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I have a C# .dll that is envoked from within a C# application useing "System.Reflection" at runtime. The .dll contains a WinForm class which is used to display information to the user. The .dll is envoked using the following code:

    DLL = Assembly.LoadFrom(strDllPath);    
    classType = DLL.GetType(String.Format("{0}.{0}", strNsCn));    
    classInst = Activator.CreateInstance(classType, paramObj);    
    Form dllWinForm = (Form)classInst;      
    dllWinForm.ShowDialog();

Now, my problem is now that I want to return a string from the WinForm .dll. This could be an error or just to show that the process completed correctly. I know how this is done when calling a method from within a requested .dll, as follows:

    System.Reflection.Assembly LoadedAssembly = System.Reflection.Assembly.Load("mscorlib.dll");
    System.Console.WriteLine(LoadedAssembly.GetName());
    object myObject = LoadedAssembly.CreateInstance("System.DateTime", false, BindingFlags.ExactBinding, null, new Object[] {2000, 1, 1, 12, 0, 0}, null, null);
    MethodInfo m = LoadedAssembly.GetType("System.DateTime").GetMethod("ToLongDateString");
    string result = (string) m.Invoke(myObject, null);

but how do you do this for my case of a WinForm called from a .dll at runtime?

Any suggestions would be most appreciated.

share|improve this question
3  
Your question made me puke in my mouth a little. I should ask: "Why in the gods names are you doing this?" but instead I'll just answer: you apparently own the "WinForm dll", so add an instance method, lets call it MyMethod, that returns a string to the type in the "WinForms dll" that you retrieve using DLL.GetType w/ the class name stored in strNsCn. Then retrieve the MethodInfo and invoke it in the same way you did for DateTime.ToLongDateString. –  Paul Wheeler Jul 1 '11 at 3:05
1  
While @Paul was unnecessarily rude, he does have a point. Why are you using reflection for this? –  Nick Jul 1 '11 at 3:10
    
Come now, the 'puke in my mouth' bit was both appropriate for this level of nastiness and entertaining :) –  Tahbaza Jul 1 '11 at 3:14
    
I am doing this to show the user in depth progress of the operations being undertaken inside the .dll. This avoids having to go down the "public event ProgressUpdatedHandler" route and deal with parsing from .dll to my application. I don't know of anyother way to envoke a managed C# .dll from within a C# application. I am fairly new to C#. @Wheeler, the reason why I am doing this was stated in the question. If you could exend as to why should I not be doing this that would be helpful. –  Killercam Jul 1 '11 at 3:33
    
Moreover, @Paul Wheelegood this suggestion will not work as it will instantiate a new instance of the class. Which is no good to me... –  Killercam Jul 1 '11 at 3:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Okay, so to boil the question and the comments down, what we're trying to do here is have a C# app that loads a dll that was implemented by a 3rd party at a later date, and the app needs to get some status information from the component in the loaded dll (the fact that the component uses WinForms vs. some other UI seems completely inconsequential).

The best way to do it is to start out with an interface or base class that can be shared between the hosting application and the loaded component. In order to achieve this, the interface needs to be in a separate dll. So first we create a class library project and add the following class:

using System;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace SimplePluginShared
{
    public class PluginBase : Form
    {
        public virtual String GetStatus()
        {
            return null;
        }
    }
}

Then add a reference to that class library from the project that implements the component you're loading via reflection (or share it with your third party for them to implement). Here is an example implementation of Plugin Base:

using System;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using SimplePluginShared;

namespace SimplePluginExample
{
    public partial class MyForm : PluginBase
    {
        private String _status = "Unspecified";

        public MyForm()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        public override string GetStatus()
        {
            return _status;
        }

        private void btnGive_Click(Object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            _status = "Give Him The Stick.";
            this.DialogResult = DialogResult.OK;
            this.Close();
        }

        private void btnDontGive_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            _status = "Don't Give Him The Stick!";
            this.DialogResult = DialogResult.Cancel;
            this.Close();
        }
    }
}

And lastly the code to load and call the component:

using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using SimplePluginShared;

namespace SimplePluginHost
{
    public partial class MainForm : Form
    {
        public MainForm()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void btnBrowse_Click(Object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            OpenFileDialog openPluginDlg = new OpenFileDialog() { DefaultExt = "dll", Multiselect = false, Title = "Open Plugin DLL", Filter = "DLLs|*.dll" };
            if (openPluginDlg.ShowDialog() == DialogResult.OK)
            {
                txtPluginPath.Text = openPluginDlg.FileName;
            }
        }

        private void btnGo_Click(Object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            Assembly pluginDll = Assembly.LoadFrom(txtPluginPath.Text);
            Type pluginType = pluginDll.GetTypes().Where(t => typeof(PluginBase).IsAssignableFrom(t)).First();
            PluginBase pluginInstance = (PluginBase)Activator.CreateInstance(pluginType);
            pluginInstance.ShowDialog();
            MessageBox.Show(pluginInstance.GetStatus());
        }
    }
}

He are some screenshots:

Displaying the Dialog

Displaying the Status Text

share|improve this answer
    
By the way, I'm calling this an example of a "plugin" but normally plugins are loaded in a restricted security context or app domain to prevent them from behaving badly, so I would only use the above with components that I trust. –  Paul Wheeler Jul 1 '11 at 15:37
    
That is a brilliant answer. I tried to post the answer last night but my connection was down. I did this a similar but altogether more simple way. I adopted a 'public string' method called ReturnString within my .dll (which I will make a mandatory requirement for authors of the .dlls); and I call it using: 'XmlExpInfo = classType.GetMethod("ReturnString");' and then invoking it using: 'string strReturn = (string)XmlExpInfo.Invoke(classInst, null);'. Thanks for your post, class... –  Killercam Jul 1 '11 at 23:47
    
Ps. I cannot vote this up as I have < 15 rep –  Killercam Jul 1 '11 at 23:47

Why can't you add the dll as a reference to your project and call it that way? (Just like any other assembly?)

enter image description here enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Nick (I can't vote your answer up (I would) as I don't have a 15 rep). However, I cannot do as you suggest because the nature of my application means that the .dll must be called at runtime. I cannot hard code anything about the methods etc. that are contained within the .dll into my application. These .dlls are to be written as an when users of our application request them and require them, which means the application must written as generically as possible in this reguard. This is what makes this process awkward. Thanks for your time. –  Killercam Jul 1 '11 at 4:15
    
I'm not sure how to respond to that. (This is like my 4th attempt.) It sounds like you're saying you have (1) no knowledge of what dll you'll be calling OR (2) what functions it will contain. That's completely nonsensical. How can you write a program revolving around an API you know nothing about? –  Nick Jul 1 '11 at 4:26
    
It is not nonsensical. That is right. In my application, I have set up the ability to pass ANY number of parameters to ANY .dll at runtime. This means I don't know what I will be passing to a .dll in the future as I haven't authored the .dll yet. Doing this, it enables me to write complex functionality for clients at their request with out having to ammend the main application. Reguardless of why I want/need to do this, the question stands. –  Killercam Jul 1 '11 at 4:35

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