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I want to use a command line argument in one of my tests. I couldn't find any example of this on the web.

TEST(SomeTest)
{
    std::string file("this is some command line argument");
    CHECK(something);
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    return UnitTest::RunAllTests();
}

Any ideas?

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A well-written unit-test is self-contained, and therefore does not depend command-line parameters. You should try to restructure that. –  Björn Pollex Jun 30 '11 at 18:13
    
Command line arguments kinda defeat the purpose of unit tests... –  Grammin Jun 30 '11 at 18:13
    
I think what the OP is getting at is he wants to run the test routine that the unit test performs, on a specified file. TEST(fileLoaderStressTest) { results* results = fileLoader("want to arg-select what the data-file is"); CHECK(results.valid); } Is this somehow invalid usage of unit tests? –  Steven Lu Dec 14 '11 at 7:06
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Answer

There's no real reason to test command-line arguments directly. Instead, write your unit tests to check the behavior of your code (functions and classes) given different arguments. Once you are satisfied that your code is working properly under unit test, simply plug it into main and it should work properly there, as well.

Clarification

Imagine that you have your unit test on the argument to the std::string constructor.

TEST(SomeTest)
{
    std::string file("this is some command line argument");
    CHECK(something);
}

Then you plug it into main.

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    std::string file(argv[1]);

    // do stuff....

    return 0;
}

Because nothing should happen to the command-line argument before it is passed to the constructor, you have effectively tested it already. If, on the other hand, your main is a mess, I would suggest refactoring that first.

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I see.. thanks for the answer –  andres Jul 4 '11 at 15:26
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I think what you are looking for is the ability to specify "test input" without making a new test for each.

Say you have 3 sets of test data you want to run your test routine on. You just want to run

./unittest_build SomeTest file1
./unittest_build SomeTest file2
./unittest_build SomeTest file3

without baking the tests into the test build.

But you may as well just do it:

void runCheck(const std::string& filename) {
    std::string file(filename);
    // well, you're gonna do stuff here
    CHECK(something);
}

TEST(SomeTest)
{
    runCheck(std::string("your first testing datafile"));
    runCheck(std::string("your second testing datafile"));
    runCheck(std::string("your third testing datafile"));
    // this is what your test is. It tests these files. 
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    return UnitTest::RunAllTests();
}

Parameterizing a test means the test is no longer just a test. It's now a function rather than a unit test.

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