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I'm currently trying to get an ANN to play a video game and and I was hoping to get some help from the wonderful community here.

I've settled on Diablo 2. Game play is thus in real-time and from an isometric viewpoint, with the player controlling a single avatar whom the camera is centered on.

To make things concrete, the task is to get your character x experience points without having its health drop to 0, where experience point are gained through killing monsters. Here is an example of the gameplay:

here

Now, since I want the net to operate based solely on the information it gets from the pixels on the screen, it must learn a very rich representation in order to play efficiently, since this would presumably require it to know (implicitly at least) how divide the game world up into objects and how to interact with them.

And all of this information must be taught to the net... somehow. I can't for the life of me think of how to train this thing. My only idea is have a separate program visually extract something innately good/bad in the game (e.g. health, gold, experience) from the screen, and then use that stat in a reinforcement learning procedure. I think that will be part of the answer, but I don't think it'll be enough; there are just too many levels of abstraction from raw visual input to goal-oriented behavior for such limited feedback to train a net within my lifetime.

So, my question: what other ways can you think of to train a net to do at least some part of this task? preferably without making thousands of labeled examples...

Just for a little more direction: I'm looking for some other sources of reinforcement learning and/or any unsupervised methods for extracting useful information in this setting. Or a supervised algorithm if you can think of a way of getting labeled data out of a game world without having to manually label it.

UPDATE(04/27/12):

Strangely, I'm still working on this and seem to be making progress. The biggest secret to getting a ANN controller to work is to use the most advanced ANN architectures appropriate to the task. Hence I've been using a deep belief net composed of factored conditional restricted Boltzmann machines that I've trained in an unsupervised manner (on video of me playing the game) before fine tuning with temporal difference back-propagation (i.e. reinforcement learning with standard feedforward ANNs).

Still looking for more valuable input though, especially on the problem of action selection in real-time and how to encode color images for ANN processing :-)

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Cool. Then maybe you could have it drive a car or fly a plane –  Romain Hippeau Jul 1 '11 at 0:35
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Check out this paper. :D ri.cmu.edu/pub_files/pub2/pomerleau_dean_1992_1/… –  zergylord Jul 1 '11 at 3:35
    
A big difference between the driving problem in the paper and a game is that in the driving problem visual input is a sufficiently complete state representation: if there is an obstacle on the right — turn left, if there is an obstacle on the left — turn right. However, in a game, you often have to make decisions based on things that are not displayed on the screen. Any time you enter a shop, it might look the same, but you need to buy different items. –  Don Reba Jul 1 '11 at 4:03
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Yeah, just pointing to the paper for Romain's sake, I realize there aren't many similarities; just an interesting read. –  zergylord Jul 1 '11 at 19:12
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To be best of my recollection Diablo 2 uses easily extracted sprite sheets. It should be fairly simple to tie objects (player, enemies etc...) to a list of associated sprites. It does't solve the problem of objects being obscured by one another, but it's a start. –  Ryan Jenkins Jul 3 '11 at 19:40

7 Answers 7

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I can see that you are worried about how to train the ANN, but this project hides a complexity that you might not be aware of. Object/character recognition on computer games through image processing it's a highly challenging task (not say crazy for FPS and RPG games). I don't doubt of your skills and I'm also not saying it can't be done, but you can easily spend 10x more time working on recognizing stuff than implementing the ANN itself (assuming you already have experience with digital image processing techniques).

I think your idea is very interesting and also very ambitious. At this point you might want to reconsider it. I sense that this project is something you are planning for the university, so if the focus of the work is really ANN you should probably pick another game, something more simple.

I remember that someone else came looking for tips on a different but somehow similar project not too long ago. It's worth checking it out.

On the other hand, there might be better/easier approaches for identifying objects in-game if you're accepting suggestions. But first, let's call this project for what you want it to be: a smart-bot.

One method for implementing bots accesses the memory of the game client to find relevant information, such as the location of the character on the screen and it's health. Reading computer memory is trivial, but figuring out exactly where in memory to look for is not. Memory scanners like Cheat Engine can be very helpful for this.

Another method, which works under the game, involves manipulating rendering information. All objects of the game must be rendered to the screen. This means that the locations of all 3D objects will eventually be sent to the video card for processing. Be ready for some serious debugging.

In this answer I briefly described 2 methods to accomplish what you want through image processing. If you are interested in them you can find more about them on Exploiting Online Games (chapter 6), an excellent book on the subject.

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The problem you are pursuing is intractable in the way you have defined it. It is usually a mistake to think that a neural network would "magically" learn a rich reprsentation of a problem. A good fact to keep in mind when deciding whether ANN is the right tool for a task is that it is an interpolation method. Think, whether you can frame your problem as finding an approximation of a function, where you have many points from this function and lots of time for designing the network and training it.

