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I'm a reporter who uses the following command to create a story folder with subfolders for each new story I begin:

/bin/mkdir -p ~/Desktop/NewStory/{Copy,Data,Notes,PubMaterial,RefMaterial,Media/{Audio,Images,Video}}

It works like a charm, but I'd also like to create a text file in the "Data" subfolder called "DataJournal.txt" and I don't know how to do that.

Going one step further, I'd like to add the four headings of my data journals:

---Data Folder Setup

---Data Introduction

---Data Audit/Manipulation

---Data Queries

I can create such a text file now using an echo command but I have no idea how to work this into the command that creates the folders/subfolders. I'd be grateful for any help!

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

Just wrap the entire thing into a shell script and execute that instead of the mkdir command.

#!/bin/bash

if [[ -z "${1}" ]]; then
  die "FolderName Required"
fi


/bin/mkdir -p ~/Desktop/$1/{Copy,Data,Notes,PubMaterial,RefMaterial,Media/{Audio,Images,Video}}

echo -n "---Data Folder Setup

---Data Introduction

---Data Audit/Manipulation

---Data Queries" > ~/Desktop/$1/Data/DataJournal.txt

Adding a little generality the use of this script would be bash script-name.sh StoryName as $1 is interpolated into the first argument passed to the script. ( Or just ./script-name.sh StoryName if you happened to chmod +x it so it is executable ).

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Better still, you can make it more general and pass the value of NewStory in as a parameter. – James Jun 30 '11 at 15:42
    
Very true, I find there is a trade off between correctness and speed. I can update this to take parameters if jeff so deems it necessary. – zellio Jun 30 '11 at 15:44
    
I would love to see that. Thanks so much! – Jeff Severns Guntzel Jun 30 '11 at 15:44
    
My answer below takes the story name as a parameter - but this answer has a nicer way of handling the newlines :) – Timothy Jones Jun 30 '11 at 15:45
    
@Mimisbrunnr, You forgot to add code to check for a parameter! If executed without one, it will create ~/Desktop/{Copy,Data,Notes,PubMaterial,RefMaterial} and etc.! – Matt Jun 30 '11 at 15:59

If you really want to do it on one line, you can chain commands together with &&, but you're probably better off putting it in a shell script of its own:

#!/bin/bash

if [ $# -eq 0 ]; then echo "No name specified."; exit; fi;
/bin/mkdir -p ~/Desktop/$1/{Copy,Data,Notes,PubMaterial,RefMaterial,Media/{Audio,Images,Video}}
echo -n "---Data Folder Setup

---Data Introduction

---Data Audit/Manipulation

---Data Queries" > ~/Desktop/$1/Data/DataJournal.txt

If you put this into say create-story.sh, then you can invoke it with ./create-story.sh NewStory. Don't forget to make it executable with chmod +x create-story.sh.

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This is great. It's wonderful to be able to name the folder this way. There's just one problem, when I open the DataJournal.txt file it has this in it: ---Data Folder Setup \n\n--Data Introduction.... – Jeff Severns Guntzel Jun 30 '11 at 15:52
    
Sorry - swap out the echo line for the multi-line echo in other answers. I'll update my answer :) – Timothy Jones Jun 30 '11 at 15:53
    
Add the -e parameter to echo [enable escape chars], and it will work. – Matt Jun 30 '11 at 15:55
    
The updated version should work a treat. If you want to, you can even go a step further and open up the DataJournal file by adding something like gedit ~/Desktop/$1/Data/DataJournal.txt to the end of the script. – Timothy Jones Jun 30 '11 at 15:57
    
And if executed without any parameters? $1 would equal "", thus creating tons of folders, where they should not be.. [Right on the desktop] – Matt Jun 30 '11 at 16:01

If you're going to be doing this a lot, I would create a script. [Or you could also make this a function and put it in your .bashrc]

Copy & paste this into a file:

#!/bin/bash
if [ $# -eq 0 ]; then echo "No name specified."; exit; fi;
mkdir -p ~/Desktop/"$1"/{Copy,Data,Notes,PubMaterial,RefMaterial,Media/{Audio,Images,Video}}
echo '---Data Folder Setup

---Data Introduction

---Data Audit/Manipulation

---Data Queries' > ~/Desktop/"$1"/Data/DataJournal.txt
exit 0

Save this somewhere as "newstory", or whatever you like in your home folder [~/] Open a terminal and type [UPDATED] chmod +x newstory; sudo mv newstory /usr/games/ /usr/games/ is usually in your $PATH variable, so when you type "newstory" it knows where to look for it and executes it. Note [as of now] The other answers here do not have error protection, so if you execute the script without the parameter [$1] It will simply make all the directories in your ~/Desktop/ directory!

Now you are all done! Next time you want to add a new directory with all the sub directories and the DataJournal.txt with the header, open your terminal and type newstory "Name Of Story"! Be sure to quote it if you have spaces in the name, otherwise it will only catch the first word.

P.S. if you want to use a function in your .bashrc instead, just wrap the above code [Except the '#!/bin/bash' in a function, added to ~/.bashrc: `newstory () { paste code here ; }

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Your #! won't work unless your bash is chilling on the root of your drive. – zellio Jun 30 '11 at 15:51
    
Oops! You're right, Fixed. – Matt Jun 30 '11 at 15:54
    
Okay, when I entered the sudo command, I got this back: mv: rename newstory to /usr/games/: Permission denied – Jeff Severns Guntzel Jun 30 '11 at 15:59
    
@Jeff, sorry about that, please try the updated code. Thanks :) – Matt Jun 30 '11 at 16:03
    
Matt - you have extra " characters around the $1 which will also cause problems – Timothy Jones Jun 30 '11 at 16:10

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