Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

we have a mission-critical server program on top of linux, and we dont't want others to terminate it accidentally. If somebody terminates it or it crashes, we want it to restart. So we plan to write another program, say program B. We want program B and the server program to protect each other. If our server program exits, program B will restart it. If program B terminates, the server program will start it again. But we don't have a good mechanism that would let program B and the server program be notified when its peer exits. Could you guys please help us with this problem? Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

You can use init to babysit the process, and since init only terminates on reboot, you don't need a "program B".

Add to the end of /etc/inittab:

x:3:respawn:/path/to/my/program

For information on syntax and other options can be found in man inittab

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Corey Henderson. –  hittlle Jul 1 '11 at 17:28

You can restart your server from inside itself using fork. Oh the beauty of Unix.

Something like:

int result = fork();

if(result == 0)
    DoServer();

if(result < 0)
{
    perror(); exit(1);
}

for(;;)
{
    int status = 0;
    waitpid(-1, &status, 0);
    if(!WIFEXITED(status))
    {
        result = fork();
        if(result == 0)
            DoServer();
        if(result < 0)
        {
            puts("uh... crashed and cannot restart");
            exit(1);
        }
    }
    else exit(0);
}

EDIT:
It's probably wise to use the WIFEXITED macro as test condition, which is more concise and portable (changed code accordingly). Plus, it fittingly models the semantics that we probably want.

waitpid, given zero flags, won't return anything but either normal or abnormal termination. WIFEXITED results in true if the process exited normally, such as by returning from main or calling exit. If the process exited normally (e.g. because you requested that), one very probably does not want to keep restarting it until the end of days!

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, it is wonderful. Thanks –  hittlle Jul 1 '11 at 17:30

They would have to poll each other, typically. Have them send signal zero to each other (which just checks for aliveness and does not interrupt the other program).

echo $$>$1
read otherpid < $2
while :; do
 while kill -0 $otherpid
  do
   sleep 1
  done
 # restart other program
 # (really restarting myself in my peer configuration)
 $0 $2 $1 &
 newpid=0
 while [ "$newpid" -eq "$otherpid" ]
  do
   sleep 2
   read newpid < $2
  done
 otherpid=$newpid
done

You could go more fancy and try to do watchdog stuff to make sure that the program is not only existing, but actually running.

share|improve this answer
    
Great! Many thanks, Seth Roertson. –  hittlle Jul 1 '11 at 17:28
    
No problem. Make sure you accept the first answer which was the most helpful whenever you ask questions, and upvote all useful answers (once you have that ability) –  Seth Robertson Jul 1 '11 at 17:31

Would a system like http://supervisord.org/ not be vialble for you? We have supervisor monitor several process and I can attest to it's features. it is very nice if it will work for your application.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.