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I have written some code to check two dates, a start date and an end date. If the end date is before the start date, it will give a prompt that says End date is before start date.

I also want to add a check for if the start date is before today (today as in the day of which the user uses the application) How would I do this? ( Date checker code below, also all this is written for android if that has any bearing)

     if(startYear > endYear)
            {
                fill = fill + 1;
                message = message + "End Date is Before Start Date" + "\n";
            }
        else if(startMonth > endMonth && startYear >= endYear)
                {
                    fill = fill + 1;
                    message = message + "End Date is Before Start Date" + "\n";
                }
        else if(startDay > endDay && startMonth >= endMonth && startYear >= endYear)
                    {
                        fill = fill + 1;
                        message = message + "End Date is Before Start Date" + "\n";
                    }
share|improve this question
up vote 23 down vote accepted

Does this help?

Calendar c = Calendar.getInstance();

// set the calendar to start of today
c.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY, 0);
c.set(Calendar.MINUTE, 0);
c.set(Calendar.SECOND, 0);
c.set(Calendar.MILLISECOND, 0);

// and get that as a Date
Date today = c.getTime();

// or as a timestamp in milliseconds
long todayInMillis = c.getTimeInMillis();

// user-specified date which you are testing
// let's say the components come from a form or something
int year = 2011;
int month = 5;
int dayOfMonth = 20;

// reuse the calendar to set user specified date
c.set(Calendar.YEAR, year);
c.set(Calendar.MONTH, month);
c.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, dayOfMonth);

// and get that as a Date
Date dateSpecified = c.getTime();

// test your condition
if (dateSpecified.before(today)) {
  System.err.println("Date specified [" + dateSpecified + "] is before today [" + today + "]");
} else {
  System.err.println("Date specified [" + dateSpecified + "] is NOT before today [" + today + "]");
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Shouldn't millis be also reset to zero at the beginning? – Mister Smith Oct 8 '12 at 7:51
2  
Use Joda Time's DateMidnight and you don't need to reset anything. – martin Oct 15 '12 at 10:51
    
Milliseconds alse need reset c.set(Calendar.MILLISECOND, 0); f you do not, there will be problems if you compare the dates the same day. – DragonT Feb 3 '14 at 19:41
2  
Using Calendar. HOUR is wrong, since it doesn't reset the AM/PM property, thus if the current time is 13 PM the resulting hour would be 12 PM. Use Calendar. HOUR_OF_DAY instead. – mgaido Jul 9 '15 at 10:25
    
@mark91 Fair comment and answer updated. You can always improve answers by editing yourself. – sudocode Jul 9 '15 at 12:04

Don't complicate it that much. Use this easy way,Import DateUtils java class and call method,which returns a boolean.

DateUtils.isSameDay(date1,date2);
DateUtils.isSameDay(calender1,calender2);
DateUtils.isToday(date1);

For more info refer this article DateUtils Java

share|improve this answer
2  
This is easy, do this. – Tyler Pfaff Dec 14 '15 at 19:38

Using Joda Time this can be simplified to:

DateMidnight startDate = new DateMidnight(startYear, startMonth, startDay);
if (startDate.isBeforeNow())
{
    // startDate is before now
    // do something...
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is now Deprecated! – User3 Feb 24 '15 at 8:10
    
Also be very careful in the Month Argument - Joda's is in range 1-12 and Java has range 0-11. Can throw an IllegalArgument exception if the month is January and passed from Java. Although it's not documented, it will throw org.joda.time.IllegalFieldValueException (a subclass of IllegalArgumentException) if the value is invalid. – Skynet Mar 16 '15 at 5:14
    
Good hint, but IMO Joda's range is the correct one anyway. 0-11 never made sense to me. – martin Mar 17 '15 at 7:31

to check if a date is today's date or not only check for dates not time included with that so make time 00:00:00 and use the code below

    Calendar c = Calendar.getInstance();

    // set the calendar to start of today
    c.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY, 0);
    c.set(Calendar.MINUTE, 0);
    c.set(Calendar.SECOND, 0);
    c.set(Calendar.MILLISECOND, 0);

    Date today = c.getTime();

    // or as a timestamp in milliseconds
    long todayInMillis = c.getTimeInMillis();


    int dayOfMonth = 24;
    int month = 4;
    int year =2013;

