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Given

2,1016,7/31/2008 14:22,Geoff Dalgas,6/5/2011 22:21,http://stackoverflow.com,"Corvallis, OR",7679,351,81,b437f461b3fd27387c5d8ab47a293d35,34

How to use C# to split the above information into strings as follows:

2
1016
7/31/2008 14:22
Geoff Dalgas
6/5/2011 22:21
http://stackoverflow.com
Corvallis, OR
7679
351
81
b437f461b3fd27387c5d8ab47a293d35
34

As you can see one of the column contains , <= (Corvallis, OR)

// update // Based on C# Regex Split - commas outside quotes

string[] result = Regex.Split(samplestring, ",(?=(?:[^\"]*\"[^\"]*\")*[^\"]*$)");
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1  
Though in Java, similar Question : stackoverflow.com/questions/1757065/… –  99tm Jul 1 '11 at 2:28
    
@saugok, sorry sir, it is not. –  q0987 Jul 1 '11 at 2:30
    
Using a regex to do this is bad advice. The .NET Framework already has built-in support to parse CSV. See this answer which is the one you should accept. Otherwise I'll close this as a dupe of stackoverflow.com/questions/3147836/… which is just as equally wrong. –  Kev Jul 1 '11 at 18:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 25 down vote accepted

Use the Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.TextFieldParser class. This will handle parsing a delimited file, TextReader or Stream where some fields are enclosed in quotes and some are not.

For example:

using Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.TextFieldParser;

string csv = "2,1016,7/31/2008 14:22,Geoff Dalgas,6/5/2011 22:21,http://stackoverflow.com,\"Corvallis, OR\",7679,351,81,b437f461b3fd27387c5d8ab47a293d35,34";

TextFieldParser parser = new TextFieldParser(new StringReader(csv));

// You can also read from a file
// TextFieldParser parser = new TextFieldParser("mycsvfile.csv);

parser.HasFieldsEnclosedInQuotes = true;
parser.SetDelimiters(",");

string[] fields;

while (!parser.EndOfData)
{
    fields = parser.ReadFields();
    foreach (string field in fields)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(field);
    }
} 

parser.Close();

This should result in the following output:

2
1016
7/31/2008 14:22
Geoff Dalgas
6/5/2011 22:21
http://stackoverflow.com
Corvallis, OR
7679
351
81
b437f461b3fd27387c5d8ab47a293d35
34

See Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.TextFieldParser for more information.

You need to add a reference to Microsoft.VisualBasic in the Add References .NET tab.

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1  
Dude, thank you very much for this solution, I have about 500K+ rows of CSV data that I need to load into a table and it loaded with commas contained inside of quotes. I owe you an adult beverage of your choice if our paths ever cross. –  Mark Kram Jul 30 at 17:56

You could split on all commas that do have an even number of quotes following them.

You would also like to view at the specf for CSV format about handling comma's.

Useful Link : C# Regex Split - commas outside quotes

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3  
@q0987 - this is not the right answer. There is built in support for this in the Framework: stackoverflow.com/questions/6542996/… –  Kev Jul 1 '11 at 18:10

Use a library like LumenWorks to do your CSV reading. It'll handle fields with quotes in them and will likely overall be more robust than your custom solution by virtue of having been around for a long time.

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I see that if you paste csv delimited text in Excel and do a "Text to Columns", it asks you for a "text qualifier". It's defaulted to a double quote so that it treats text within double quotes as literal. I imagine that Excel implements this by going one character at a time, if it encounters a "text qualifier", it keeps going to the next "qualifier". You can probably implement this yourself with a for loop and a boolean to denote if you're inside literal text.

public string[] CsvParser(string csvText)
{
    List<string> tokens = new List<string>();

    int last = -1;
    int current = 0;
    bool inText = false;

    while(current < csvText.Length)
    {
        switch(csvText[current])
        {
            case '"':
                inText = !inText; break;
            case ',':
                if (!inText) 
                {
                    tokens.Add(csvText.Substring(last + 1, (current - last)).Trim(' ', ',')); 
                    last = current;
                }
                break;
            default:
                break;
        }
        current++;
    }

    if (last != csvText.Length - 1) 
    {
        tokens.Add(csvText.Substring(last+1).Trim());
    }

    return tokens.ToArray();
}
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