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I want to construct variable name N_foo and N_bar and use their values in the following:

#!/bin/bash
N_foo=2
N_bar=3
for i in { "foo" "bar" }
do
    for j in { 1..$(`N_$i`) }
    do
        echo $j
    done
done

I want to use the values of N_foo and N_bar in the two inner loops and print out 1, 2 and 1, 2, 3, respectively. What's the correct syntax?

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first youll have to remove the { } from outer for and remove space next to the {} in inner loop. echo { 1..3 } does not produce what you want. –  Lynch Jul 1 '11 at 3:40
    
arrays are the best way to avoid this kind of "eval" hell. What are you actually trying to do? –  glenn jackman Jul 1 '11 at 4:06
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted
#!/bin/bash
N_foo=2
N_bar=3
for i in "foo" "bar"
do
    key="N_${i}"
    eval count='$'$key
    for j in `seq 1 $count`
    do
        echo $j
    done
done
share|improve this answer
    
eval is the classic solution to this sort of issue. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 1 '11 at 3:42
    
@Computist: I rejected the edit you made to this answer. The answer didn't use the ${!symbol} syntax you are asking about. Your edit is really a new question. If you decide not to open a new question for it, you should edit your own question instead of the answer. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jul 1 '11 at 4:31
    
Notice that you do not need the inner loop -- seq 1 $count is enough. –  a3nm Jul 1 '11 at 20:57
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#!/bin/bash
N_foo=2
N_bar=3
for i in "foo" "bar"
do
    i2="N_$i"
    seq 1 ${!i2}
done
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You can use the indirect variable reference operator:

Example

var="foo"
nfoo=1
ref=n${var}
echo $ref
echo ${!ref}

Which gives this output:

nfoo
1
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But that still won't solve it. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jul 1 '11 at 3:22
    
Ignacio: Yeah you're right - didn't work like I expected it to when used in the for loop range braces. {1..${!var}} didn't create a range like I thought it would.... –  sashang Jul 1 '11 at 3:44
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I ended up using the following code. It uses the parameter substitution technique (c.f. http://tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/parameter-substitution.html).

#!/bin/bash
N_foo=2
N_bar=3
for i in "foo" "bar"
do
j_max=N_$i
for (( j=1;  j<=${!j_max}; j++ ))
    do
    echo $j
    done
done

The ! is history expansion parameter (c.f. http://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/bashref.html#Special-Parameters). !j_max will be replaced by the most recent value set to j_max which is N_foo/N_bar in 1st/2nd iteration. It then calls ${N_foo}/${N_bar} which has value 2/3 in the 1st/2nd iteration.

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