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I have an action that looks like this:

[Post]
[PopulateModelFromId]
public ActionResult ChangeName( string name, MyModel model )
{
    try
    {
        model.changeName
        return JSONSuccess();
    }
    catch( ModelUpdateException )
    {
        return JSONFail();
    }
}

The name and model id are sent by an ajax POST, and the model is populated by a custom action filter that takes the id and retrieves the model from the database.

The actionfilter looks like this:

...
public override void OnActionExecuted(ActionExecutedContext filterContext)
{
    // parse the id from the request
    MyModel model = getModelFromDataStoreById( id );
    filterContext.ActionParameters["model"] = model;
}
...

The problem is that the MyModel object doesn't have a parameterless constructor, and MVC is attempting to create and bind to the MyModel object before the ActionFilter is even called but throws an exception because it cannot instantiate the MyModel object.

My first question is am I doing this properly or should I be using something like HttpContext.Items to transfer data between filter and action? Second, is there a way to tell MVC to not try to bind the MyModel object because it will be created later?

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1  
So if you don't want the MyModel object bound when the method is called, then why are you putting it in the parameter list? Also, are you familiar with custom action filters? You can access an action's model and populate it either on the way in or the way out. –  mccow002 Jun 30 '11 at 14:35
    
I chose to pass the object from ActionFilter to Controller via ActionParameters. It seems like the most concise and readable solution to me. The model object is not the action's model. It is my business logic object that I perform actions on then return a JSONResult. –  Evan Jun 30 '11 at 15:03
    
So, why can't you perform the logic that's being executed in the action filter in the action itself? Action Filters are meant to be used when you have a bit of code that needs to be executed on many different actions. It helps enforce the DRY principal. However, in your case, this looks specific to this one action. So why not just call the getModelFromDataStoreById method in the action? –  mccow002 Jun 30 '11 at 17:01
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A custom model binder seems more appropriate for this task than a custom action filter:

public class MyModelBinder : DefaultModelBinder
{
    protected override object CreateModel(ControllerContext controllerContext, ModelBindingContext bindingContext, Type modelType)
    {
        var id = bindingContext.ValueProvider.GetValue("id");
        if (id != null)
        {
            return GetModelFromDataStoreById(id.AttemptedValue);
        }
        return base.CreateModel(controllerContext, bindingContext, modelType);
    }
}

which yuo would register in Application_Start:

ModelBinders.Binders.Add(typeof(MyModel), new MyModelBinder());

Now your controller action might look like this:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult ChangeName(string name, MyModel model)
{
    try
    {
        model.ChangeName();
        return JSONSuccess();
    }
    catch (ModelUpdateException)
    {
        return JSONFail();
    }
}
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