    // reuse the calendar to set user specified date
    c.set(Calendar.YEAR, year);
    c.set(Calendar.MONTH, month - 1);
    c.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, dayOfMonth);
    c.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY, 0);
    c.set(Calendar.MINUTE, 0);
    c.set(Calendar.SECOND, 0);
    c.set(Calendar.MILLISECOND, 0);
    // and get that as a Date
    Date dateSpecified = c.getTime();

    // test your condition
    if (dateSpecified.before(today)) {

        Log.v(" date is previou")
    } else if (dateSpecified.equal(today)) {

        Log.v(" date is today ")
    } 
             else if (dateSpecified.after(today)) {

        Log.v(" date is future date ")
    } 

Hope it will help....

share|improve this answer

I assume you are using integers to represent your year, month, and day? If you want to remain consistent, use the Date methods.

Calendar cal = new Calendar();
int currentYear, currentMonth, currentDay; 
currentYear = cal.get(Calendar.YEAR); 
currentMonth = cal.get(Calendar.MONTH); 
currentDay = cal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK);

     if(startYear < currentYear)
                {
                    message = message + "Start Date is Before Today" + "\n";
                }
            else if(startMonth < currentMonth && startYear <= currentYear)
                    {
                        message = message + "Start Date is Before Today" + "\n";
                    }
            else if(startDay < currentDay && startMonth <= currentMonth && startYear <= currentYear)
                        {
                            message = message + "Start Date is Before Today" + "\n";
                        }
share|improve this answer

The other answers ignore the crucial issue of time zone.

The other answers use outmoded classes.

Avoid old date-time classes

The old date-time classes bundled with the earliest versions of Java are poorly designed, confusing, and troublesome. Avoid java.util.Date/.Calendar and related classes.

java.time

LocalDate

For date-only values, without time-of-day and without time zone, use the LocalDate class.

LocalDate start = LocalDate.of( 2016 , 1 , 1 );
LocalDate stop = start.plusWeeks( 1 );

Time Zone

Be aware that while LocalDate does not store a time zone, determining a date such as “today” requires a time zone. For any given moment, the date may vary around the world by time zone. For example, a new day dawns earlier in Paris than in Montréal. A moment after midnight in Paris is still “yesterday” in Montréal.

If all you have is an offset-from-UTC, use ZoneOffset. If you have a full time zone (continent/region), then use ZoneId. If you want UTC, use the handy constant ZoneOffset.UTC.

ZoneId zoneId = ZoneId.of( "America/Montreal" );
LocalDate today = LocalDate.now( zoneId );

Comparing is easy with isEqual, isBefore, and isAfter methods.

boolean invalidInterval = stop.isBefore( start );

We can check to see if today is contained within this date range. In my logic shown here I use the Half-Open approach where the beginning is inclusive while the ending is exclusive. This approach is common in date-time work. So, for example, a week runs from a Monday going up to but not including the following Monday.

// Is today equal or after start (not before) AND today is before stop.
boolean intervalContainsToday = ( ! today.isBefore( start ) ) && today.isBefore( stop ) ) ;

Interval

If working extensively with such spans of time, consider adding the ThreeTen-Extra library to your project. This library extends the java.time framework, and is the proving ground for possible additions to java.time.

ThreeTen-Extra includes an Interval class with handy methods such as abuts, contains, encloses, overlaps, and so on.

share|improve this answer
    boolean isBeforeToday(Date d) {
        Date today = new Date();
        today.setHours(0);
        today.setMinutes(0);
        today.setSeconds(0);
        return d.before(today);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
deprecated methods... – bphilipnyc Dec 9 '15 at 3:00

another way to do this operation:

public class TimeUtils {

    /**
     * @param timestamp
     * @return
     */
    public static boolean isToday(long timestamp) {
        Calendar now = Calendar.getInstance();
        Calendar timeToCheck = Calendar.getInstance();
        timeToCheck.setTimeInMillis(timestamp);
        return (now.get(Calendar.YEAR) == timeToCheck.get(Calendar.YEAR)
                && now.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_YEAR) == timeToCheck.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_YEAR));
    }

}
share|improve this answer

Try this:

public static boolean isToday(Date date)
{
    return org.apache.commons.lang3.time.DateUtils.isSameDay(Calendar.getInstance().getTime(),date);
}
share|improve this answer

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