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Using R, what is the best way I can aggregate rows on a condition that spans multiple rows. For example to aggregate any rows where z = 0 for n or more times.

What this would look like run on the following sample table with n = 3.

Sample Table x:

x   y   z
0   0   6
5   5   0
40  2   0
4   0   0
10  0   1
0   0   2
11  7   0
0   4   0
0   0   0
0   0   0
0   0   2
18  0   4

Results Table:

x   y   z
0   0   6
49  7   0 <- Above two rows got aggregated
10  0   1
0   0   2
11  11  0 <- Above three rows got aggregated
0   0   2
18  0   4
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Must merged data be placed where the "zero" chunks was before or can it be appended at the end? –  Roman Luštrik Jul 1 '11 at 7:27
    
It would be better to have the data added in place, however that is one of the problems I ran into trying to solve this problem myself. I was thinking of attaching an index so that afterwards the table could be sorted back into order. –  themartinmcfly Jul 1 '11 at 9:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is the code I used to produce your result. If you have any questions, fire away.

mmf <- read.table(textConnection("x   y   z # read in your example data
0   0   6
5   5   0
40  2   0
4   0   0
10  0   1
0   0   2
11  7   0
0   4   0
0   0   0
0   0   0
0   0   2
18  0   4"), header = TRUE)

# see where there are zeros in the y column
mmf.rle <- rle(mmf$z) 
mmf.rle <- data.frame(lengths = mmf.rle$lengths, values = mmf.rle$values)

merge.rows <- 3
# select rows that have more or equal to three zeros
mmf.zero <- which(mmf.rle$values == 0 & mmf.rle$lengths >= merge.rows)

for (i in mmf.zero) {
# find which positions are zero, calculate sums and insert the result into a data.frame where the rows in question were turned to NA
    m.mmf <- mmf.rle$lengths[1:i] # select elements from 1 to where the zero appears
    select.rows <- (sum(m.mmf[1:length(m.mmf) - 1])+1):sum(m.mmf) # magic
    mmf.sum <- colSums(mmf[select.rows, ]) # sum values column-wise for rows that have at least three zeros in z
    mmf[select.rows,] <- NA # now that we have a sum by columns, we turn those numbers into NAs...
    mmf[select.rows[1], ] <- mmf.sum # ... and insert summed result into the first NA row       
}

# remove any left over NA rows
mmf <- mmf[complete.cases(mmf),]
share|improve this answer
    
Your solution works brilliantly, It is going to take me a while to parse through your code so I understand all parts myself. Is this the basic idea? count the rows that fit the condition (in this case 0) find the counts that are bigger than the amount of consecutive rows allowed (in this case 3) go through all matches aggregate results mark rows aggregated for later removal remove all that have been marked from removal –  themartinmcfly Jul 1 '11 at 9:48
    
There is no white space formatting in my above comment so if it doesn't make sense feel free to ignore. –  themartinmcfly Jul 1 '11 at 9:50
1  
@themartinmcfly You got the basic idea. You can go through the for loop step by step by placing browser() in the first line. When you run the loop, the execution will pause at the line where browser is located. You can step to next line by typing n or you can execute code by sending the desired line by hand. For details, see ?browser. –  Roman Luštrik Jul 1 '11 at 10:29

Since it seems like you're still in the "leaRning phase", I thought an example using the plyr package would be helpful. plyr is an extremely handy library which allows you to slice/dice datasets and summarize their subgroups in a flexible (and terse -- as you'll see below) manner, so it would likely be worth your time to get to know. If you find yourself needing to do similar operations on extremely large data sets, you might also consider looking into the data.table package.

I'm assuming you've done Roman's textConnection trick to get your data into a data.frame named mmf. I'm adding an idx column to mmf so you can subset it and process the results group by group:

library(plyr)
# mmf <- read.table(textConnection( ...
rle.idx <- rle(mmf$z)
mmf$idx <- rep(seq(RLE$lengths), RLE$lengths)
ans <- ddply(mmf, .(idx), colwise(sum))

And ans looks like:

 x  y z idx
 0  0 6   1
49  7 0   6
10  0 1   3
 0  0 2   4
11 11 0  20
 0  0 2   6
18  0 4   7

Just remove the idx column and you're done, eg:

ans <- ans[, -4]
share|improve this answer
    
nice trick! but your code would fail if there are continuous sequences of length >= 3 of non-zero numbers. it should be easy enough to modify your code to account for this possibility. –  Ramnath Jul 2 '11 at 12:46
    
I'm not sure I follow the scenario you describe ... where would "continuous sequences of length >= 3" be problematic, exactly? Are you saying that the rle trick wouldn't work if the z column was continuous? That indeed would require a different approach, but I don't think this is what you're saying? –  Steve Lianoglou Jul 2 '11 at 23:11
    
Thank you for the plyr recommendation. Looking through its documentation it seems to be easier to understand for those with a more of a c background (not quite used to thinking in sets yet myself). Although swapping loops for these rle tricks seems to be my next learning curve. I am going to have to step through this and take a look when carving up the data (which is what I am up to now :D). –  themartinmcfly Jul 4 '11 at 3:07
    
@themartinmcfly: I'd actually disagree with you on your notion that "plyr is easier for people with a c background". I think it's more intuitive for people w/ a functional programming background vs. imperative (like C is). Knowing C might make it more difficult! With plyr (along with R's "normal" *apply functions), the programmer no longer cares about the mechanics of the looping, like a C programmer would (eg, for (i = 0; i < len; i++;) something = antother[i]), but you rather focus on "apply"-ing things (functions) over collections of other things (lists, or groups of a data.frame, etc.) –  Steve Lianoglou Jul 4 '11 at 19:23
    
Oops that is what I meant, sorry Steve. I have a C background and tend to think iteratively and find that a barrier to R. –  themartinmcfly Jul 6 '11 at 10:32

DATA

mmf <- read.table(textConnection("x y z # read in your example data 0 0 6 5 5 0 40 2 0 4 0 0 10 0 1 0 0 2 11 7 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 18 0 4"), header = TRUE)

CODE

agg_n <- function(dat=mmf,coln="z",n=3){
    agg <- function(.x) {
        # Sum values if first n=3 records in column coln="z" are 0 
        if(all(.x[[coln]][seq(n)] == 0)) {
            y <- rbind(colSums(.x[seq(n),]),.x[-1*seq(n),])
        } else y <- .x
        return(y)
    }
    # Groups of records starting with 0 in column coln="z"
    G <- cumsum(diff(c(0L,dat[[coln]] == 0))==1)
    new_dat <- do.call(rbind,lapply(split(dat,G),agg))
    return(new_dat)
}

OUTPUT

> agg_n()
      x  y z
0     0  0 6
1.1  49  7 0
1.5  10  0 1
1.6   0  0 2
2.1  11 11 0
2.10  0  0 0
2.11  0  0 2
2.12 18  0 4
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