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I receive a file that contains the following:

\direcotry1\directory2\directory3\file1
\direcotry1\file2
\direcotry1\directory2\directory3\directory4\file3
\direcotry1\file4
\direcotry1\directory2\file5
file6

The amount of files in the file and the amount of directories are variable.

What I need is the path only.

\direcotry1\directory2\directory3\ for file1
\direcotry1\ for file2
\direcotry1\directory2\directory3\directory4\ for file3
\direcotry1\ for file4
\direcotry1\directory2\ for file5
and nothing for file6

I used the variable %%~pi which works for all except for the last one. For the last one it returns \cft\
I guess the \cft\ is returned as the program that is calling the bat file launches it from there.

FOR /F %%i in (test.txt) DO (
  echo %%~pi
  command1
  command2
)

Does anyone know how I can avoid that the batfile returns \cft\? I want the bat to return nothing when there's no path.

Thanks a lot in advance for your help.

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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

After doing some testing, it appears that "%%~pi" will prefix the current directory to every element that does not start with "\". I gather that it assumes this is the case since that would be the file you'd open if you just used "file" - similarly "x\y" would be the file "\x\y".

For example, the following script:

@echo off
for /f %%i in (test.txt) DO (
    echo %%~pi
)

when run on the following file:

\directory1\directory2\directory3\file1
\directory1\file2
\directory1\directory2\directory3\directory4\file3
\directory1\file4
\directory1\directory2\file5
file6
x\y
\z

will produce (I'm in the \Documents and Settings\Administrator directory):

\directory1\directory2\directory3\
\directory1\
\directory1\directory2\directory3\directory4\
\directory1\
\directory1\directory2\
\Documents and Settings\Administrator\
\Documents and Settings\Administrator\x\
\

So the answer is simple. Detect first those lines that don't begin with "\" and treat them specially. The following script:

@echo off
setlocal enableextensions enabledelayedexpansion
for /f %%i in (test.txt) DO (
    set ch0=%%i
    set ch0=!ch0:~0,1!
    if not "!ch0!"=="\" (
        echo.
    ) else (
        echo.%%~pi
    )
)
endlocal

generates your desired output, as follows:

\directory1\directory2\directory3\
\directory1\
\directory1\directory2\directory3\directory4\
\directory1\
\directory1\directory2\


\

The setlocal/endlocal is something I put in most of my scripts nowadays since it prevents environment variables from leaking up one level and delayed expansion is brilliant (using "!" instead of "%").

I use a ch0 temporary variable to get the first character of the file ("!ch0:~0,1!" is a substring operator, "get one character at offset 0 of ch0 variable", and you can use the "%" version as well if you're not doing delayed expansion).

Then I compare it to "\". If it is a slash, I echo the "%%~pi", otherwise I just output a blank line as per your spec.

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How can I use AND OR in batch? if variable==1 OR variable==2 ( command1 command2 ) –  vesperdolphin Mar 18 '09 at 10:30
    
thanks for your reply. I'm testing –  vesperdolphin Mar 18 '09 at 10:30
    
So I want to try if not "!ch0!"=="/" || "!ch0!"=="\" ( but it doesn't seem to work –  vesperdolphin Mar 18 '09 at 10:35
    
I don't have a Windows box handy to test but you could just "if "!ch0!"=="\" set ch0=/", "if not "!ch0!"=="/" ...". This would force "\" to become "/" (and "/" will stay "/") then you just check for "/". –  paxdiablo Mar 18 '09 at 12:38
    
AND can similarly be done: if cond1 (if cond2 (action-if-both-true)). –  paxdiablo Mar 18 '09 at 12:40
show 5 more comments

You can store the directory you want to ignore in a variable:

FOR %%i in (file) do set ignoredir=%%~pi
FOR /F %%i in (test.txt) DO (
  if not %%~pi == %ignoredir% echo %%~pi
)
set ignoredir=

This works as expected. Output:

\direcotry1\directory2\directory3\
\direcotry1\
\direcotry1\directory2\directory3\directory4\
\direcotry1\
\direcotry1\directory2\
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Hi what's in file? The output is variable so I never know upfront which directories I will get. –  vesperdolphin Mar 17 '09 at 14:02
    
Note that the first FOR doesn't read from a file, it just parses the directory for the string "file" (could also be "fsdjlkbfds") which results in the actual directory (was "\cft\" in your case) so it can be ignored afterwards. –  schnaader Mar 17 '09 at 14:18
    
+1. Works as expected. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Mar 17 '09 at 14:34
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It seems this is due to the missing backslash in front of file6.
Isn't it possible to change your inputs to always have a leading backslash?

Your input would then become

\directory1\directory2\directory3\file1 
\directory1\file2 
\directory1\directory2\directory3\directory4\file3 
\directory1\file4 
\directory1\directory2\file5 
\file6
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unfortunately I can't put the leading backslash. It's an output file that comes from an FTP server. I do for example a dir test* and it returns me a file that contains all the files that start with test. –  vesperdolphin Mar 17 '09 at 13:55
    
@vesperdolphin - I'd go with schnaader's response then. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Mar 17 '09 at 14:32
    
How can I use AND OR in batch? if variable==1 OR variable==2 ( command1 command2 ) –  vesperdolphin Mar 18 '09 at 10:31
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Update2:

As Lieven noted, if you can enforce that everything starts with "\" in your test.txt file, then you can use this code:

@echo off
FOR /F %%i in (test.txt) DO (
  if not "%%~pi" == "\" echo %%~pi
)

Update:

Actually, after reading your question again, I noticed that what you need is an EXIST statement..

FOR /F %%i in (test.txt) DO ( if exist %%i echo %%~pi command1 command2 )

Is this what you need?

My original post...

When you call the batch file, simply do:

yourbatchfile.bat >nul 2>nul

Anything going to stdout and stderr (your screen display) will be piped to no where, and no appear. Note that absolutely nothing will be output from that batch file...

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Your updated approach won't work if there is a file named file6 in the actual path. –  schnaader Mar 17 '09 at 13:21
    
You're right. I'm doing another update. –  Wadih M. Mar 17 '09 at 13:22
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Batch files are ok for simple tasks, but as your demands grows you should think about switching to better scripting language.

Example in Python:

import os.path
for line in open('file.txt'):
  line = line.strip()
  print os.path.dirname(line)
  print os.path.basename(line)

This code fragment is pretty obvious even without comments.

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