Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to use .NET's Regex.IsMatch function to determine if a string is 8 characters long and matches the expression AK-\d\d\d\d[fF]. So, AK-9442F would match but not AK-9442F2 nor AK-9442. How would I construct the expression?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Using the static Regex.IsMatch, you can do:

if (Regex.IsMatch(myTestString, @"^AK-\d{4}[fF]$")) {
  // passed
}

Should work for your purpose. Broken down, it's:

^       # must match beginning of the string
  AK-     # string literal, "AK-"
  \d{4}   # \d is digit, {4} means must be repeated 4 times
  [fF]    # either upper or lowercase F
$       # must match end of string

GSkinner Test

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the concise, yet detailed answer. –  blueshift Jun 30 '11 at 18:33
    
@blueshift: You're very welcome. –  Brad Christie Jun 30 '11 at 18:34

Use this pattern: ^AK-\d{4}[Ff]$

The ^ matches the beginning of the string, and $ matches the end of the string. This ensures that the entire string must match and avoids any partial matches. The \d{4} matches exactly 4 digits.

string pattern = @"^AK-\d{4}[Ff]$";
bool result = Regex.IsMatch("AK-1234F", pattern);
Console.WriteLine(result);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the answer. Yours was as good as Brad's below. –  blueshift Jun 30 '11 at 18:36
 Regex.IsMatch(myString, @"^AK-\d{4}[fF]$")
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for taking time to answer! –  blueshift Jun 30 '11 at 18:36

You alread have it.

Something like this should work:

^AK-[0-9]{4}[Ff]$

share|improve this answer
    
Needs the end of string anchor as well otherwise AK-9442F2 will match. –  Dunes Jun 30 '11 at 18:14
    
Thanks for your help. –  blueshift Jun 30 '11 at 18:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.