Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got a program where I've got a lot of nested if/switch statements which were repeated in several places. I tried to extract that out and put the switches in a template method class, and then allow clients to overload which switch branches they wanted to specifically handle using overloading:

class TraitsA {};
class TraitsB : public TraitsA {};

class Foo
{
    bool traitsB;
public:
    // Whether or not a Foo has traitsB is determined at runtime. It is a
    // function of the input to the program and therefore cannot be moved to
    // compile time traits (like the Iterators do)
    Foo() : traitsB(false) {}
    virtual ~Foo() {}
    bool HasTraitsB() const { return traitsB; }
    void SetTraitsB() { traitsB = true; }
};

class SpecificFoo : public Foo
{
};

template <typename Client> //CRTP
class MergeFoo
{
protected:
    Foo DoMerge(Foo&, const Foo&, int, TraitsA)
    {
        // Do things to merge generic Foo
    }
public:
    // Merge is a template method that puts all the nasty switch statements
    // in one place.
    // Specific mergers implement overloads of DoMerge to specify their
    // behavior...
    Foo Merge(Foo* lhs, const Foo* rhs, int operation)
    {
        const Client& thisChild = *static_cast<const Client*>(this);

        SpecificFoo* lhsSpecific = dynamic_cast<SpecificFoo*>(lhs);
        const SpecificFoo* rhsSpecific = dynamic_cast<const SpecificFoo*>(rhs);

        // In the real code these if's are significantly worse
        if (lhsSpecific && rhsSpecific)
        {
            if (lhs->HasTraitsB())
            {
                return thisChild.DoMerge(*lhsSpecific, 
                               *rhsSpecific, 
                               operation,
                               TraitsB());
            }
            else
            {
                return thisChild.DoMerge(*lhsSpecific,
                               *rhsSpecific,
                               operation,
                               TraitsA());
            }
        }
        else
        {
            if (lhs->HasTraitsB())
            {
                return thisChild.DoMerge(*lhs, *rhs, operation, TraitsB());
            }
            else
            {
                return thisChild.DoMerge(*lhs, *rhs, operation, TraitsA());
            }
        }
    }
};

class ClientMergeFoo : public MergeFoo<ClientMergeFoo>
{
    friend class MergeFoo<ClientMergeFoo>;
    Foo DoMerge(SpecificFoo&, const SpecificFoo&, int, TraitsA)
    {
        // Do things for specific foo with traits A or traits B
    }
};

class ClientMergeFooTwo : public MergeFoo<ClientMergeFoo>
{
    friend class MergeFoo<ClientMergeFooTwo>;
    Foo DoMerge(SpecificFoo&, const SpecificFoo&, int, TraitsB)
    {
        // Do things for specific foo with traits B only
    }
    Foo DoMerge(Foo&, const Foo&, int, TraitsA)
    {
        // Do things for specific foo with TraitsA, or for any Foo
    }
};

However, this fails to compile (At least in ClientMergeFooTwo's case), saying it cannot convert a Foo& into a SpecificFoo&. Any ideas why it's failing that conversion instead of choosing the perfectly good generic overload in MergeFoo?

EDIT: Well, this psuedocode example apparently didn't do so well given how fast I tried to write it. I have corrected some of the mistakes...

share|improve this question
    
Post the error, indicating the line number as well. –  Nawaz Jun 30 '11 at 23:15
    
@Nawaz: I can't -- this is not the original code and I cannot post the original code here. It is failing to compile the call to DoMerge and it's failing due to implicit conversions. –  Billy ONeal Jun 30 '11 at 23:43
    
Does your example actually fail on your box? I just tested it with VS2010 and I got no error. –  zneak Jul 1 '11 at 0:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Any ideas why it's failing that conversion instead of choosing the perfectly good generic overload in MergeFoo?

Yes, because of name hiding rules. If a function in the derived class has the same name as a function in the base class, the base class function is "hidden", it doesn't even look at the parameters of the involved function.

That said, the solution is easy: Make the base class version available in the derived class with a simple using MergeFoo::DoMerge in the public part.

share|improve this answer
const thisChild& = *static_cast<const Client*>(this);

I couldn't understand this? Where is the type (or the variable)? Did you mean this:

const Client & thisChild = *static_cast<const Client*>(this);

And in the following

SpecificFoo* rhsSpecific = dynamic_cast<const SpecificFoo*>(rhs);

there is mismatch in const-ness, as in the target you forgot const.

share|improve this answer
    
You are correct on all counts. My crappy thrown-together parody of the real code was thrown together too quickly :( –  Billy ONeal Jun 30 '11 at 23:46
class ClientMergeFooTwo : public MergeFoo<ClientMergeFoo>

This could be the cause of the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Oops. The real code does have a const. :) –  Billy ONeal Jun 30 '11 at 23:43

Could use a little more info on where it's failing, but it looks like in order to do what you mean to do, you need to be calling Client::DoMerge() instead of just calling DoMerge(), when in the public Merge function of MergeFoo.

share|improve this answer
    
It is failing on one of the calls to DoMerge. I don't believe calling Client::DoMerge is explicitly required because I already cast this to be of type Client. –  Billy ONeal Jun 30 '11 at 23:47
    
You did, but then you need to call thisChild.DoMerge() to get the desired effect. –  Nathan Monteleone Jul 1 '11 at 16:00
    
:sigh: My transcription of the idea of this code was horrendous. :( Sorry for the confusion! –  Billy ONeal Jul 1 '11 at 17:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.