Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I've read this (http://stackoverflow.com/quest...), so I know what bitwise operators are but I'm still not clear on how one might use them... Can anyone offer any real-world examples of where a bitwise operator would be useful in JavaScript?

Thanks.

Edit:

Just digging into the jQuery source I've found a couple of places where bitwise operators are used, for example: (only the & operator)

// Line 2756:
event.which = (event.button & 1 ? 1 : ( event.button & 2 ? 3 : ( event.button & 4 ? 2 : 0 ) ));

// Line 2101
var ret = a.compareDocumentPosition(b) & 4 ? -1 : a === b ? 0 : 1;
share|improve this question

15 Answers 15

up vote 30 down vote accepted

Example:

Parses hexadecimal value to get RGB color values.

var hex = 'ffaadd';
var rgb = parseInt(hex, 16); // value is 1675421


var red   = (rgb >> 16) & 0xFF; // returns 255
var green = (rgb >> 8) & 0xFF;  // 170
var blue  = rgb & 0xFF;     // 221  
share|improve this answer
4  
code taken from phpied.com/bitwise-operations-in-javascript – Livingston Samuel Feb 22 '11 at 9:48
    
How does this comply with UTF-16? – Ted Barth Nov 28 '14 at 9:36

In JavaScript, you can use a double bitwise negation (~~n) as a replacement for Math.floor(n) (if n is a positive number) or parseInt(n, 10) (even if n is negative). n|n and n&n always yield the same results as ~~n.

var n = Math.PI;
n; // 3.141592653589793
Math.floor(n); // 3
parseInt(n, 10); // 3
~~n; // 3
n|n; // 3
n&n; // 3

// ~~n works as a replacement for parseInt() with negative numbers…
~~(-n); // -3
(-n)|(-n); // -3
(-n)&(-n); // -3
parseInt(-n, 10); // -3
// …although it doesn’t replace Math.floor() for negative numbers
Math.floor(-n); // -4

A single bitwise negation (~) calculates -(parseInt(n, 10) + 1), so two bitwise negations will return -(-(parseInt(n, 10) + 1) + 1).

It should be noted that of these three alternatives, n|n appears to be the fastest.

Update: More accurate benchmarks here: http://jsperf.com/rounding-numbers-down

(As posted on Strangest language feature)

share|improve this answer
1  
n << 0; is now fastest on V8. n | 0; is very close behind and is what I use. – Bardi Harborow Mar 29 '15 at 8:32

I heavily use bitwise operators for numerical convertions in production scripts, because sometimes they're much faster than their Math or parseInt equivalents.

The price I have to pay is code readability. So I usualy use Math in development and bitwise in production.

You can find some performance tricks on jsperf.com.

As you can see, browsers don't optimize Math.ceil and parseInt for years, so I predict bitwise will be faster and shorter way to do things in furure as well.

Some further reading on SO...


Bonus: cheat sheet for | 0 : an easy and fast way to convert anything to integer:

( 3|0 ) === 3;             // it does not change integers
( 3.3|0 ) === 3;           // it casts off the fractional part in fractionalal numbers
( 3.8|0 ) === 3;           // it does not round, but exactly casts off the fractional part
( -3.3|0 ) === -3;         // including negative fractional numbers
( -3.8|0 ) === -3;         // which have Math.floor(-3.3) == Math.floor(-3.8) == -4
( "3"|0 ) === 3;           // strings with numbers are typecast to integers
( "3.8"|0 ) === 3;         // during this the fractional part is cast off too
( "-3.8"|0 ) === -3;       // including negative fractional numbers
( NaN|0 ) === 0;           // NaN is typecast to 0
( Infinity|0 ) === 0;      // the typecast to 0 occurs with the Infinity
( -Infinity|0 ) === 0;     // and with -Infinity
( null|0 ) === 0;          // and with null,
( (void 0)|0 ) === 0;      // and with undefined
( []|0 ) === 0;            // and with an empty array
( [3]|0 ) === 3;           // but an array with one number is typecast to number
( [-3.8]|0 ) === -3;       // including the cast off of the fractional part
( [" -3.8 "]|0 ) === -3;   // including the typecast of strings to numbers
( [-3.8, 22]|0 ) === 0     // but an Array with several numbers is typecast to 0
( {}|0 ) === 0;                // an empty object is typecast to 0
( {'2':'3'}|0 ) === 0;         // or a not empty object
( (function(){})|0 ) === 0;    // an empty function is typecast to 0 too
( (function(){ return 3;})|0 ) === 0;

and some magic for me:

