Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I add an instance method to a class using a metaclass (yes I do need to use a metaclass)? The following kind of works, but the func_name will still be "foo":

def bar(self):
    print "bar"

class MetaFoo(type):
    __new__(cls, name, bases, dict):
        dict["foobar"] = bar
        return type(name, bases, dict)

class Foo(object):
    __metaclass__ = MetaFoo

>>> f = Foo()
>>> f.foobar()
bar
>>> f.foobar.func_name
'bar'

My problem is that some library code actually uses the func_name and later fails to find the 'bar' method of the Foo instance. I could do:

dict["foobar"] = types.FunctionType(bar.func_code, {}, "foobar")

There is also types.MethodType, but I need an instance that does'nt exist yet to use that. Am I missing someting here?

share|improve this question
    
Why are you trying to change the name of the method? doesn't dict[bar.func_name] = bar accomplish what you want? –  Aaron Maenpaa Sep 15 '08 at 19:03
    
Good question... I was originally creating method names based on attributes defined in the dict, but I realize this is pointless if the implementations of the methods are identical. –  Knut Eldhuset Sep 15 '08 at 19:30
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Try dynamically extending the bases that way you can take advantage of the mro and the methods are actual methods:

class Parent(object):
    def bar(self):
        print "bar"

class MetaFoo(type):
    def __new__(cls, name, bases, dict):
    	return type(name, (Parent,) + bases, dict)

class Foo(object):
    __metaclass__ = MetaFoo

if __name__ == "__main__":
    f = Foo()
    f.bar()
    print f.bar.func_name
share|improve this answer
    
What if I want to create several methods that reference the 'bar' implementation? –  Knut Eldhuset Sep 15 '08 at 19:21
add comment

I think what you want to do is this:

>>> class Foo():
...   def __init__(self, x):
...     self.x = x
... 
>>> def bar(self):
...   print 'bar:', self.x
... 
>>> bar.func_name = 'foobar'
>>> Foo.foobar = bar
>>> f = Foo(12)
>>> f.foobar()
bar: 12
>>> f.foobar.func_name
'foobar'

Now you are free to pass Foos to a library that expects Foo instances to have a method named foobar.

Unfortunately, (1) I don't know how to use metaclasses and (2) I'm not sure I read your question correctly, but I hope this helps.

Note that func_name is only assignable in Python 2.4 and higher.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.