The problem you propose does not pass this test. Game control is not a function of the image on the screen. There is a lot of information the player has to keep in memory. For a simple example, it is often true that every time you enter a shop in a game, the screen looks the same. However, what you buy depends on the circumstances. No matter how complicated the network, if the screen pixels are its input, it would always perform the same action upon entering the store.

Besides, there is the problem of scale. The task you propose is simply too complicated to learn in any reasonable amount of time. You should see aigamedev.com for how game AI works. Artitificial Neural Networks have been used successfully in some games, but in very limited manner. Game AI is difficult and often expensive to develop. If there was a general approach of constructing functional neural networks, the industry would have most likely seized on it. I recommend that you begin with much, much simpler examples, like tic-tac-toe.

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Fair enough. You could call most anything resembling a network an ANN, but it could hardly lead to a substantive discussion. :) –  Don Reba Jul 1 '11 at 3:37
    
Heh yeah... I should've explained my motivation in more depth. I know there are better ways to make game AIs, but I'm doing this to push the limits of the ANN simulator I've been upgrading. See: stanford.edu/group/pdplab/pdphandbook –  zergylord Jul 1 '11 at 3:42
    
In any case, Don Reba is right, I too don't think it will be feasible to learn a strategy for something like Diablo without incorporating a lot of prior knowledge and extracting useful features that a reinforcement learning approach could be based upon. Just learning from the video input will be extremely hard if not impossible using today's computers. –  ahans Jul 1 '11 at 8:33
    
I agree that this will require knowledge/features prior to solving the task, which is really the heart of what I'm asking: How can I get such knowledge into a neural network architecture given this problem setting? –  zergylord Jul 1 '11 at 19:26
    
I rewrote the answer and removed the terminology rant, so the comments don't make sense anymore. Sorry about that. :) –  Don Reba Jul 6 '11 at 3:57
up vote 10 down vote
+100

Seems like the heart of this project is exploring what is possible with an ANN, so I would suggest picking a game where you don't have to deal with image processing (which from other's answers on here, seems like a really difficult task in a real-time game). You could use the Starcraft API to build your bot, they give you access to all relevant game state.

http://code.google.com/p/bwapi/

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Contrary to some of my collegues above, I do not think this problem is intractable. But it is surely a hella hard one!

The first problem as pointed out above is that of the representation of the state of the game: you can't represent the full state with just a single image, you need to maintain some kind of memorization (health but also objects equipped and items available to use, quests and goals, etc.). To fetch such informations you have two ways: either by directly accessing the game data, which is the most reliable and easy; or either you can create an abstract representation of these informations by implementing some simple procedures (open inventory, take a screenshot, extract the data). Of course, extracting data from a screenshot will either have you to put in some supervised procedure (that you define completely) or unsupervised (via a machine learning algorithm, but then it'll scale up a lot the complexity...). For unsupervised machine learning, you will need to use a quite recent kind of algorithms called structural learning algorithms (which learn the structure of data rather than how to classify them or predict a value). One such algorithm is the Recursive Neural Network (not to confuse with Recurrent Neural Network) by Richard Socher: http://techtalks.tv/talks/54422/

Then, another problem is that even when you have fetched all the data you need, the game is only partially observable. Thus you need to inject more abstract informations, for example the location of your avatar, but also the location of quest items, goals and enemies outside the screen. You may maybe look into Mixture Particle Filters by Vermaak 2003 for this.

Also, you need to have an autonomous agent, with goals dynamically generated. A well-known architecture you can try is BDI agents, but you will probably have to tweak it for this architecture to work in your practical case. As an alternative, there is also the Recursive Petri Net, which you can probably combine with all kinds of variations of the petri nets to achieve what you want since it is a very well studied and flexible framework, with great formalization and proofs procedures.

And at last, even if you do all the above, you will need to find a way to emulate the game in accelerated speed (using a video may be nice, but the problem is that your algorithm will only spectate without control, and being able to try for itself is very important for learning). Indeed, it is well-known that current state-of-the-art algorithm takes a lot more time to learn the same thing a human can learn (even more so with reinforcement learning), thus if can't speed up the process (if you can't speed up the game time), your algorithm won't even converge in a single lifetime...

To conclude, what you want to achieve here is at the limit (maybe beyond) current state-of-the-art algorithms. I think it may be possible, but even if it is, you are going to spend a hella lot of time, because this is not a theoretical problem but a practical problem you are approaching here, and thus you need to implement and combine a lot of different AI approaches in order to solve it.

Several decades of research with a whole team working on it would maybe not suffice, so if you are alone and working on it in part-time (as you probably have a job for a living) you may spend a whole lifetime without reaching anywhere near a working solution.