3 | '0px' === 3;
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for mentioning readability! – the0ther Mar 14 '14 at 15:50
    
or use closure compiler in advanced mode which does all these optimisations for you – Pawel May 14 at 15:59
    
this is not a good answer. At first it looks like a reference and having much information (I even upvoted it yesterday), but after a more thorough look into it this turns out not to be true. – user907860 Jul 16 at 8:42
    
All this 20 lines or so of examples could have been expressed in a single sentence: The bitwise operators work with 32-bit, two's complement big-endian (32-bit, for short) representations of numbers, so any of their operands is converted to this format according to the following rules: a number is converted from the IEEE-754 64-bit format to 32-bit and anything else is first converted to a number as specified in the ECMAScript spec (namely, for objects (that is objects, arrays, functions) via a call to its valueOf method) and then this number is converted to the 32-bit format – user907860 Jul 16 at 8:48
    
You can try this: 'use strict'; Function.prototype.valueOf = function() {return 2;};console.log(( (function(){})|0 ) === 0);, and you'll see that your last two examples are not correct and so on. – user907860 Jul 16 at 8:53

You can use them for flipping a boolean value:

var foo = 1;
var bar = 0;
alert(foo ^= 1);
alert(bar ^= 1);

This is a bit silly though and for the most part bitwise operators do not have many applications in Javascript.

share|improve this answer
4  
That's not silly. I use that to cycle through "on"/"off" states for images, divs, etc all the time. – Crescent Fresh Mar 17 '09 at 16:46

Given the advances Javascript is making (especially with nodejs that allows server side programming with js), there is more and more complex code in JS. Here are a couple of instances where I have used bitwise operators:

  • IP address operations:

    //computes the broadcast address based on the mask and a host address
    broadcast = (ip & mask) | (mask ^ 0xFFFFFFFF)
    
    
    //converts a number to an ip adress 
    sprintf(ip, "%i.%i.%i.%i", ((ip_int >> 24) & 0x000000FF),
                             ((ip_int >> 16) & 0x000000FF),
                             ((ip_int >>  8) & 0x000000FF),
                             ( ip_int        & 0x000000FF));
    

Note: this is C code, but JS is almost identical

  • CRC algorithms uses them a lot

Check out the wikipedia entry on this

  • Screen resolution operations
share|improve this answer
    
Do you have examples of you used bitwise operators in these situations? – thomasrutter Mar 17 '09 at 12:53
    
I do, but I don't work in Open Source so I cannot point you to the code. – Bogdan Gavril - MSFT Apr 9 '13 at 11:00

A real life example? :

^ (Bitwise XOR) as a I/O toggler

jsBin example

Used like value ^= 1 will change on every call the value to 0, 1, 0, 1 ...
If we pass that value as a Statement into a Conditional operator (?:) like

statement ? (if true) : (if false)

and checking for the boolean representation of 0=false, 1=true we can toggle text, classes, styles.... whatever is needed like i.e: a button text:

value ? "Close dropdown" : "Open dropdown";

For a single element, a Toggle function could look like:

// USING GLOBAL VARIABLE
var tog = 0;
var btn = document.getElementById('myButton');
function toggler(){   
  tog ^= 1;
  this.innerHTML = tog ? "hide" : "show";
}
btn.addEventListener('click', toggler, false);

For multiple elements we can store the tog variable state directly into the this - ElementHTML Object like:

// WITHOUT GLOBAL VARIABLE
var btns = document.getElementsByClassName('myButton');
function toggler(){   
  var tog = this.tog ^= 1; // get/set tog value out of this.tog object
  this.innerHTML = tog ? "hide" : "show";
}
for(var i=0; i<btns .length; i++){
   btns[i].addEventListener('click', toggler, false);
}

Or, if you don't like the this idea, go for the standard dataset attribute property ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Or you could just use a boolean... – Bardi Harborow Mar 29 '15 at 8:44

Few other examples of how to use bitwise not and double bitwise not:

Floor operation

~~2.5     //2
~~2.1     //2
~~(-2.5) //-2

Check whether indexOf returned -1 or not

var foo = 'abc';
!~foo.indexOf('bar'); //true

You may find more examples and explanation in this article about bitwise operations in javascript.

share|improve this answer

Bitmasks.

