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After spending a lot of time with variants to this question I'm wondering if someone can help me optimize this query or indexes.

I have three temp tables ref1, ref2, ref3 all defined as below, with ref1 and ref2 each having about 6000 rows and ref3 only 3 rows:

CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE ref1 (
  id INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  val INT,
  PRIMARY KEY (id)
)
ENGINE = MEMORY;

The slow query is against a table like so, with about 1M rows:

CREATE TABLE t1 (
  d DATETIME NOT NULL,
  id1 INT NOT NULL,
  id2 INT NOT NULL,
  id3 INT NOT NULL,
  x INT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (id1, d, id2, id3)
)
ENGINE = INNODB;

The query in question:

SELECT id1, SUM(x)
  FROM t1
  INNER JOIN ref1 ON ref1.id = t1.id1
  INNER JOIN ref2 ON ref2.id = t1.id2
  INNER JOIN ref3 ON ref3.id = t1.id3
  WHERE d BETWEEN '2011-03-01' AND '2011-04-01'
  GROUP BY id1;

The temp tables are used to filter the result set down to just the items a user is looking for.

EXPLAIN

+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+------------------+------+---------------------------------+
| id | select_type | table | type   | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref              | rows | Extra                           |
+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+------------------+------+---------------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | ref1  | ALL    | PRIMARY       | NULL    | NULL    | NULL             | 6000 | Using temporary; Using filesort |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | t1    | ref    | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 4       | med31new.ref1.id |   38 | Using where                     |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | ref3  | ALL    | PRIMARY       | NULL    | NULL    | NULL             |    3 | Using where; Using join buffer  |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | ref2  | eq_ref | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 4       | med31new.t1.id2  |    1 |                                 |
+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+------------------+------+---------------------------------+

(on a different system with ~5M rows EXPLAIN show t1 first in the list, with "Using where; Using index; Using temporary; Using filesort")

Is there something obvious I'm missing that would prevent the temporary table from being used?

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What returns this query: SELECT count(*) FROM t1 WHERE d BETWEEN '2011-03-01' AND '2011-04-01'? –  Karolis Jul 7 '11 at 9:19
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Add an index on JUST the DATE. Since that is the criteria of the first table, and the others are just joins, it will be optimized against the DATE first... the joins are secondary.

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the date index had no effect (MySQL ignores it). My understanding is that the GROUP BY id1 will need an index as well, hence the PK on (id1, d, ...). –  Eric McNeill Jul 1 '11 at 0:18
    
Marking this as the answer because in some cases it does fix the problem, although fairly often I have to use an optimizer hint (USE INDEX...). In other cases a FORCE INDEX on one of the filter tables is required, typically when it has just a few rows and MySQL wants to do a table scan on it. And in cases where I have a LIMIT I've found I need to force the index on the columns in the GROUP BY rather than using the column in the WHERE. I don't prefer to use optimizer hints, but I'm finding them pretty crucial in some cases. –  Eric McNeill Sep 12 '11 at 17:26
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First filesort does not mean a file is writtent on disk to perform the sort, it's the name of the quicksort algorithm in mySQL, check what-does-using-filesort-mean-in-mysql.

So the problematic keyword in your explain is Using temporary, not Using filesort. For that you can play with tmp_table_size & max_heap_table_size(put the same values on both) to allow more in-memory work and avoid temporary table creation, check this link on the subject with remarks about documentation mistakes.

Then you could try different index policy, and see the results, but do not try to avoid filesort.

Last thing, not related, you make a SUM(x) but x can takes NULL values, SUM(COALESCE(x) , 0) is maybe better if you do not want any NULL value on the Group to make your sum being NULL.

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You're right that I'm really trying to avoid the temp table. For the heaps I've tried several values up to 1G each with no effect, which makes me think it's a logic issue rather than resources. Thanks for the comments. –  Eric McNeill Jul 1 '11 at 0:11
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Isn't this:

SELECT id1, SUM(x)
  FROM t1
  INNER JOIN ref1 ON ref1.id = t1.id1
  INNER JOIN ref2 ON ref2.id = t1.id2
  INNER JOIN ref3 ON ref3.id = t1.id3
  WHERE d BETWEEN '2011-03-01' AND '2011-04-01'
  GROUP BY id1;

exactly equivalent to:

select id1, SUM(x)
  FROM t1
  WHERE d BETWEEN '2011-03-01' AND '2011-04-01'
  group by id1;

What are the extra tables being used for? I think the temp table mentioned in another answer is referring to MySQL creating a temp table during query execution. If you're hoping to create a sub-query (or table) that will minimize number of operations required in a join, that might speed up the query, but I don't see joined data being selected.

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No, those aren't equivalent. The ref tables are filters, used to reduce the result set. For example, if t1.id1 has values 1-10 and ref1.id only has 1-3, then the final result set won't include any rows where t1.id1 > 3. It's similar to saying "WHERE t1.id1 IN (SELECT DISTINCT id FROM ref1)", only more peformant. –  Eric McNeill Sep 12 '11 at 17:31
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