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Very similar to this question but with the difference that my figure can be as large as it needs to be.

I need to generate a whole bunch of vertically-stacked plots in matplotlib. The result will be saved using figsave and viewed on a webpage, so I don't care how tall the final image is as long as the subplots are spaced so they don't overlap.

No matter how big I allow the figure to be, the subplots always seem to overlap.

My code currently looks like

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import my_other_module

titles, x_lists, y_lists = my_other_module.get_data()

fig = plt.figure(figsize=(10,60))
for i, y_list in enumerate(y_lists):
    plt.subplot(len(titles), 1, i)
    plt.xlabel("Some X label")
    plt.ylabel("Some Y label")
    plt.title(titles[i])
    plt.plot(x_lists[i],y_list)
fig.savefig('out.png', dpi=100)
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4 Answers 4

Try using plt.tight_layout

As a quick example:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=4, ncols=4)
fig.tight_layout() # Or equivalently,  "plt.tight_layout()"

plt.show()

Without Tight Layout

enter image description here


With Tight Layout enter image description here

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You can use plt.subplots_adjust to change the spacing between the subplots Link

subplots_adjust(left=None, bottom=None, right=None, top=None, wspace=None, hspace=None)

left  = 0.125  # the left side of the subplots of the figure
right = 0.9    # the right side of the subplots of the figure
bottom = 0.1   # the bottom of the subplots of the figure
top = 0.9      # the top of the subplots of the figure
wspace = 0.2   # the amount of width reserved for blank space between subplots
hspace = 0.5   # the amount of height reserved for white space between subplots
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I've tried messing with hspace, but increasing it only seems to make all of the graphs smaller without resolving the overlap problem. I've tried playing with the other parameters as well, but I don't know what left, right, bottom, and top are actually specifying there. –  mcstrother Jul 1 '11 at 15:27
1  
@mcstrother you can interactively change all 6 of those parameters if you click the 'adjustment' button after showing a plot, then copy them down into the code once you find what works. –  Nick T Dec 10 '13 at 6:00

I found that subplots_adjust(hspace = 0.001) is what ended up working for me. When I use space = None, there is still white space between each plot. Setting it to something very close to zero however seems to force them to line up. What I've uploaded here isn't the most elegant piece of code, but you can see how the hspace works.

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.ticker as tic

fig = plt.figure()

x = np.arange(100)
y = 3.*np.sin(x*2.*np.pi/100.)

for i in range(5):
    temp = 510 + i
    ax = plt.subplot(temp)
    plt.plot(x,y)
    plt.subplots_adjust(hspace = .001)
    temp = tic.MaxNLocator(3)
    ax.yaxis.set_major_locator(temp)
    ax.set_xticklabels(())
    ax.title.set_visible(False)

plt.show()

enter image description here

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import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

fig = plt.figure(figsize=(10,60))
plt.subplots_adjust( ... )

The plt.subplots_adjust method:

def subplots_adjust(*args, **kwargs):
"""
call signature::

  subplots_adjust(left=None, bottom=None, right=None, top=None,
                  wspace=None, hspace=None)

Tune the subplot layout via the
:class:`matplotlib.figure.SubplotParams` mechanism.  The parameter
meanings (and suggested defaults) are::

  left  = 0.125  # the left side of the subplots of the figure
  right = 0.9    # the right side of the subplots of the figure
  bottom = 0.1   # the bottom of the subplots of the figure
  top = 0.9      # the top of the subplots of the figure
  wspace = 0.2   # the amount of width reserved for blank space between subplots
  hspace = 0.2   # the amount of height reserved for white space between subplots

The actual defaults are controlled by the rc file
"""
fig = gcf()
fig.subplots_adjust(*args, **kwargs)
draw_if_interactive()

or

fig = plt.figure(figsize=(10,60))
fig.subplots_adjust( ... )

The size of the picture matters.

"I've tried messing with hspace, but increasing it only seems to make all of the graphs smaller without resolving the overlap problem."

Thus to make more white space and keep the sub plot size the total image needs to be bigger.

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