Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I looking for the best way to check for inter-table constraints an step forward of foreing keys. For instance, to check if a date child record value is between a range date on two parent rows columns. For instance:

Parent table  
ID    DATE_MIN   DATE_MAX
----- ---------- ----------
1     01/01/2009 01/03/2009
...

Child table
PARENT_ID  DATE
---------- ----------
1          01/02/2009
1          01/12/2009   <--- HAVE TO FAIL!
...

I see two approaches:

  • Create materialized views on-commit as shown in this article (or other equivalent on other RDBMS).
  • Use stored-procedures and triggers.

Any other approach? Which is the best option?

UPDATE: The motivation of this question is not about "putting the constraints on database or on application". I think this is a tired question and anyone does the way she loves. And, I'm sorry for detractors, I'm developing with constraints on database. From here, the question is "which is the best option to manage inter-table constraints on database?". I'm added "inside database" on the question title.

UPDATE 2: Some one added the "oracle" tag. Of course materialized views are oracle-tools but I'm interested on any option regardless it's on oracle or others RDBMSs.

share|improve this question
    
Might be useful to post some stripped down DDL and show what INSERTs/UPDATEs you'd consider legal/illegal - it's always easier if we can play around on our own DBMS and post tested solutions :-) – Damien_The_Unbeliever Mar 17 '09 at 15:33
    
I know you're asking a more general question, but I'm not clear on your example at the end of the first paragraph... – Damien_The_Unbeliever Mar 17 '09 at 15:34
    
I hope the update helps. – FerranB Mar 17 '09 at 15:57
    
Yup, I at first thought you were saying there were two rows in the parent table, with one date on each row. Posted my take on the specific example. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Mar 17 '09 at 17:27

EDIT: Dana the Sane deleted his post which was to put it in the data layer regardless of DBA objections.


The reasons DBAs scream at Developers like Dana is they assume that there's a 1:1 ratio between applications and databases. They see this because they see the data as there to support the app and their app only needs to store data in one place.

DBA's see the data as the most important thing, and don't care if the app comes or goes.

If you lost the use of MS Word, would you care if you could still get to your documents? No, the data is important to you, the app isn't.

If you ever let anything bypass your app, to get to your data, you've lost your constraints in your data layer. If your constraints are in your database layer, a dozens apps would all be able you use it.

Ideally, you'd never grant INSERT, UPDATE or DELETE to anyone. Instead you'd grant EXECUTE On packages that will do the CRUD for you. If you do this from the beginning, the ability to add rules to the INSERT of a CHILD (like checking if birth is between parent dates) is virtually infinite.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm updated the question to clarify the target. – FerranB Mar 17 '09 at 15:32
    
Yes and I said, within the DB use CRUD packages, not triggers or mviews or something else. Crud solves most of it. – Mark Brady Mar 17 '09 at 15:54
    
CRUD works well. For single tables. But when you're dealing with rules that apply across multiple tables (as in this question), you end up repeating a lot of logic if you don't enforce at lower levels. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Mar 17 '09 at 18:07
    
No, CRUD works well for anything. You can have INS/UPD/DEL for some complex object that's stored in 5 tables. There's no requirement that it be 1pkg:1tab. In this case, the add_child CRUD would accept the parent ID's so the dates could be checked against the parents. What's lower than the database? – Mark Brady Mar 18 '09 at 18:18
    
I think you're limiting CRUD possibilities based on some prejudice. (the actual meaning of that word, not the pejorative) – Mark Brady Mar 18 '09 at 18:20

Database constraints

The best way to enforce a database constraint (a constraint which span two or more relations - of which a referential integrity constraint is a particular case with a syntactical shorthand, foreign key/references statements) would be declaratively, by means of the standard SQL statement:

create assertion <name> check (<condition>)

In your case, something like:

create assertion Child_DATE_between_MIN_MAX check (
  not exists (
    select DATE_MIN, DATE, DATE_MAX
      from Parent, Child
     where ID = PARENT_ID
       and DATE < DATE_MIN
       and DATE > DATE_MAX
  )
)

UPDATE: I forgot that <condition> is strictly a boolean, therefore the old code was not correct.

Unfortunately (moderate sarcasm here) most SQL-DBMSes do not implement ASSERTIONs.

So one is left to implement this check procedurally, with stored procedures and triggers or check constraints, if available. In this case one needs to call the same stored procedures for updates to both Parent and Child relations; so one procedure and two triggers or check constraints.