So my most important advice here would be that you lower down your expectations, and try to reduce the complexity of your problem by using all the information you can, and avoid as much as possible relying on screenshots, and simplify some problems by implementing supervised procedures, do not let your algorithm learn everything. Then, if you can get something to work quite well, you can try to complexify your problem and replace supervised procedures and memory game data by unsupervised machine learning algorithms on screenshots.

Good luck, and if it works, make sure to publish an article, you can surely get fame for solving such a hard problem!

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Well assuming at any time you could generate a set of 'outcomes' (might involve probabilities) from a set of all possible 'moves', and that there is some notion of consistency in the game (eg you can play level X over and over again), you could start with N neural networks with random weights, and have each of them play the game in the following way:

1) For every possible 'move', generate a list of possible 'outcomes' (with associated probabilities) 2) For each outcome, use your neural network to determine an associated 'worth' (score) of the 'outcome' (eg a number between -1 and 1, 1 being the best possible outcome, -1 being the worst) 3) Choose the 'move' leading to the highest prob * score 4) If the move led to a 'win' or 'lose', stop, otherwise go back to step 1.

After a certain amount of time (or a 'win'/'lose'), evaluate how close the neural network was to the 'goal' (this will probably involve some domain knowledge). Then throw out the 50% (or some other percentage) of NNs that were farthest away from the goal, do crossover/mutation of the top 50%, and run the new set of NNs again. Continue running until a satisfactory NN comes out.

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Ah, adding a GA into the mix, interesting. Unfortunately, since I'm having the network actually send keypresses/mouse movements as actions, I'd need one physical computer per network >.< Another problem is that the environment's state space isn't discrete (well technically it is, but at a very fine grain). For example, imagine the possible outcome associated with a mouse click: A character under the net's control might move or attack, but enemies could be move as well, and there would be pixel-wise differences in the environment from things like shadows and weather effects. –  zergylord Jul 1 '11 at 19:09
    
Well from my perspective there's only so much you can do with a neural net. Seems like at best it could be used as a learnable heuristic function of some notion of a discrete state space. To incorporate the variability of the enemy, you would probably have to use some other heuristic, then you could use that to create a set of possible outcome states per move with associated probabilities. Also, as long as there is a static notion of initial and final configuration, you could just run each neural net one at a time. –  tstramer Jul 1 '11 at 21:59

As a first step you might look at the difference of consecutive frames. You have to distinguish between background and actual monster sprites. I guess the world may also contain animations. In order to find those I would have the character move around and collect everything that moves with the world into a big background image/animation.

You could detect and and identify enemies with correlation (using FFT). However if the animations repeat pixel-exact it will be faster to just look at a few pixel values. Your main task will be to write a robust system that will identify when a new object appears on the screen and will gradually all the frames of the sprite frame to a database. Probably you have to build models for weapon effects as well. Those can should be subtracted so that they don't clutter your opponent database.

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Being familiar with the Diablo II game, I can say that it uses 256 colors (unless some mode uses high or true color). It also makes heavy use of sprites to display different objects. If you are able to extract some sprites (even from screenshot) you might train your tool to recognize objects based on the sprite (for instance a dropped 'Minor Healing Potion' will always look the same). If I get deeper into the Diablo II specific stuff however, there will arise more questions too. Good luck –  Ivaylo Slavov Jul 5 '11 at 11:03

I think your best bet would be a complex architecture involving a few/may networks: i.e. one recognizing and responding to items, one for the shop, one for combat (maybe here you would need one for enemy recognition, one for attacks), etc.

Then try to think of the simplest possible Diablo II gameplay, probably a Barbarian. Then keep it simple at first, like Act I, first area only.

Then I guess valuable 'goals' would be disappearance of enemy objects, and diminution of health bar (scored inversely).

Once you have these separate, 'simpler' tasks taken care of, you can use a 'master' ANN to decide which sub-ANN to activate.

As for training, I see only three options: you could use the evolutionary method described above, but then you need to manually select the 'winners', unless you code a whole separate program for that. You could have the networks 'watch' someone play. Here they will learn to emulate a player or group of player's style. The network tries to predict the player's next action, gets reinforced for a correct guess, etc. If you actually get the ANN you want this could be done with video gameplay, no need for actual live gameplay. Finally you could let the network play the game, having enemy deaths, level ups, regained health, etc. as positive reinforcement and player deaths, lost health, etc. as negative reinforcement. But seeing how even a simple network requires thousands of concrete training steps to learn even simple tasks, you would need a lot of patience for this one.

All in all your project is very ambitious. But I for one think it could 'in theory be done', given enough time.

Hope it helps and good luck!

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