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I have created a BasePage class that inherits from System.Web.Ui.Page. In that base class I have a bool property that checks to see if a page is secure or not. Initially, I put the code in the PreInit event (of the base class), but after thinking about it, my derived pages will not be able to set the bool value before PreInit. I then thought of setting the value in PreInit of the dervcied pages and checking that value in PageInit of the base class, but what if I need to use the PreInit in the derived page?

I thought about using partial methods, but I don’t think I can do that because the page events are not partials in System.Web.Ui.Page, right?

My BasePage class is an abstract class, by the way.

This is what I have now (I have not tested this, but assumed it may work):

public abstract partial class BasePage: System.Web.UI.Page
{
   public bool IsSecure { get; set; }

   protected void Page_Init(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            if (!IsSecure) return;
            if (PageMaster == null)
                return;
            if (!PageMaster.IsUserLoggedIn)
            {
                HttpContext.Current.Response.Redirect("~/WebForms/LogIn.aspx");
            }
        }  
}


public partial class _Default : BasePage
{
   protected void Page_PreInit(object sender, EventArgs e)
   {
     IsSecure = true;
   }

}
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Your thinking is correct. I don't understand where you ran into an issue. Can you make a pseudo-code example? –  Bazzz Jun 30 '11 at 13:55
    
What do you mean when you say "if a page is secure or not"? Whether or not the user is authorized to view it? –  Anders Fjeldstad Jun 30 '11 at 13:55
    
@Anders Fjeldstad - Yes, it is for user security reasons. We have a special need for this. –  DDiVita Jun 30 '11 at 14:08
    
@Bazzz - I ran into an issue using partial methods, but I am trying to get some advcie on the best way to set my bool from a derived page and have it be checked in the base class, always. –  DDiVita Jun 30 '11 at 14:12
    
At what point in the page lifecycle (which event) will the derived page be able to set the property? –  Anders Fjeldstad Jun 30 '11 at 14:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A better solution may be to override the OnInit method in your base class. You can now still handle the init event in your pages, with the secure check carried out before the event is raised.

so:

public abstract partial class BasePage: System.Web.UI.Page
{
    public bool IsSecure { get; set; }

    protected override void OnInit(EventArgs e)
    {
        if (!IsSecure) return;
        if (PageMaster == null)
            return;
        if (!PageMaster.IsUserLoggedIn)
        {
            HttpContext.Current.Response.Redirect("~/WebForms/LogIn.aspx");
        }

        base.OnInit(e)
    }  
}

public partial class _Default : BasePage
{   
   protected void Page_PreInit(object sender, EventArgs e)
   {
      IsSecure = true;
   }

}
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yep!!! This is what I found on 4guys, too. Should be what i need. –  DDiVita Jun 30 '11 at 14:48

I suggest you make the IsSecure property abstract (and read-only) and have your derived pages implement it. The logic that determines the value of the property is contained in the getter of the property.

In BasePage:

protected abstract bool IsSecure { get; }

In _Default etc:

protected override bool IsSecure 
{
    get { // return true or false depending on some condition }
}
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Why not set your IsSecure in the Constructor, its as early as you're going to get ?

Just define it like :

public _Default()
{
 IsSecure = true;
}
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Nothing wrong with that, but I won't like to see application logic embedded in the constructor. Constructors are supposed to be quick and lightweight. It would be better to incorporate the check in the page lifecycle events. –  Simon Halsey Jun 30 '11 at 14:43
    
Only set the property, i think that is pretty lightweight.. still do the check where ever you like. –  Richard Friend Jun 30 '11 at 14:45
    
I wanted to avoid using the logic in the constructor. I thought about that, though. –  DDiVita Jun 30 '11 at 14:47

Your code is fine, if you want to be able to extend the PageInit, just override and call the base in the derived class.

public partial class _Default : BasePage
{
    protected override void Page_Init(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        base.Page_Init(sender, e);
        //more code here
    }
}
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