it!

share|improve this answer
    
6 or one half dozen of another, you're using true prototypical inheritance like everyone suggested :) I like that pattern though! I'm surprised, I hadn't seen that from Crockford yet. (or I did and I forgot about it) +1 for you sir! –  Allen Rice Jul 1 '11 at 12:37
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You could use Object.create(obj), which I believe is what you're looking for.

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Without using new, you'll have to use the __proto__ property rather than prototype, so this won't work in all browsers.

var Widget = {
    init: function () {
        console.log("wow yeah");
    }
};

var UserWidget = (function(){
    var url = "/users",
        tmpl = "#users li",
        $tmpl;

    function load() {
        $tmpl = $(tmpl);
        $.getJSON(url, function(json){
            $.each(json, function(i, v) {
                appendUser(v);            
            });
        });
    }

    return {
        load: load
    };
})();

UserWidget.__proto__ = Widget;

UserWidget.init();

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/mattball/4Xfng/

share|improve this answer
1  
Seriously though, just do it one of the ways that bobince describes. –  Matt Ball Jun 30 '11 at 13:56
    
I agree with Matt :) –  Allen Rice Jun 30 '11 at 15:03
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Here's a simple example of prototyping in JS... For more detail on this topic read "JavaScript: The Good Parts"

// widget definition
var Widget = {
    init: function () {
        alert('wow yeah!');
    }
};
// user widget definition
var UserWidget = function () { };
UserWidget.prototype = Widget;
UserWidget.prototype.load = function () { alert('your code goes here'); }

// user widget instance
var uw = new UserWidget();
uw.init(); // wow yeah!
uw.load(); // your code goes here

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but I'm already familiar with this syntax, and it should be UserWidget.prototype = new Widget() (you're missing the new keyword). However, I'm looking for something that will easily adapt to the patterns I'm using. –  Luca Matteis Jun 30 '11 at 14:09
    
OK. I'm sure 'new Widget()' works too. But my code works as is. I tested it before I posted it. –  GlennFerrieLive Jun 30 '11 at 14:11
    
@Luca - no missing new, Widget isn't a function so can't be used with new (it has no [[Construct]] method or prototype property). –  RobG Jun 30 '11 at 14:15
    
right, thought Widget was a function, my bad. any case, not the syntax I'm looking for. –  Luca Matteis Jun 30 '11 at 15:36
    
You shouldn't pollute the UserWidget.prototype, since it is referring to Widget jsfiddle.net/Pg8GH –  Liangliang Zheng Jun 30 '11 at 23:52
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