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Let's say I have a trip planning application, and each trip is composed of "path" resources (representing a route to be driven, for example) composed as a series of points. I can CRUD these resources using requests like so (just an example):

POST /trips/1234/paths

<Path>
  <Point>32,32</Point>
  <Point>32,34</Point>
  <Point>34,34</Point>
</Path>

DELETE /trips/1234/paths/3

Now consider that I want to be able to split a Path into two paths. In the aobve example, I might want to pick the point (32,34) to split on, which would result in two paths - one ends at that point, one starts at that point. What this means is that a single action creates two new resources, and simultaneously, deletes another (the path that was split).

So if the path in the example above was the only path in the system, and I split it with a single call, the system would now contain two new paths and the original would be gone. Example:

<Path>
  <Point>32,32</Point>
  <Point>32,34</Point>
</Path>

<Path>
  <Point>32,34</Point>
  <Point>34,34</Point>
</Path>

I'm struggling with how this would be handled RESTfully. How does one handle calls that result in multiple resources being created/modified/deleted and communicate that to the caller?

I can definitely figure it out with multiple calls (two POSTs to create the new paths and a DELETE to remove the original), but I want this to be a single call.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would try to implement it like @Darrel Miller's answer yet make it a little less RPCish. The idea is to create a PathSplit resource that guides the client each step of the way to complete the transaction. This way the client knows the result of each step and knows hows to back out if there is an error along the way.

Something like this should do the trick.

POST /pathsplit HTTP/1.1
Content-Type: application/vnd.acme.pathsplit+xml
<pathsplit xmlns="http://schema.acme.com">
  <path>
    <id>123</id>
  </path>
  <splitpoint>
      <point>32,34</point>
  </splitpoint>
</pathsplit>

=>
HTTP/1.1 201 Created
Content-Type: application/vnd.acme.pathsplit+xml
Location:
  http://acme.com/pathsplit/11

<pathsplit xmlns="http://schema.acme.com">
  <path>
    <id>123</id>
  </path>
  <splitpoint>
      <point>32,34</point>
  </splitpoint>
  <newpaths>
    <Path>
      <Point>32,32</Point>
      <Point>32,34</Point>
    </Path>
    <Path>
      <Point>32,34</Point>
      <Point>34,34</Point>
    </Path>
    <createuri>http://acme.org/trips/paths</createuri>
  </newpaths>
  <oldpath>
    <uri>http://acme.org/trips/paths/123</uri>
  </oldpath>
    <status>in-progress</status>
    <pathscreated>0</pathscreated>
</pathsplit>

With something like this the client can always GET the pathsplit resource to see what actions to take. In this example it would create both new paths following the createuri link and sending a POST request for each new path in newpaths. The server updates the status as each new resource is created.

Once the status has pathscreated of 2, the client can delete the old path by following the uri and sending the DELETE verb. Finally, it would delete the pathsplit resource, thus indicating that everything succeeded.

At every step along the way, in case of an error, or in the all too common case of a network outage, the client always knows what state the server is in and what state the transaction is in.

The pathsplit resource remains available as long as the transaction hasn't completed. The client also has the option of reverting a transaction that has not yet completed. Again, since it knows what operations have completed successfully and which haven't, it can always back out the transaction.

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Ah... This is more what I was looking for. I think I would still prefer it to be a single request though rather than having the client walk through the workflow of performing the split (though I do like your suggestion). I can see keeping the pathsplit resource around for a period of time. The client could later DELETE it to "undo" the split, or after some time, the server could delete the pathsplit resource (removing the ability to undo). Thoughts? –  SingleShot Jul 1 '11 at 18:07
    
Hanging on the the pasthsplit resource for undo will create confusion for users of your API. The DELETE verb is used to delete a resource, and the expected action is deletion of only that resource. In the case you are suggesting, you not only are deleting the resource but deleting and changing other resources. If you want to be able to undo a split, I would do a GET of the pathsplit resource and then do a POST to a new undosplit resource with the pathsplit resource as the payload. –  dacamo76 Jul 1 '11 at 22:34
    
The undosplit resource knows how to undo a split from a pathsplit resource and can create and return the new resource. Where 'undo a split' is understood to be the deletion of two resources and the creation of a new resource, equal to the original 'unsplit', but not the same instance. –  dacamo76 Jul 1 '11 at 22:41

It's not exactly pretty but this can be solved with a "processing resource"

POST /PathSplitter?SplitAt=(32,34)
Content-Type: application/vnd.acme.path+xml
<Path>
  <Point>32,32</Point>
  <Point>32,34</Point>
  <Point>34,34</Point>
</Path>

=>
200 OK
Content-Type: application/vnd.acme.pathlist+xml
<Paths> 
   <Path href="/trips/1234/paths/4"/>
   <Path href="/trips/1234/paths/5"/>
</Path>
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The short answer is that making this a single call just isn't really RESTful; unless you remodel your representations, my understanding of REST and HATEOAS is that this sort of process is trying to inject a verb into the server-side representation, which is a big no-no. That's not to say that what you want to do can't be done RESTfully, but I think it involves a bit of a refactor of your representation tree.

Then there's the question of "why" you want this to be a single call; I can see why it makes sense for it to be that from a transactional point of view. That would seem to imply exposing a transaction REST representation to the client, so the client could properly manage the transactioning. I'm not saying that that's simple, though...

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A solution with strict CRUD operations doesn't seem useful here to me. However, the operations on resources don't necessarily need to be CRUD operations. Many people even think of this as a bad way to design a REST interface (just google for rest+crud).

So, I think it's totally okay when you define a split operation as one REST call. As you apply this operation on one resource only (the original path), you can define this operation directly on it. No need to define it on multiple resources.

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