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I have following class, which is used by a Windows Installer project, to install a service:

[RunInstaller(true)]
public sealed class Installer : System.Configuration.Install.Installer
{
    private readonly string _installDir;

    public Installer()
    {
        var locatedAssembly = this.GetType().Assembly.Location;
        this._installDir = Path.GetDirectoryName(locatedAssembly);
        var serviceProcessInstaller = new ServiceProcessInstaller
        {
            Account = ServiceAccount.LocalSystem
        };

        var serviceInstaller = new ServiceInstaller
        {
            ServiceName = Settings.Service.Name,
            StartType = ServiceStartMode.Automatic
        };

        this.Installers.Add(serviceProcessInstaller);
        this.Installers.Add(serviceInstaller);
        this.Context = new InstallContext(this._installDir + @"\install.log", new[]
        {
            string.Format("/assemlypath={0}", locatedAssembly)
        });
    }

    public override void Install(IDictionary stateSaver)
    {
        base.Install(stateSaver);

        var serviceController = new ServiceController(Settings.Service.Name);
        serviceController.Start();
        serviceController.WaitForStatus(ServiceControllerStatus.Running);
    }
}

If we call the following code inside a console application, the directory of the assembly will be taken:

using (var stream = File.Open("foo.store", FileMode.OpenOrCreate))

If I run the line from my Windows Service, C:\Windows\System32\ will be taken instead.

How can I change this behaviour?

For clarification: I do not want to utilize any assembly-spying (get the path of the assembly from this.GetType()...) or anything in the appsettings. I want it to work straight without any magic on the caller side :)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You will need to read the folder location from a configuration file, or the registry. There's no analogue of starting directory.

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nay ... no registry hacking - that would be brutal :) config-hacking would be ok, if i would like to have flexibility ... but the whole unit will be something internal, no hijacking ... but thanks for the info! –  Andreas Niedermair Jul 1 '11 at 6:53
    
You're happy to write a service but are sacred of reading a single value from the registry?of reading a single value from the registry? –  David Heffernan Jul 1 '11 at 7:05
    
actually: yes, i do not like the idea of utilizing the registry for this simple task ... there must be something much simpler! –  Andreas Niedermair Jul 1 '11 at 7:14
    
registry is the default config option for services. There's a dedicated key for each service. –  David Heffernan Jul 1 '11 at 7:18
    
well, originally coming from console/web-apps i'm neither used to it nor willed to utilize the registry for this simple task. but i'm really happy with your insights - thanks! –  Andreas Niedermair Jul 1 '11 at 7:34

Don't trust the current directory. If the file is located besides the service use:

string sdir = Path.GetDirectoryName(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location);

to recover the path in which the executable is, and use it as a base path to look for the file.

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i know, that i shouldn't trust the current directory - i wouldn't do, if this wouldn't be used in a very closed component - nothing public, and i'll have 100% control over the whole unit ... :) well ... damn it ... no chance though :( –  Andreas Niedermair Jul 1 '11 at 6:51

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