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I have a server listening data from clients. Once a client sends data, it will go into a thread. Thus, each thread has a data. revFeaturePoints is the data which the server receives from clients.

Each revFeaturePoints has a float array, I want to compute the Euclidean distance between different revFeaturePoints in different thread?

I do not know how can let one thread to access another revFeaturePoints in other threads?

Here is the code:

public class MyServer {

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException{
    ServerSocket serverSocket = null;

    //bind a serverSocket to the port and listen
    try{
        serverSocket = new ServerSocket(8888);
        System.out.println("Listening: 8888");
    }catch(IOException e){
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

    while(true)
        new MyServerThread(serverSocket.accept()).start();
}   
}

public class MyServerThread  extends Thread{
//Create a socket for each client
private Socket socket = null;
private ObjectInputStream dataInputStream = null;
private ObjectOutputStream dataOutputStream = null;
private ArrayList<FeaturePointList> revFeaturePoints = null;

//constructor
public MyServerThread(Socket socket){
    super("MyServerThread");
    this.socket = socket;
}

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public void run(){
    try{            
        dataOutputStream = new ObjectOutputStream(socket.getOutputStream());
        dataInputStream = new ObjectInputStream(socket.getInputStream());
        System.out.println("ip: "+ socket.getInetAddress());
        revFeaturePoints = (ArrayList<FeaturePointList>) dataInputStream.readObject();          

    }catch(IOException e){
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    } 
    finally{
        if(socket!=null){
            try{
                socket.close();
            }catch(IOException e){
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
        if(dataInputStream!=null){
            try{
                dataInputStream.close();
            }catch(IOException e){
                e.printStackTrace();
            }               
        }
        if(dataOutputStream!=null){
            try{
                dataOutputStream.close();
            }catch(IOException e){
                e.printStackTrace();
            }               
        }

    }
}

}

share|improve this question
    
You'd better show some more code. The code you presented is totally irrelevant to the question. What is your implementation of MyServerThread? Have you thought about anything at all? –  Bruno Reis Jul 1 '11 at 0:59
    
Also: what exactly do you mean by "compare one data with data in other threads"? If you state clearly what you are trying to achieve, maybe you'd get a better answer... –  Bruno Reis Jul 1 '11 at 1:02
    
You might want to look at the Memoizer from jcip –  Ron Jul 1 '11 at 1:09
    
@Bruno Reis I just updated MyServerThread code and the question, please take a look. –  wzb5210 Jul 1 '11 at 1:12
    
@wzb5210: I still don't have a clue about what you mean by "compare one data with data in other threads". Your code shows nothing about it. –  Bruno Reis Jul 1 '11 at 1:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A simple way would be putting a synchronized method in MyServerThread that returns the data.

Another way of doing it would be to use a BlockingQueue and place the data result in a queue and taking the results from this as a producer-consumer pattern. See here for a way of doing this.

share|improve this answer
    
how to distinguish the returned data of different thread if I put a synchronized method? –  wzb5210 Jul 1 '11 at 0:40
    
Your best off making all methods that set or return data in MyServerThread synchronized. Which will only allow one thread at a time to access its data. I'm not quite sure I understand what you mean by distinguishing the returned data of a different thread? Do you mean tell which thread the data returned came from? –  adamjmarkham Jul 1 '11 at 1:23
    
If only one thread can access its data, can the thread access data in other thread? How does the thread tell data from which thread? –  wzb5210 Jul 1 '11 at 1:30
    
I think you misunderstand what synchronized does. Java has a concept of locks and each class/object has one lock. When a thread calls a synchronized method it must obtain the objects lock. If another thread has the lock then it must wait until the other thread is finished with the object and releases the lock. I think it may be better if you use a producer-consumer pattern which I linked you to above. Please go through the concurrency tutorial here if still confused it will help: download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/concurrency –  adamjmarkham Jul 1 '11 at 1:37
    
Thanks a lot. I will read it carefully. –  wzb5210 Jul 1 '11 at 1:44

If your MyServerThread class stashes the data into a field, you can access that field from multiple instances of MyServerThread.

share|improve this answer
    
what do you mean of stashing the data into a field? This is my received data. revFeaturePoints = (ArrayList<FeaturePointList>) dataInputStream.readObject(); –  wzb5210 Jul 1 '11 at 0:38
    
@wzb5210: Just make revFeaturePoints a field. –  Chris Jester-Young Jul 1 '11 at 0:48
    
Could you give me an example? I have no idea of it. –  wzb5210 Jul 1 '11 at 0:51
1  
@wzb5210 A field (aka object attribute) in your MyServer class. Chris is here (presumably) assuming that you only need a single variable holding the 'last' (?) written revFeaturePoints. If you go this route, make sure you make friends with volatile keyword. You will also need to serialize access to this field (via locks or synchronized keyword.) Of course, this is guaranteed to give you terrible performance due to interminable memory coherence protocols kicking in at the cpu level. You are better off with a single threaded server if this is indeed what you are trying to do;or go NIO. –  alphazero Jul 1 '11 at 7:54

You can share the data among threads by using a shared structure and correct synchronization. For example, you could have a ConcurrentHashMap<'threadname', data> in MyServerThread where each thread puts its data and search for data in other threads.

That said, you should evaluate your architecture. If N threads have to check what the other N-1 threads are doing with data, you are preparing a recipe for performance disaster. Probably, what you would like to do is to create some layering in your architecture, where a number of ServerThreads are gathering the request and placing them in a concurrent shared structure (e.g queues). Then another set of workers are comparing and processing the data and producing results in a collaborative system. Have a look at the producer-consumer pattern.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for you suggestion, I will have a look of the example. –  wzb5210 Jul 1 '11 at 1:20

[really a comment but won't fit ;)]

maasg's answer is quite correct in the general sense, but I believe you are right now looking at design difficulties and not Java threaded implementation per se.

You server (as is) fires off a disposable thread on each connect request, and this thread simply reads one object from the client and then closes the connection. The passed object is put in a (server thread) instance scoped object (which is duly garbage collected after you exit run()).

It is completely unclear -- and thus the impression that this is a design problem -- how you determine which 2 threads to compare, or for that matter, what guarantees you have that there will be (always) 2 concurrent threads to begin with.

Logically, you clearly have some domain specific association between a server thread and some meaningful matter in your domain. This relationship needs to be embodied in code, but first we need to understand what is this distinction and relationship.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 absolutely agree. The transient nature of threads does not warranty that you have something to compare with or that what you compared a moment ago is still valid. The answer to the question relates to synchronization and concurrency of shared data structures, but there're deeper architectural issues here that, when solved, will make concurrency a lot easier to deal with. –  maasg Jul 1 '11 at 7:31

Objects aren't 'in different threads'. Objects are members of other different objects, usually referenced via 'get' methods. Forget about the thread issue entirely, it is irrelevant. You just want to compare a member of object A with a member of object B. This is just business as usual.

share|improve this answer
    
Some error here? –  EJP Jul 1 '11 at 5:42
    
Maybe my title is not suitable. Object here actually is data. I what to compute the Euclidean distance between data in different threads. –  wzb5210 Jul 1 '11 at 15:57
    
@wzb5210 maybe there is something unclear about 'objects aren't in different threads' etc., but I don't think so. –  EJP Jul 1 '11 at 20:58
    
Downvoter: please explain. Some error here? –  EJP Jul 12 '11 at 10:38

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