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Am researching the best way to load external properties files from and EJB 3 app whose EAR file is deployed to WebLogic.

Was thinking about using an init servlet but I read somewhere that it would be too slow (e.g. my message handler might receive a message from my JMS queue before the init servlet runs).

Suppose I have multiple property files or one file here:

~/opt/conf/

So far, I feel that the best possible solution is by using a Web Logic application lifecycle event where the code to read the properties files during pre-start:

import weblogic.application.ApplicationLifecycleListener;
import weblogic.application.ApplicationLifecycleEvent;

public class MyListener extends ApplicationLifecycleListener {
   public void preStart(ApplicationLifecycleEvent evt) {
      // Load properties files
   } 
}

See: http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/E13222_01/wls/docs90/programming/lifecycle.html

What would happen if the server is already running, would post start be a viable solution?

Can anyone think of any alternative ways that are better?

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2 Answers 2

It really depends on how often you want the properties to be reloaded. One approach I have taken is to have a properties file wrapper (singleton) that has a configurable parameter that defines how often the files should be reloaded. I would then always read properties through that wrapper and it would reload the properties ever 15 minutes (similar to Log4J's ConfigureAndWatch). That way, if I wanted to, I can change properties without changing the state of a deployed application.

This also allows you to load properties from a database, instead of a file. That way you can have a level of confidence that properties are consistent across the nodes in a cluster and it reduces complexity associated with managing a config file for each node.

I prefer that over tying it to a lifecycle event. If you weren't ever going to change them, then make them static constants somewhere :)

Here is an example implementation to give you an idea:

import java.io.FileInputStream;
import java.io.FileNotFoundException;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.*;

/**
 * User: jeffrey.a.west
 * Date: Jul 1, 2011
 * Time: 8:43:55 AM
 */
public class ReloadingProperties
{
  private final String lockObject = "LockMe";
  private long lastLoadTime = 0;
  private long reloadInterval;
  private String filePath;
  private Properties properties;

  private static final Map<String, ReloadingProperties> instanceMap;
  private static final long DEFAULT_RELOAD_INTERVAL = 1000 * 60 * 5;

  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    ReloadingProperties props = ReloadingProperties.getInstance("myProperties.properties");
    System.out.println(props.getProperty("example"));

    try
    {
      Thread.sleep(6000);
    }
    catch (InterruptedException e)
    {
      e.printStackTrace();
    }

    System.out.println(props.getProperty("example"));
  }

  static
  {
    instanceMap = new HashMap(31);
  }

  public static ReloadingProperties getInstance(String filePath)
  {
    ReloadingProperties instance = instanceMap.get(filePath);

    if (instance == null)
    {
      instance = new ReloadingProperties(filePath, DEFAULT_RELOAD_INTERVAL);

      synchronized (instanceMap)
      {
        instanceMap.put(filePath, instance);
      }
    }

    return instance;
  }

  private ReloadingProperties(String filePath, long reloadInterval)
  {
    this.reloadInterval = reloadInterval;
    this.filePath = filePath;
  }

  private void checkRefresh()
  {
    long currentTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    long sinceLastLoad = currentTime - lastLoadTime;

    if (properties == null || sinceLastLoad > reloadInterval)
    {
      System.out.println("Reloading!");
      lastLoadTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
      Properties newProperties = new Properties();
      FileInputStream fileIn = null;

      synchronized (lockObject)
      {
        try
        {
          fileIn = new FileInputStream(filePath);
          newProperties.load(fileIn);
        }
        catch (FileNotFoundException e)
        {
          e.printStackTrace();
        }
        catch (IOException e)
        {
          e.printStackTrace();
        }
        finally
        {
          if (fileIn != null)
          {
            try
            {
              fileIn.close();
            }
            catch (IOException e)
            {
              e.printStackTrace();
            }
          }
        }

        properties = newProperties;
      }
    }
  }

  public String getProperty(String key, String defaultValue)
  {
    checkRefresh();
    return properties.getProperty(key, defaultValue);
  }


  public String getProperty(String key)
  {
    checkRefresh();
    return properties.getProperty(key);
  }
}
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Thanks Jeff... Can you show me some implementation? Loading properties from a database is outside the scope of this task. –  socal_javaguy Jun 30 '11 at 23:24
    
added code example. –  Jeff West Jul 1 '11 at 16:04
    
Thanks for the code sample! I don't know if my lead would want to do it out of the box like this... Will suggest it to him. There's no default directory or just simple configuration area that WebLogic loads properties files which are accessible to any application that runs in WebLogic? –  socal_javaguy Jul 1 '11 at 16:35
    
When I added some implementation inside these methods, the lifecycle methods couldn't find my class! See: bit.ly/jZ7fda –  socal_javaguy Jul 1 '11 at 17:52
    
I'm not sure what you mean. If you include this in the JAR/WAR/EAR that you are deploying then it should be able to find them. See the example usage in the main method in the example above. –  Jeff West Jul 1 '11 at 22:05
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Figured it out...

See the corresponding / related post on Stack Overflow.

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