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I know this sounds like a strange question, but bear with me.

I have a custom class that has some large objects which need to be returned by reference to avoid a copy.

My class looks something like this:

    class csv_File {
    public:
      csv_File(std::string); //constructor
      std::string const& access(int,int) const;
      void modify_element(int column,int row ,std::string value) {
        storage.at(row).at(column)=value;
    }

    private:
      mutable std::vector < std::vector<std::string> > storage;

    };

The code for access is:

    string const& csv_File::access(int column,int row) const {
    return storage.at(row).at(column);
    }

When I try to compile this, I get an error, as it wants

csv_File::modify_element(int column,int row ,std::string value) const {}

In practice, storage is logically const, but I just need to be able to modify it once in a while. Is there a way to do this?

Also, a related question. If I call modify_element to modify an element in storage, but previously, I have returned a reference to that element using access, will the reference that was returned previously pick up the new value after the modify_element call?

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3  
What exactly needs the modify_element call? I don't see anything calling it. –  bdonlan Jun 30 '11 at 19:22
2  
What's the exact error message you get? –  Adam Rosenfield Jun 30 '11 at 19:24
1  
And, what's the definition of data_store? Please cut-and-paste the precise program that demonstrates the problem, not something that is almost like it. For a description of how to produce minimal complete samples, and why it is important, please see sscce.org. –  Robᵩ Jun 30 '11 at 19:28
    
It seems like somewhere you call modify_element on a const csv_File. –  user763305 Jun 30 '11 at 19:30
    
When I tried to compile your program, I got several errors as well, none of them related to your question. After fixing the errors, I got this program: ideone.com/GYyNs, which compiles with no errors. Could you restate your question? –  Robᵩ Jun 30 '11 at 19:33
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

After fixing up your program, and with the hint from @user763305, I suppose you have something like this (note: this program compiles, but invokes undefined behavior when run, since the storage vector is left empty):

#include <string>
#include <vector>

class csv_File {
public:
  csv_File(std::string) {}
  std::string const& access(int,int) const;
  void modify_element(int column,int row ,std::string value) {
    storage.at(row).at(column)=value;
  }

private:
  mutable std::vector < std::vector<std::string> > storage;

};

std::string const& csv_File::access(int column,int row) const {
  return storage.at(row).at(column);
}

const csv_File& Factory() { static csv_File foo("foo.txt"); return foo; }
int main(){
    const csv_File& f(Factory());
    f.modify_element(1, 2, "hello");
}

and you get an error like this:

cs.cc: In function ‘int main()’:
cs.cc:24: error: passing ‘const csv_File’ as ‘this’ argument of ‘void csv_File::modify_element(int, int, std::string)’ discards qualifiers

So, you have a const object and are trying to invoke modify_element on it. Logically, this is a mistake -- you can't modify const objects!

You have, as I see it, two choices for a fix. Either you can declare the vector object mutable and the modify_element method const, or you can modify your object factory to return non-const references.

Solution 1:

...
  void modify_element(int column,int row ,std::string value) const {
    storage.at(row).at(column)=value;
  }
...

Solution 2:

...
const csv_File& Factory() { static csv_File foo("foo.txt"); return foo; }
csv_File& RW_Factory() { static csv_File foo("foo.txt"); return foo; }
...
  const csv_File& f(RW_Factory());
...


EDIT And, yes, if you previously returned a reference to a string in your vector, and you subsequently assign a new value to that string as you do in modify_element, then the previous reference will reflect the new value.

Note that the previous reference will be invalid if you destroy the vector, erase that vector element, or do anything to cause the vector to grow beyond its previous capacity.

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Aside: modify_element really should takes its third parameter by reference, not by value: const std::string& value. –  Robᵩ Jun 30 '11 at 19:51
    
Thanks, for taking the time to figure out my incomplete code. The first solution provided essentially does what I am looking for. Can you give some more information why the reference becomes invalid of the vector grows? –  user788171 Jun 30 '11 at 20:37
    
When a vector grows, if it grows beyond the capacity of its memory region, it must be copied into a new, larger memory region; the old now-too-small region is destroyed. Thus, any pointer (or reference or iterator) pointing into the old, now discarded memory is invalid. From the C++03 standard, §23.2.4.3, ¶1: "[vector::insert] causes reallocation if the new size is greater than the old capacity", and §23.2.4.2, ¶5: "Reallocation invalidates all the references, pointers, and iterators referring to the elements in the sequence." –  Robᵩ Jul 1 '11 at 21:20
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