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I was just wondering something. I have the following code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int number, largest, counter = 1;
    while (counter <= 10)
    {
          cout << "Enter a number: ";
          cin >> number;
          if (counter = 1)
          {
               largest = number;
          }
          else if (number > largest)
          {
               largest = number;
              }
          counter++;
    }
    cout << "\n\nThe largest number is: " << largest;
    system("pause");
    return 0;
} 

The thing is, it never terminates. I did manage to fix the problem by modifying the code a little, but I was wondering why this happened. Here is the fixed code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int number, largest, counter = 1;
    cout << "Enter a number: ";
    cin >> number;
    largest = number;
    while (counter < 10)
    {
      cout << "Enter a number: ";
      cin >> number;
      if (number > largest)
      {
           largest = number;
      }
      counter++;
    }
    cout << "\n\nThe largest number is: " << largest << endl;
    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

It seems that after removing the else if statement it worked. What happened?

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Doesn't the compiler give you a warning? –  Armen Tsirunyan Jun 30 '11 at 13:37
    
If I'd be the compiler I'd say like "Cannot implicitly convert type int to bool" or like "you shouldn't set a variable in if" or like "hey Emile wazzup why use only one = in if?Try ==." –  Bastardo Jun 30 '11 at 13:43
1  
@JohnnyCageWins. My compiler (MSVC) says something along the lines... –  Armen Tsirunyan Jun 30 '11 at 13:44
    
@Armen say hi from me ^^ –  Bastardo Jun 30 '11 at 13:49
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10 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted
if (counter = 1) 

this should be

if (counter == 1) 

otherwise, you're going to reset your counter to 1 each iteration.

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if (counter = 1) reassigns 1 to counter every loop this being always < 10.

You want if (counter == 1).

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A common mistake:

if( counter = 1) // assignment operator

This will set counter's value to 1 at each iteration, and the loop never finishes.

You should use

if( counter == 1) // equality operator
           ^^^^

which is exactly what you mean

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  if (counter = 1)

This does not compare counter and 1, it assigns 1 to counter and then checks counter- which we just set to 1 so it will always be positive and always be <= 10.

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The line

if (counter = 1)

Should be

if (counter == 1)

since you want to compare, not to assign value.

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Your first example had

if (counter = 1)

instead of

if (counter == 1)

so the if statement would reset counter to 1 during each iteration.

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Your problem is here:

if (counter = 1)

Assignment instead of comparison. Compile with higher warning level.

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if (counter = 1)

So, counter value is 1 forever.

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You're assigning 1 to counter rather than comparing it, use == instead of =

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As other notice, this is a common error. Your could avoid it by typing

if( 1 == counter )

instead of

if( counter == 1 )

since

if( 1 = counter )

would not compile (if you made the error and forgot an '=').

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IIRC the Debian hack was implemented by changing an equality to an assignment. Since then, it may look backward, but I'm a big fan of constant-lvalue comparison. –  RobH Jun 30 '11 at 13:54
    
Personal opinion, but I hate and loathe than construct. Compiling with warnings enabled will catch this particular error. Code analyzers will catch instances that the compiler won't catch such as if ((counter = 1)) ... Don't make me write things bass-ackwards. –  David Hammen Jun 30 '11 at 14:31
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