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I have a strange problem, will appreciate if anyone can help.

I have the following function:

void Foo()
{
    MessageBox.Show("here");
    throw new Exception();
}

I call it in the following two cases (separately - not at the same time):

private void Form2_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
     // Case 1
     Foo();
}

public Form2()
{
    InitializeComponent();

    // Case 2
    Foo();
}

I can see the messagebox (I receive message "here") in both case but:

[Case 1] The application doesn't break on the exception (in Debug mode) and remains silent!

[Case 2] Application correctly breaks and I can see that there is an exception in the Foo().

Any idea why?

share|improve this question
3  
Does the Load-Event fire? –  Bobby Jun 30 '11 at 15:12
    
Yes, i'll add it to the question –  Valipour Jun 30 '11 at 15:14
    
So, do you see message box on programm start up in case 1? –  Anton Semenov Jun 30 '11 at 15:15
3  
Start from enabling exceptions in Visual Studio: Debug -> Exceptions -> Common Language Runtime Exceptions and see whether it will appear in Debug mode –  sll Jun 30 '11 at 15:20
1  
If you surround the calls to foo() with a try/catch block what happens in the case that currently stays "silent"? –  dlev Jun 30 '11 at 15:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

My guess is that the call to the constructor looks a bit like this:

Form2 form = new Form2();
Application.Run(form);

The crucial part being that you are calling the constuctor of Form2 directly wheras it is the application class / message pump that is calling Form2_Load.

The final piece of the puzzle is that exceptions thrown inside a Win32 message pump are handled differently (to start with see the Application.SetUnhandledExceptionMode Method ) - what you may also find confusing is that exceptions are also handled differently based on whether the project is build in the Debug configuration or not.

You might have a handler for the Application.UnhandledException Event - this would explain the behaviour you have described.

share|improve this answer
        Application.ThreadException +=
            (o, args) =>
                {
                    // Case 1
                    MessageBox.Show(args.Exception.ToString());
                };

        try
        {
            Application.Run(new Form1());
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            // Case 2
            MessageBox.Show(ex.ToString());
        }
share|improve this answer
    
But the goal is to get the exception on the line not to catch it. –  Valipour Jun 30 '11 at 15:38
    
Your constructor is throwing exception - you can catch it either in constructor, or outside. You throwing exception on the UI thread - someone has to catch it - default "Exception happened" window or your handler. –  DiVan Jun 30 '11 at 15:53
    
Again I should say the problem is not catching the exception, the problem is (was) that visual studio weren't showing exception when it happened. –  Valipour Jun 30 '11 at 16:17

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