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Based on the django-countries documentation,

>>> person.country
Country(code='NZ')
>>> person.country.name
u'New Zealand'

should be a way to retrieve the unicode for the country name. However, when I try it i get

>>> obj.country
Country(code='AX')
>>> obj.country.name
<django.utils.functional.__proxy__ object at 0x91b81ac>

I checkout out countries.py and saw that the choices look like this:

('AX', ugettext_lazy('\xc5land Islands'))

Even using print object.country.name prints the same object. Why is it not working?

edit: Sorry, i just put the name object as a sample :p

share|improve this question
    
I don't think object is a reserved word, but can you try giving it another name just to be sure? – bcoughlan Jun 30 '11 at 15:36
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Call unicode() on it

https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.3/ref/unicode/#translated-strings

from django.utils.translation import ugettext_lazy

u = ugettext_lazy('hello')
print u
# out: <django.utils.functional.__proxy__ object at 0x158edd0>

print unicode(u)
# out: u'hello'

Normally not an issue if rendered in a template.

share|improve this answer
    
that works, thanks. – Kia Jul 1 '11 at 11:27

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