Used extensively, for example, in JS events.

share|improve this answer
2  
May we please have an example? – Alex Grande Aug 13 '12 at 21:13

to tell if a number is odd:

function isOdd(number) {
    return !!(number & 1);
}

isOdd(1); // true, 1 is odd
isOdd(2); // false, 2 is not odd
isOdd(357); // true, 357 is odd

faster than modulus - use where performance really counts!

share|improve this answer

I've used it once for a permissions widget. File permissions in unix are a bitmask, so to parse it, you need to use bit operations.

share|improve this answer
var arr = ['abc', 'xyz']

Annoyed to write

if (arr.indexOf('abc') > -1) {
  // 'abc' is in arr
}

if (arr.indexOf('def') === -1) {
  // 'def' is not in arr
}

to check if something is inside an array?

You can use the bitwise operator ~ like so:

if (~arr.indexOf('abc')) {
  // 'abc' is in arr
}

if (!~arr.indexOf('def')) {
  // 'def' is not in arr
}
share|improve this answer

They seem to be very useful when you work with hex values and bits. Since 4 bits can represent 0 to F.

1111 = F 1111 1111 = FF.

share|improve this answer

I'm using them to flatten three numbers into 1 as a way of storing multidimensional arrays in a Uint16Array. Here is a snippet of a voxel game I'm developing:

function Chunk() {
  this._blocks = new Uint16Array(32768);
  this._networkUpdates = [];
}

Chunk.prototype.getBlock = function(x, y, z) {
  return this._blocks[y + (x << 5) + (z << 10)];
};

Chunk.prototype.setBlock = function(x, y, z, value) {
  this._blocks[y + (x << 5) + (z << 10)] = value;
  this._networkUpdates.push(value + (y << 15) + (x << 20) + (z << 25));
};

Chunk.prototype.getUpdates = function() {
  return this._networkUpdates;
};

Chunk.prototype.processUpdate = function(update) {
  // this._blocks[Math.floor(update / 65536)] = update % 65536;
  this._blocks[update >> 16] = update & 65535;
};

var chunk = new Chunk();
chunk.setBlock(10, 5, 4);
alert(chunk.getBlock(10, 5, 4));
alert(chunk.getUpdates()[0]);

share|improve this answer

Example using Node.js

Presuming you had a file (called multiply.js) with these contents, you could run

`node multiply <number> <number>`

and get an output consistent with using the multiplication operator on the same two numbers. The bit shifting going on in the Mulitply function is an example of how to take the bit mask representing one number and use it to flip bits in another number for fast operations.

var a, b, input = process.argv.slice(2);

var printUsage = function() {
  console.log('USAGE:');
  console.log('  node multiply <number> <number>');
}

if(input[0] === '--help') {+
  printUsage();
  process.exit(0);
}

if(input.length !== 2) {
  printUsage();
  process.exit(9);
}

if(isNaN(+input[0]) || isNaN(+input[1])) {
  printUsage();
  process.exit(9);
}

// Okay, safe to proceed

a = parseInt(input[0]),
b = parseInt(input[1]);

var Multiply = function(a,b) {
  var x = a, y = b, z = 0;

  while( x > 0 ) {
    if(x % 2 === 1) {
      z = z + y;
    }
    y = y << 1;
    x = x >> 1;
  }

  return z;
}

var result = Multiply(a,b);

console.log(result);
share|improve this answer

I just found this question trying to confirm if the bitwise AND operator also was & in Javascript.

Since you asked for an example:

if ($('input[id="user[privileges]"]').length > 0) {
    $('#privileges button').each(function () {
        if (parseInt($('input[id="user[privileges]"]').val()) & parseInt($(this).attr('value'))) {
            $(this).button('toggle');
        }
    });
}

It populates the state of buttons with jQuery given a bitmask value of a hidden field:

  • none = 0
  • user = 1
  • administrator = 2
  • user + administrator = 3
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.