Lurker Indeed's answer shows such solution, but it needs a similar check on Child relation.

Concerns about performances

Damien_The_Unbeliever, in a comment to the same answer, argues:

1) You're possibly incurring a full table scan for every insert/update

Here I will address this objection, because it is very common and may seem valid even for ASSERTIONs (it is likely that this is a popular misconception that persuades users to not ask SQL-DBMS implementors about them, even when they know that it is in the standard).

Well, yes, he is right.. if one uses a DBMS that sucks!

There is an interesting piece of theory that it is possible to apply to integrity maintenance: Differential Relational Calculus (available as .pdf here; you also find adequate treatment of the subject in every decent book about DB theory).

The core idea is that it is possible to enforce integrity constraints often checking only subsets of relations involved by an update. More rigorously, quoting abstract of the linked paper:

... Formal differentiation of first-order sentences is useful in maintaining database integrity, since once a database constraint is expressed as a first-order sentence, its derivative with respect to a transaction provides the necessary and sufficient condition for maintaining integrity. The derivative is often much simpler to test than the original constraint since it maintains integrity differentially by assuming integrity before the transaction, and testing only for new violations. ...

There are other techniques to deal with incremental integrity constraints maintenance. There are no good reasons for DBMS developers to ignore such theory. In fact, the authors of An Amateur's Introduction to Integrity Constraints and Integrity Checking in SQL (.pdf) wrote in the introduction:

1 Introduction

... Commercial relational DBMS products supporting SQL, however (such as, e.g., Oracle [Ora99] or DB2 [IBM99]) do not support the more advanced forms of constraints. Even today, more than 8 years after the SQL'92 standard has been issued, none of these commercial systems supports assertions, the most general form of constraint in SQL! Scientific literature, i.e. research papers, devoted to integrity on the other hand provide a wealth of promising results applicable to very general and powerful forms of integrity constraints. ...

So, please: ask your SQL-DBMS supplier (commercial or free/open source) to implement ASSERTIONs now and with, at least, reasonable performance.

share|improve this answer
    
Very interesting, I never heard about "Assertions". Anyway, on Oracle the assertions can be achieved through Materialized Views, I think that's the reason why Oracle does not implement it. – FerranB Mar 25 '10 at 23:03
    
With a materialized view only? How? Anyway resorting to expedients is wrong: ASSERTIONs are in the standard and are the right thing (there are other parts really horrible in the standard that do not merit to be implemented). So they don't have excuses. – MaD70 Mar 27 '10 at 5:04

I'd go the stored proc and trigger route; one of their major purposes is to ensure data integrity at the DB level.

Most databases also have some form of check constraints, in which pretty much anything you can put in a WHERE clause can be used as a check against the data:

CREATE FUNCTION CheckFnctn()
RETURNS int
AS 
BEGIN
   DECLARE @retval int
   SELECT @retval = COUNT(*) 
   FROM PARENT
   INNER JOIN CHILD ON PARENT.ID = CHILD.PARENT_ID
   WHERE CHILD.DATE < PARENT.DATE_MIN OR CHILD.DATE > PARENT.DATE_MAX
   RETURN @retval
END;
GO
ALTER TABLE CHILD
ADD CONSTRAINT chkDates CHECK (dbo.CheckFnctn() = 0 );
GO
share|improve this answer
    
My two main concerns with that are 1) You're possibly incurring a full table scan for every insert/update, and 2) If the Parent table can be updated, you need to have the same check constraint run on there too. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Mar 17 '09 at 17:26

Okay, in the specific example, I'd go for redundantly storing redundant data. Through a combination of CHECKs and FKs (and super keys), we ensure that the data is always correct, then we wrap a view and triggers around this to hide the implementation details:

create table dbo.Parents (
    ParentID int IDENTITY(1,1) not null,
    ValidFrom datetime not null,
    ValidTo datetime not null,
    /* Natural Key column(s) */
    CONSTRAINT PK_dbo_Parents PRIMARY KEY (ParentID),
    CONSTRAINT UQ_dbo_Parents_DRI UNIQUE (ParentID, ValidFrom, ValidTo),
    /* Unique constraint on Natural Key */
    CONSTRAINT CK_dbo_Parents_ValidDates CHECK (ValidFrom <= ValidTo) /* Semi-open interval */
)
go
alter table dbo.Parents add constraint DF_dbo_Parents_ValidFrom DEFAULT (CURRENT_TIMESTAMP) for ValidFrom
go
alter table dbo.Parents add constraint DF_dbo_Parents_ValidTo DEFAULT (CONVERT(datetime,'99991231')) for ValidTo
go
create table dbo._Children (
    ChildID int IDENTITY(1,1) not null, /* We'll need this in the update trigger */
    ParentID int not null,
    ChildDate datetime not null,
    _ParentValidFrom datetime not null,
    _ParentValidTo datetime not null,
    CONSTRAINT PK_dbo__Children PRIMARY KEY (ChildID),
    CONSTRAINT FK_dbo__Children_Parents FOREIGN KEY (ParentID,_ParentValidFrom,_ParentValidTo) REFERENCES dbo.Parents (ParentID,ValidFrom,ValidTo) ON UPDATE CASCADE,
    CONSTRAINT CK_dbo__Children_ValidDate CHECK (_ParentValidFrom <= ChildDate and ChildDate < _ParentValidTo) /* See, semi-open */
)
go
alter table dbo._Children add constraint DF_dbo__Children_ChildDate DEFAULT (CURRENT_TIMESTAMP) for ChildDate
go
create view dbo.Children (ChildID,ParentID,ChildDate)
with schemabinding
as
select ChildID,ParentID,ChildDate from dbo._Children
go
create trigger dbo.T_Children_I on dbo.Children instead of insert
as
begin
    set nocount on

    insert into dbo._Children (ParentID,ChildDate,_ParentValidFrom,_ParentValidTo)
    select i.ParentID,i.ChildDate,p.ValidFrom,p.ValidTo
    from
    	inserted i
    		inner join
    	dbo.Parents p
    		on
    			i.ParentID = p.ParentID
end
go
create trigger dbo.T_Children_U on dbo.Children instead of update
as
begin
    set nocount on
    if UPDATE(ChildID)
    begin
    	RAISERROR('Updates to ChildID are not allowed',16,1)
    	return
    end

    update c
    set
    	ParentID = i.ParentID,
    	ChildDate = i.ChildDate,
    	_ParentValidFrom = p.ValidFrom,
    	_ParentValidTo = p.ValidTo
    from
    	inserted i
    		inner join
    	dbo._Children c
    		on
    			i.ChildID = c.ChildID
    		inner join
    	dbo.Parents p
    		on
    			i.ParentID = p.ParentID
end
go
insert into dbo.Parents(ValidFrom,ValidTo)
select '20081201','20090101' union all
select '20090201','20090301'
/* (2 row(s) affected) */
go
insert into dbo.Children (ParentID,ChildDate)
select 1,'20081215'
/* (1 row(s) affected) */
go
insert into dbo.Children (ParentID,ChildDate)
select 1,'20090115'
/*
Msg 547, Level 16, State 0, Procedure T_Children_I, Line 6
The INSERT statement conflicted with the CHECK constraint "CK_dbo__Children_ValidDate". The conflict occurred in database "Play", table "dbo._Children".
The statement has been terminated.
*/
go
update dbo.Parents set ValidTo = '20090201' where ParentID = 1
/* (1 row(s) affected) */
go
insert into dbo.Children (ParentID,ChildDate)
select 1,'20090115'
/* (1 row(s) affected) */
go
update dbo.Parents set ValidTo = '20090101' where ParentID = 1
/*
Msg 547, Level 16, State 0, Line 1
The UPDATE statement conflicted with the CHECK constraint "CK_dbo__Children_ValidDate". The conflict occurred in database "Play", table "dbo._Children".
The statement has been terminated.
*/
go
insert into dbo.Children (ParentID,ChildDate)
select 2,'20090215'
/* (1 row(s) affected) */
go
update dbo.Children set ChildDate = '20090115' where ParentID=2 and ChildDate = '20090215'
/*
Msg 547, Level 16, State 0, Procedure T_Children_U, Line 11
The UPDATE statement conflicted with the CHECK constraint "CK_dbo__Children_ValidDate". The conflict occurred in database "Play", table "dbo._Children".
The statement has been terminated.
*/
go
delete from dbo.Children
/* (3 row(s) affected) */
go
/* Clean up after testing */
drop view dbo.Children
drop table dbo._Children
drop table dbo.Parents
go

This is for SQL Server. Tested on 2005, but should work on at least 2000 and 2008 too. A bonus here is that even if the trigger is disabled (e.g. nested triggers are turned off), You cannot end up with wrong data in the base tables

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.