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I have a file with blank lines and I need to double space the lines in the file. Meaning I need a blank line between two lines with text in it. Can you show me an easy way to do it with awk and/or sed

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What do you want to do with the existing blank lines? –  glenn jackman Jul 1 '11 at 1:24

9 Answers 9

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Try this

sed '/^$/d' fileName | sed G
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+1 first with a working solution –  jcomeau_ictx Jul 1 '11 at 1:09

Assuming:

  1. You want to do this in just SED
  2. You want to do it all in one pass
  3. Some of your "blank" lines might contain tabs|spaces
  4. The current spacing is non-uniform (0, 1, or more blanks after each line)
  5. You want to end up with uniform double-spacing

Try this:

#!bin/sed -f
/^[ \t]*$/d
/^..*$/a\

The first line says:       If you see a "blank line", delete it.
The second line says: If you see a non-blank line, append a line after it.

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jcomeau@intrepid:/tmp$ cat test.txt
test
tset 2
test 3
test 4
jcomeau@intrepid:/tmp$ sed 's/\(.*\)/\1\n/' test.txt
test

tset 2

test 3

test 4

Sai's sed G test.txt works also, but I have no idea how.

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'how': in a first pass, you delete all empty lines (assuming lines do not contain white space); in a second pass, you append the content of hold space (==an empty line as we put nothing in it) to each line, then print it. –  gnometorule Jan 2 '12 at 17:10

Assuming you want to keep the existing blank lines intact:

awk '
    prev && $0 {print ""}
    {print; prev = $0}
'

The first test will only be true if both the previous line and the current line are non-empty.

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using sed

$ sed G input.txt | cat -s
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Try this

awk '{print $0 "\n"}' fileName
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Assuming:

  1. You want to do this in just AWK
  2. You want to do it all in one pass
  3. Some of your "blank" lines might contain tabs|spaces
  4. The current spacing is non-uniform (0, 1, or more blanks after each line)
  5. You want to end up with uniform double-spacing

Try this:

awk '$0 !~ /^[ \t]*$/ { print $0, "\n" }' <file>

Breaking this up,

  The part before the curly bracket says:   Match only non-blank lines
  The part within the curly brackets says:   Print this line and append one more (a blank one)

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My solution is somewhat similar to @Vikki's solution (which I think is quite good). But I also wanted to explain some of the syntax, with some suggestions on how to approach this at the end.

$ cat >> moarlines
#!/bin/sed -f
G;G

$ chmod u+rx moarlines

$ ./moarnewlines mytext

To ignore lines that have 0 non-space characters (blank lines):

#!/bin/sed -f
/$.+^/ G;G

That regex is 'for one or more non-blank character between the beginning and the end of the line', then the next statement uses 'G' to append two newlines.

Note: for a blank line you would still wind up with 3 blanks. If this is not what you want, use @Sai's solution, or:

#!/bin/sed -f
/^$/ d
/$.*^/ G

...which does essentially the same thing. The first line selects lines with no characters and uses 'd' to delete them, and the second line is as before. BUT WAIT - what if I have a blank line with a even single space or tab on it (@Vikki addressed this)? In this case our solution doesn't work (nor will sed '/^$/d' fileName | sed G). What we want is a delete regex statement which selects an arbitrary number (including 0) of tabs and spaces in any order which occupy the whole line from the beginning to the end, i.e. $^(\s|\t)*$. In sed we need to escape special characters like (|) so we wind up with:

#!/bin/sed -f
/^\(\s\|\t\)*$/ d
G

@Vikki's first line is also correct (select from the character range of space or tab n number of times) and to be honest you should probably use it - I just wanted to show you another way. My way is also useful if you want to select only a group of characters, say a sequence of 5 spaces or tabs have a special meaning.

If you want a relatively easy 1 liner, you could combine what we just learned with @Sai's solution:

$ sed '/^[ \t]*$/d' fileName | sed G

Sorry for the essay, but hopefully that gives you an idea of how to approach the problem and some of the hang-ups you could encounter.

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sed -n 's/.*/&\n/p'

& and \n should work I guess

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