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I'm converting this code from C++ to Delphi but I don't get the following part of the code. Can anyone explain me what the following code means; what's happening to the szBuff buffer ?

I'm pretty sure it's such kind of formatting (replacement), but I don't even know what is expected as a result and I can't find any sensible documentation of the used functions (maybe I'm just a lame :)

Can anyone help me with the translation of this code to Delphi (or direct me to proper documentation) ?

I don't like this how do you convert kind of questions by myself, so I mentioned at least function names in the question title so it might searchable to someone else in the future.

function TSecInfo.BuildSecurityAttributes(var SecAttrs: TSecurityAttributes): boolean;
var
  pszSidUser: PChar;
  szBuff: array [0..1024] of Char;
begin

// pszSidUser at this time contains user SID like this
// S-1-5-21-1454471165-1004336348-1606980848-5555

// TCHAR szBuff[1024]; // I'm not sure with array [0..1024] of Char;

  _tcscpy(szBuff, _T("D:"));
  _tcscat(szBuff, _T("(A;;GA;;;"));
  _tcscat(szBuff, pszSidUser);
  _tcscat(szBuff, _T(")"));
  _tcscat(szBuff, _T("(A;;GWGR;;;AN)"));
  _tcscat(szBuff, _T("(A;;GWGR;;;WD)"));

...

  _tcscat(szBuff, _T("S:(ML;;NW;;;S-1-16-0)"));

end;

For those who are interested in what's the whole code from the link about I can tell it should be a trick how to access network pipes for writing as an anonymous user on Windows Vista above. To the whole article follow this link.

Thanks for your time
Regards

share|improve this question
    
Are you sure it is c++? Doesn't look like –  BЈовић Jun 30 '11 at 16:49
    
@VJo - no; sure not; but the source code files has *.cpp extension and library linking like this #include <windows.h> –  user532231 Jun 30 '11 at 16:52
2  
szBuff[1024] implies there are 1024 elements. array [0..1024] is 1025 elements. You need array[0..1024 - 1], sometimes written array[0..1023]. –  Andreas Rejbrand Jun 30 '11 at 17:11
1  
@daemon_x don't use array of Char. Use a string as your buffer and then PChar(...) when you call the Windows API. –  David Heffernan Jun 30 '11 at 17:19
1  
If I'm reading it correctly the sample code also uses "Shlemiel the Painter's) string concatenation (joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000319.html) –  Gerry Coll Jul 1 '11 at 2:02
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

_tcscpy and _tcscat are TCHAR macro versions of C standard library functions strcpy and strcat for copying and concatenating C strings. They evaluate to ANSI or Unicode versions depending on whether or the type of project you are targeting. It's really C code rather than C++ code in my view.

In Delphi you would simply use string variables like this:

function TSecInfo.BuildSecurityAttributes(var SecAttrs: TSecurityAttributes): boolean;
var
  pszSidUser: PChar;
  Buff: string;
begin
  // pszSidUser at this time contains user SID like this
  // S-1-5-21-1454471165-1004336348-1606980848-5555

  Buff := 'D:(A;;GA;;;'+pszSidUser+')(A;;GWGR;;;AN)(A;;GWGR;;;WD)S:(ML;;NW;;;S-1-16-0)';
  SomeOtherWindowsAPICall(PChar(Buff));    
end;

Presumably in the C code there is a call to another Windows API function that receives an LPCTSTR. The C code will pass szBuff but you can simply pass PChar(Buff) as I have shown above.

The C code is using a fixed length buffer because it doesn't have available a dynamically allocated string class like Delphi's string or std::string in C++. Fixed length buffers like this often lead to buffer overruns. In Delphi don't use a fixed length buffer if you can avoid it.

This is a classic example of why languages with built in string handling are so much easier to work with than C.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 and accept. Thanks for the explanation; Yes the ConvertStringSecurityDescriptorToSecurityDescriptor is called after this where I'll use what you suggested. –  user532231 Jun 30 '11 at 17:28
    
God bless this dynamic allocation in Delphi :) The C code still looks for me like a spilled tea. –  user532231 Jun 30 '11 at 17:37
1  
@daemon_x The C code would be a lot better if it dropped support for dual ANSI/Unicode builds, and better still if it was C++ and used std::wstring. –  David Heffernan Jun 30 '11 at 17:39
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It looks like the code is using TCHARS, basically they are a macro which makes going from unicode to non-unicode easier. _tcscpy is copying the parameter to szBuff, _tcscat is appending the parameter to szBuff. If you are familar with strcpy and strcat they do the same thing.

_tcscpy(szBuff, _T("D:")); //szBuff == "D:"
_tcscat(szBuff, _T("(A;;GA;;;")); //szBuff == "D:A;;GA;;;"
...
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks; so this means that the subsequent calling of strcat only concatenates all those strings together and it's used probably to the code be more readable ? Aren't there any special characters ? –  user532231 Jun 30 '11 at 17:08
    
Yes, that is correct. Also _T("string") will be "string" w/o UNICODE or will be L"string" with UNICODE. –  daalbert Jun 30 '11 at 17:12
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