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I have been googling for the "Differences between fileset and path" article for some time, but have found nothing useful. For example, what is the difference between the following (say, there is a someDir directory, which contains .jar files and has no subdirectories):

<path id="somePathId">
    <pathelement path="someDir"/>
</path>

<path id="someId">
  <path refid="somePathId" />
</path>

and

<path id="someId">
  <fileset dir="someDir">
     <include name="*.*">
  </fileset>
</path>

?

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By the way, there is a posibility to specify the one-file-fileset. Isn't it better to use a nested <pathelement location="singleFile" /> instead? –  Dmitry Jul 1 '11 at 6:58
    
Thank you, edited –  Dmitry Jul 1 '11 at 8:40
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

They are used in different situations.

fileset is used to specify a group of files. You can use selectors and patternsets to get only the files you want.

classpath is used to specify classpath references. classpath can be specified with a single jar (location="..."), a ; or : separated list of jars (path="...") or with nested resource collections (like fileset).

Also if you want to debug them, it is different:

<echo message="Build-path: ${toString:build-path}" />

vs

<property name="debug.classpath" refid="classpath"/>
<echo message="Classpath = ${debug.classpath}"/>

As for your scripts,

<path id="somePathId">
    <pathelement location="someDir"/>
</path>

I did not test it but according to the documentation path= expects a ; or : separated list of jars. This is not the same as your second example.

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Thank you very much! That really helped! –  Dmitry Jul 1 '11 at 10:01
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The major difference between a <path> and a <fileset> is that in <fileset> you can specify if you want to include or exclude certain type of files (Basically, its a group of files within a path... not necessary all the files), for eg:

<path id="someId">
  <fileset dir="someDir">
     <include name="*.java">
     <include name="*.properties">
  </fileset>
</path>
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AFAIK this example won't work because it will search for files matching both expressions, i.e. *.java and *.properties. –  Thresh Jul 1 '11 at 9:33
2  
Yes, that's what I was trying to say .. I am searching for both of these files. If you cant to exclude a pattern, you can use <exclude... –  Arpit Jul 1 '11 at 10:00
    
Anyway, thank you for the answer! –  Dmitry Jul 1 '11 at 10:00
2  
@Arpit I mean that the script you specified will not work. include patterns are applied using and and there is no file that can match both. Documentation: If any of the selectors within the FileSet do not select the file, the file is not considered part of the FileSet. This makes a FileSet equivalent to an <and> selector container. –  Thresh Jul 1 '11 at 10:04
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